My piece in the Irish Post on Brexit and stuff.

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I wrote an article for the Irish Post on the subject of what a May victory means for Ireland in terms of what a hard Brexit will impose upon Ireland - and I observe that there is no longer (if ever there was) an Irish electoral bloc with any clout to counter the scandal of the imposition upon Ireland barely meriting a mention by any politician or any of the electorate.

Quite a few of the comments under the facebook link to the article accuse me of pushing a Tory agenda (me being a red in tooth and claw Corbynite and Labour member) for having the temerity to observe that it is very unlikely that he will win (albeit the article was written three weeks back before the narrowing in the polls).

Here is the link.. have a read and tell me how crap the article is...

http://irishpost.co.uk/there-is-no-irish-voice-anymore-irish-in-britain-have-lost-their-electoral-muscle/
 


PBP voter

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Second-generation Irish people no longer feel the Irish aspect to their identity to be a politically-charged albatross around their necks, confused by the apparently conflicting sides to it.

Complete integration into the host community is now normal by the second or third generation.
I agree this is a good thing.

Integrate into your new country or go home.

Multiculturalism doesn't work.
 

Nebuchadnezzar

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Unfortunately I got the distinct impression that most of the Irish community in Britain were pro Brexit and even then Bob Geldoffs vociferous support for Remain was counterproductive.

Who should the Remain Irish support? I don't see any credible options in U.K. politics atm.
 

GDPR

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Nope, I dont disagree with any of that, except I would doubt there ever was a distinct Hiberno-Brit voting bloc in England, in the way one used to be able to speak of an "Irish-American vote" in the States, or indeed the current Muslim vote which can be relied on to turn out for a specific party or candidate.

The fact that one of the key red lines of the EU negotiating position is the Irish Border seems to have gone well over everyones heads. The EU say they will not even begin to discuss a post-BREXIT trade deal unless this issue is addressed.

Since the GFA, and the devolved Assembly, Britain has lost all interest at all in NI. It seems they have mentally or psycholgically "abandoned" the place. Mind you they never thought of it as being an integral part of the Union, like Scotland or Wales. More of a "damnosa hereditas".
 

GDPR

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I agree this is a good thing.

Integrate into your new country or go home.

Multiculturalism doesn't work.
An interesting fact is that the Hiberno-English are actually suffer from over representation on the Nationalist Hard Right in England. The two leaders of the EDL in their hey day and Derek Holland spring first to mind.
 
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PBP voter

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Nope, I dont disagree with any of that, except I would doubt there ever was a distinct Hiberno-Brit voting bloc in England, in the way one used to be able to speak of an "Irish-American vote" in the States, or indeed the current Muslim vote which can be relied on to turn out for a specific party or candidate.

The fact that one of the key red lines of the EU negotiating position is the Irish Border seems to have gone well over everyones heads. The EU say they will not even begin to discuss a post-BREXIT trade deal unless this issue is addressed.

Since the GFA, and the devolved Assembly, Britain has lost all interest at all in NI. It seems they have mentally or psycholgically "abandoned" the place. Mind you they never thought of it as being an integral part of the Union, like Scotland or Wales. More of a "damnosa hereditas".
Nearly all the Irish construction workers in London in the 80s voted Tory.
 

mangaire2

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Nearly all the Irish construction workers in London in the 80s voted Tory.
they did in their arse.
I have many relatives over two generations in England.
many of them worked in construction,
& of those who vote, all of them are strong Labour.
 

PBP voter

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they did in their arse.
I have many relatives over two generations in England.
many of them worked in construction,
& of those who vote, all of them are strong Labour.
Shy Tory voters. They just can't come out and say it.

The Tory are the party of property developers and builders.

They have let thousands of houses and apartments be built in the UK that will never be needed.

http://uk.businessinsider.com/property-partner-20000-ghost-homes-sitting-empty-in-london-2017-4


London emerges as the vacant home capital of the country, with 19,845 homes sitting idle for over six months in 2016. Across England, there were 200,145 empty homes.
 

GDPR

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they did in their arse.
I have many relatives over two generations in England.
many of them worked in construction,
& of those who vote, all of them are strong Labour.
Finger in the air, I would say historically many Irish people and/or those of Irish extraction voted Labour, because their class interests rather than their national interests were better represented by Labour. The Irish also used to be TU stalwarts in many industries.

But thats a far cry from saying they voted with NI/Ireland or the Border in mind. In my experience, many second or third generation Irish in the UK were embarrassed by the Troubles. The Noraid-style involvement in NI was not replicated in the UK.

And of course there were always Irish Tories. Look at "Guido Fawkes". Some of the truly nastier specimens were and are of Irish background.
 

LookWhoItIs

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Nearly all the Irish construction workers in London in the 80s voted Tory.
To take that poll was it yourself who stood outside McGovern's in Kilburn in the 80's on pay day asking the Irish lads how many would be voting for Maggie
 

DJP

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I wrote an article for the Irish Post on the subject of what a May victory means for Ireland in terms of what a hard Brexit will impose upon Ireland - and I observe that there is no longer (if ever there was) an Irish electoral bloc with any clout to counter the scandal of the imposition upon Ireland barely meriting a mention by any politician or any of the electorate.

Quite a few of the comments under the facebook link to the article accuse me of pushing a Tory agenda (me being a red in tooth and claw Corbynite and Labour member) for having the temerity to observe that it is very unlikely that he will win (albeit the article was written three weeks back before the narrowing in the polls).

Here is the link.. have a read and tell me how crap the article is...

http://irishpost.co.uk/there-is-no-irish-voice-anymore-irish-in-britain-have-lost-their-electoral-muscle/
Is your real name Thomas Gilmartin or are you copying the name of Thomas Gilmartin from one of the tribunals?
 

PBP voter

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To take that poll was it yourself who stood outside McGovern's in Kilburn in the 80's on pay day asking the Irish lads how many would be voting for Maggie
I knew a few theodolite monkeys,Architetcts etc back in the day and they all voted Tory.

I knew plenty of tradesmen who wouldn't touch Labour with a barge pole. Why would they vote for more taxes on their highly profitable businesses?
 

former wesleyan

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It's a dubious proposition to say that by taking a strong pro-SF line Corbyn cold be said to have had the best interests of the Irish in Britain at heart. Aside from his work on behalf of miscarriages of justice he did very little and even there Chris Mullin did more than Corbyn.
 

GDPR

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It's a dubious proposition to say that by taking a strong pro-SF line Corbyn cold be said to have had the best interests of the Irish in Britain at heart. Aside from his work on behalf of miscarriages of justice he did very little and even there Chris Mullin did more than Corbyn.
Well TBF, Corbyn wasnt very well known outside his Islington manor. I lived in London at that time, and he barely registered. Ken Livingstone would have been a much higher profile politician who actively reached out to SF - I remember him inviting Adams to the Finsbury Fleadh, which caused a rumpus at the time.
 
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It's a dubious proposition to say that by taking a strong pro-SF line Corbyn cold be said to have had the best interests of the Irish in Britain at heart. Aside from his work on behalf of miscarriages of justice he did very little and even there Chris Mullin did more than Corbyn.
He did a lot more than that. When we had very few friends in the 70s and 80s, he spoke up on our behalf, encouraged and promoted Irish community events, and did a lot more than merely protest miscarriages of justice. As did Ken Livingstone. Whatever somebody might think of their politics, we appreciated it a lot at the time.
 
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Well TBF, Corbyn wasnt very well known outside his Islington manor. I lived in London at that time, and he barely registered. Ken Livingstone would have been a much higher profile politician who actively reached out to SF - I remember him inviting Adams to the Finsbury Fleadh, which caused a rumpus at the time.
My sister was at the Fleadh in Roundwood Park in the late 80s, when police on horseback charged a completely blameless crowd - nearly trampling my sister underfoot. The following day the Daily Mail called the crowd an 'IRA mob' on the front page. That was the sort of sh1t we put up with all the time.
 

GDPR

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My sister was at the Fleadh in Roundwood Park in the late 80s, when police on horseback charged a completely blameless crowd - nearly trampling my sister underfoot. The following day the Daily Mail called the crowd an 'IRA mob' on the front page. That was the sort of sh1t we put up with all the time.
Yes, there was a hell of a lot of cynical newspaper stirring. The Daily Mail used to run regular articles on Sefton the Horse who perished in the Regents Park Bandstand Bombing.

Not to play Devils Advocate, but this was the same period as the Hillsborough Stadium Disaster, when the gutter press demonised the Liverpool fans. We now know the police lied and lied and lied about the events of that day, and sections of the press were happy to condemn an entire city.

As for the horrible bitterness of the Miners Strike, dont start me. Those were bloody awful times.
 

Catalpast

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I wrote an article for the Irish Post on the subject of what a May victory means for Ireland in terms of what a hard Brexit will impose upon Ireland - and I observe that there is no longer (if ever there was) an Irish electoral bloc with any clout to counter the scandal of the imposition upon Ireland barely meriting a mention by any politician or any of the electorate.

Quite a few of the comments under the facebook link to the article accuse me of pushing a Tory agenda (me being a red in tooth and claw Corbynite and Labour member) for having the temerity to observe that it is very unlikely that he will win (albeit the article was written three weeks back before the narrowing in the polls).

Here is the link.. have a read and tell me how crap the article is...

'There is no Irish voice anymore' - Irish in Britain have lost their electoral muscle - Irish Post
Janey bringing back memories there!

Used to be a regular reader of the Post back in the day!

Cant say I was ever embarrassed by the 'Troubles' - and we were living there when Lord Louis went sky high!

Mind I have to say the amount of outright hostility I encountered was minimal

- most people knew that it was not all black and white

- they sure hated the IRA though!:mad:

The English had not a clue about Ireland and had only the vaguest notion of Ireland's geography

We were just a small crazy island off the coast of the Mainland

I don't think anything much has changed in 40 years by the sound of it....:?
 


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