Myers has Finally Lost it.

crip sandwich

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No, I don't mean stereotypes - although there probably is a certain amount of statistical basis to some of the stereotyping we associate with various groups. I'd be surprised if there wasn't a statistical correlation between being Welsh & having blue eyes, I'd be surprised if the average height of a the Welsh was anything close to that of Norwegians - although I've never seen figures. But a stereotype is just that - a crude & insensitive characterization. I'll give you an example of what I mean.

I buy petrol in a garage over the road. Loads of English people pass during the summer on their way to the Llyn Peninsula. There's this lady who takes money for the petrol & you've often got a huge que there. I've often stood queuing & noted how she virtually always starts the conversation in the language appropriate to the customer.

She might be able to spot cultural or class characteristics (most of the local customers would be working class), she might have a good & recognize most of the locals by sight - but she'd need a good memory, it's a very, very busy garage.
I get what you're saying, and I'm not suggesting you are fixated with stereotypes. But we are talking about the difference between not European celtic/saxon/scandinavian etc people not between north european and south european latin peoples were there is an obvious difference because of african eastern invasions and counter invasion. I would be hard pressed to tell the difference between an irishman an englishman a scot and a welshman and if you look at the genepool in this region its a right mixup of all 4 (invading soldiers don't keep there dicks in there kilts for long). So french man and english man decent chance of spotting the difference but within the brit isles way too hard.
 


Odyessus

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iIll give you another example. The French really annoy my wife, & we often visit the south of the country. She speaks perfectly good French, but when she's in France the locals will more often than not speak to her in English before she even opens her mouth. She can't understand why. She's half Welsh, half Irish, five foot nothing tall, blue eyes, very fair skin & dark hair.
I usually greet the occasional Japanese person I meet with my few words of Japanese. Perhaps not surprisingly, they never say: "How did you know I was Japanese?" :) On the other hand, they sometimes reply: "I'm Korean." :shock:

Obviously Europeans are much more closely related to each other than we are to Japanese, to whom we probably look more or less the same, but we are usually able to identify our own compatriots, as can the Japanese and Koreans. And French.
 

Cai

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I get what you're saying, and I'm not suggesting you are fixated with stereotypes. But we are talking about the difference between not European celtic/saxon/scandinavian etc people not between north european and south european latin peoples were there is an obvious difference because of african eastern invasions and counter invasion. I would be hard pressed to tell the difference between an irishman an englishman a scot and a welshman and if you look at the genepool in this region its a right mixup of all 4 (invading soldiers don't keep there dicks in there kilts for long). So french man and english man decent chance of spotting the difference but within the brit isles way too hard.
The point I was making wasn't really to do with stereotypes - I was remarking on people's ability to recognize very slight differences between people - not the rather large differences the word stereotype suggests.

There are differences between the genetic profile of Ireland or Wales to England - or to be more accurate Eastern England. Western Scotland has features in common with Ireland, while Eastern Scotland is more similar to Scandanavia & Eastern England.

if you're interested in this type of thing you might want to have a look at Stephen Oppernheimer's The Origins of the British.
 

Odyessus

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The point I was making wasn't really to do with stereotypes - I was remarking on people's ability to recognize very slight differences between people - not the rather large differences the word stereotype suggests.

There are differences between the genetic profile of Ireland or Wales to England - or to be more accurate Eastern England. Western Scotland has features in common with Ireland, while Eastern Scotland is more similar to Scandanavia & Eastern England.

if you're interested in this type of thing you might want to have a look at Stephen Oppernheimer's The Origins of the British.

And for anyone interested in his or her personal ancestry see here:


https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/index.html

It costs about €120 including shipping.

Genographic Project - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

ne0ica

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I get what you're saying, and I'm not suggesting you are fixated with stereotypes. But we are talking about the difference between not European celtic/saxon/scandinavian etc people not between north european and south european latin peoples were there is an obvious difference because of african eastern invasions and counter invasion. I would be hard pressed to tell the difference between an irishman an englishman a scot and a welshman and if you look at the genepool in this region its a right mixup of all 4 (invading soldiers don't keep there dicks in there kilts for long). So french man and english man decent chance of spotting the difference but within the brit isles way too hard.
Of course you can tell the difference between an Irishman and an Englishman unless your Japanese or something. Have you noticed how you can spot Americans who are Irish American.
 

crip sandwich

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The point I was making wasn't really to do with stereotypes - I was remarking on people's ability to recognize very slight differences between people - not the rather large differences the word stereotype suggests.

There are differences between the genetic profile of Ireland or Wales to England - or to be more accurate Eastern England. Western Scotland has features in common with Ireland, while Eastern Scotland is more similar to Scandanavia & Eastern England.

if you're interested in this type of thing you might want to have a look at Stephen Oppernheimer's The Origins of the British.
I understand that, and I totally understand the different peoples that inhabited these islands and their separate identities and physical features. My point is, that if you can find one "Irishman" one "English man" etc that has even the remotest chance after centuries of inter breeding of retaining these features apart from the others I would be amazed. For example, supposing there is a such thing as an English nose, how long does that nose have to be in ireland before it becomes a universal nose (i know its beginning to sound comical), so if I'm born in modern Ireland 600 years after my grandad brought his nose over from England and I inherit this nose, can you seriously say that I have "english" features.
 

Cai

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so if I'm born in modern Ireland 600 years after my grandad brought his nose over from England and I inherit this nose, can you seriously say that I have "english" features.
Do you have an English nose?

Seriously though, I agree with what you're saying. I suppose that I'm on about our subconcious tendency & ability to catogorize people. I suppose that there would have been an evolutionary advantage to be able to do this at some points in our ancient history.
 

delaad

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Anyone on here able to resurrect video of his presentation of RTE's answer to ITV's "University Challenge". The show was sponsored by the IT and wittily titled "Challenging Times". For a sign-off he individually commiserated with and congratulated each member of the competing losers and winners. It was legendarily embarrassing to witness.

Once seen, it was impossible to take him seriously again.
 

Odyessus

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I understand that, and I totally understand the different peoples that inhabited these islands and their separate identities and physical features. My point is, that if you can find one "Irishman" one "English man" etc that has even the remotest chance after centuries of inter breeding of retaining these features apart from the others I would be amazed. For example, supposing there is a such thing as an English nose, how long does that nose have to be in ireland before it becomes a universal nose (i know its beginning to sound comical), so if I'm born in modern Ireland 600 years after my grandad brought his nose over from England and I inherit this nose, can you seriously say that I have "english" features.

No, you wouldn't have English features; after 600 years, your ancestor's "nose gene" :) would have been well diluted by now, not to mention the fact that it could hardly have been radically different from other European noses in the first place.
 

crip sandwich

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Do you have an English nose?

Seriously though, I agree with what you're saying. I suppose that I'm on about our subconcious tendency & ability to catogorize people. I suppose that there would have been an evolutionary advantage to be able to do this at some points in our ancient history.
Funnily enough, I have been told i have a "Norman" nose. Whatever that looks like/ (mine i suppose).
 

merle haggard

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iIll give you another example. The French really annoy my wife, & we often visit the south of the country. She speaks perfectly good French, but when she's in France the locals will more often than not speak to her in English before she even opens her mouth. She can't understand why. She's half Welsh, half Irish, five foot nothing tall, blue eyes, very fair skin & dark hair.
Listen carefully , I shall say this only once .

you should encourage her to don a beret , a stripey jumper and a string of onions around her neck and dangle a Gauloise from her lip in a haughty manner . Possibly with a neckerchief- red polka dotted i think is the custom . That should easily fool them . A baguette under the arm wont hurt either . Along with a facial mole .

Sorted .
 

Cai

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Listen carefully , I shall say this only once .

you should encourage her to don a beret , a stripey jumper and a string of onions around her neck and dangle a Gauloise from her lip in a haughty manner . Possibly with a neckerchief- red polka dotted i think is the custom . That should easily fool them . A baguette under the arm wont hurt either . Along with a facial mole .

Sorted .
I don't think it would work. The Irish side of her family come from West Cork.
 

Odyessus

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Listen carefully , I shall say this only once .

you should encourage her to don a beret , a stripey jumper and a string of onions around her neck and dangle a Gauloise from her lip in a haughty manner . Possibly with a neckerchief- red polka dotted i think is the custom . That should easily fool them . A baguette under the arm wont hurt either . Along with a facial mole .

Sorted .

Yeah, that might work. Every time I see a guy wearing a leprechaun hat
and fake red beard I think he's Irish.
 

bayern

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I reckon he must have knocked back a bottle of whiskey before he wrote the article.. he is a demented old fool.
 

Almanac

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There's something a bit spooky about people who are interested in different racial characteristics and the like.
Especially about arsehead Myers who is a horse born out of a stable if you get my meaning.

Myarse once drivelled that he did not have the "honour" of belonging to the Irish race- despite the fact that both his parents are Irish Catholics. Ha ha ha petunia

Sorry Myers. Look at Clegg and Cameron. They are English. You are not. But this would only bother a weirdo such as yourself, a Bertie-lookalike wannabe, an aging wannabe at that, who knows his hour is over and that he is fading away into the void of unrecorded history.

Your embarassingly awkward attempts to write satire, foolish dives into technical subjects, and failed novels all serve as forceful reminders as to precisely why you remained nothing more than a hack who in latter years evolved into an old mouth-farting windbag.
 

gatsbygirl20

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Anyone on here able to resurrect video of his presentation of RTE's answer to ITV's "University Challenge". The show was sponsored by the IT and wittily titled "Challenging Times". For a sign-off he individually commiserated with and congratulated each member of the competing losers and winners. It was legendarily embarrassing to witness.

Once seen, it was impossible to take him seriously again.
That plus the fact that as he lobbed questions across at his hapless victims, he sat in his inquisitor's chair with his feet not touching the floor. Distinct loss of gravitas there. A modest little man with much to be modest about.
 

Odyessus

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That plus the fact that as he lobbed questions across at his hapless victims, he sat in his inquisitor's chair with his feet not touching the floor. Distinct loss of gravitas there. A modest little man with much to be modest about.

For all his faults, I don't think the height of his chair or the length of his legs comes into it.
 


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