Nasty knife attack in Kildare being treated as homophobic

Dearghoul

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I do know that things are much better for gay peope in Ireland, that's why the story shocked me.

I'm not sure a referendum on gay marriage would have passed in the UK, and I'm sure it wouldn't have passed with the percentage it did in Ireland. The progress Ireland has made on gay rights is astonishing.

I think I was shocked on a few levels.

For a start, I'm not daft enough to think that gay people don't still get subjected to some hassle. However a stabbing seemed particularly extreme.

I also thought that whilst places like Dublin tend to have more of a "gay scene" and so seem more tolerant, inevitably as a bigger city they also have more violence and crime. If it had happend in Dublin it would be just as bad but I'd probably have been less shocked.

So such a serious attack with a knife in what I understand to be a small town just seemed to be newsworthy.

And as I said, after my own (comparatively very, very trivial) encounter with a local (white, British accent, didn't ask his religion) feral youth, it had made me feel fed up with living in a big city and lusting after moving somewhere "nicer", which to a person born and raised in a big city I suppose inevitably is going to be a unrealistic vision of somewhere a lot smaller.

However it makes me wonder if it's just a daft fantasy - are there any "safe" areas anymore? Any small places where people know each other and you're not likely to get stabbed in the street?

It was really the brutality of the attack combined with the location which got to me.

I suppose it was really a thread about the false perception some city dwellers have that there's a nicer, more innocent place out there.

Perhaps there isn't.
I would think that was pretty out of the ordinary BsB.

Small towns are pretty peaceable in the main.

Some, for example, Kinsale, Youghal and Kenmare, when the Healy Raes arn't in town, manage to be both interesting and unthreatening.

Not Dunmanway however.

For now, lets call this random, and exceptional, and hope that's all it is.
 
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Rural

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A lot of Kildare is now "Dublin Suburbia", as is a lot of Wicklow and Meath. Dublin is the third smallest county in Ireland and yet that is where everyone works, hardly anyone lives in the city centre, so living accommodation has spread out to neighbouring counties.

There's this lovely Brummie Gay lad here (in Spain) who has been the victim of beatings, it's very sad no one deserves that and he's such a gentle man. But knives are intent to kill.

Someone commented to me last year about the Gay Pride Festivities "Hetrosexuals don't go about having parties because they are straight" and I asked him how many times was he beaten or shouted at because he was straight, the answer was never.
 

parentheses

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Knife crime does appear to be increasing.

There was a lad in Cork stabbed and killed just a few weeks ago.
 

talkingshop

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I was tuning in to listen to Livelive (for the first time ever - already heard someone say "yoot" for "youth" which delighted me.

Anyway the headlines before it referenced this attack.

I was shocked at how savage it seemed.

Is knife crime a big problem in Ireland?

I still have a rose-tinted view of Ireland, at least outside the big cities, as being quite a peaceful, low-crime place. Sigh.

I don't think knife crime is a big problem here. That attack was horrible, I hope they get the ones who did it.
 

The OD

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Knife crime is nowhere near as bad as the UK and society is getting far safer year on year.

The media would have us believe we are always just on the eve of destruction. We aren't.

However, I do feel for the naivety of one of those attacked when they said;

“Justice will be served ye dirty rotten scummy b**tards.”

No, it won't. This is Ireland and the attackers will certainly not serve more than a year or so in jail, if even.
Whats even worse is that if in the course of the struggle, you were to accidentally stab one of them, the state would come down on YOU like a tonne of bricks.
 

Blokesbloke

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I only drop in and comment sometimes and it is very nice to see that

Blokebokes and Rural are still here.
Only came back in the last few days!

I've been made very welcome by the majority!

Nice to see you too.
 

Strawberry

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I would say knife attacks of any kind are rare outside the cities, and homophobic ones even more so.

I'm not sure Kildare qualifies as outside the city any more though, Dublin seems to be swallowing all the small towns in the vicinity.
 

dizillusioned

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Knife crime is absolutely on the increase in Ireland. Any kid (it all seems to be younger generation now) who goes out with a knife needs to be dealt with properly by the courts... of course that is never going to happen in Ireland.

I do not care if someone is straight, bi, gay, assexual, They, Them, Zee or Zer.... no one should be getting stabbed. It is cowardly and the lowest of the low.
 

Dearghoul

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Knife crime is absolutely on the increase in Ireland. Any kid (it all seems to be younger generation now) who goes out with a knife needs to be dealt with properly by the courts... of course that is never going to happen in Ireland.

I do not care if someone is straight, bi, gay, assexual, They, Them, Zee or Zer.... no one should be getting stabbed. It is cowardly and the lowest of the low.
While not diminishing it's seriousness, and particularly this awful bloody case, knife crime seems to be on the decline, see my post 20.
 

midlander12

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I do know that things are much better for gay peope in Ireland, that's why the story shocked me.

I'm not sure a referendum on gay marriage would have passed in the UK, and I'm sure it wouldn't have passed with the percentage it did in Ireland. The progress Ireland has made on gay rights is astonishing.

I think I was shocked on a few levels.

For a start, I'm not daft enough to think that gay people don't still get subjected to some hassle. However a stabbing seemed particularly extreme.

I also thought that whilst places like Dublin tend to have more of a "gay scene" and so seem more tolerant, inevitably as a bigger city they also have more violence and crime. If it had happend in Dublin it would be just as bad but I'd probably have been less shocked.

So such a serious attack with a knife in what I understand to be a small town just seemed to be newsworthy.

And as I said, after my own (comparatively very, very trivial) encounter with a local (white, British accent, didn't ask his religion) feral youth, it had made me feel fed up with living in a big city and lusting after moving somewhere "nicer", which to a person born and raised in a big city I suppose inevitably is going to be a unrealistic vision of somewhere a lot smaller.

However it makes me wonder if it's just a daft fantasy - are there any "safe" areas anymore? Any small places where people know each other and you're not likely to get stabbed in the street?

It was really the brutality of the attack combined with the location which got to me.

I suppose it was really a thread about the false perception some city dwellers have that there's a nicer, more innocent place out there.

Perhaps there isn't.
Unfortunately I heard on the radio this morning that there was also a homophobic attack in Dublin (along the Dodder river) at the weekend. I think we have nothing to be complacent about here. Both attacks, by the way, occurred in urban not rural areas.
 

Rural

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I would say knife attacks of any kind are rare outside the cities, and homophobic ones even more so.

I'm not sure Kildare qualifies as outside the city any more though, Dublin seems to be swallowing all the small towns in the vicinity.
Knife crime is absolutely on the increase in Ireland. Any kid (it all seems to be younger generation now) who goes out with a knife needs to be dealt with properly by the courts... of course that is never going to happen in Ireland.

I do not care if someone is straight, bi, gay, assexual, They, Them, Zee or Zer.... no one should be getting stabbed. It is cowardly and the lowest of the low.
It's the lowest of the low, it's also premeditated because someone has a weapon on them with the intention to harm or kill and it should be treated as such by the courts, but it's not.

Picking on an easy target is the game and it strikes me that things haven't changed much since Declan Flynn was murdered in St. Anne's Park in Dublin, which ignited the first Gay Pride March in Dublin.

By-the-way, the lads who murdered Declan Flynn were let off with a caution from the Judge and they then had a victory thing on O'Connell Street, which disgusted a lot of people.
 

reg11

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However it makes me wonder if it's just a daft fantasy - are there any "safe" areas anymore? Any small places where people know each other and you're not likely to get stabbed in the street?

It was really the brutality of the attack combined with the location which got to me.

I suppose it was really a thread about the false perception some city dwellers have that there's a nicer, more innocent place out there.

Perhaps there isn't.
Sure there are plenty of such places. I say half the population here live in such places. Which begs the question: are there no such places in England? Surely , there are?

In big cities one will have many interactions with others, casual and otherwise. For every bad interaction, I think there's more opportunity for positive ones. Except in small places of course one is less likely to have such a bad experience, but one is also less likely to have a good experience. Such places nothing much happens good or bad.

Newbridge isn't such a small place in Irish terms and it has a lot of spillover from Dublin and dare I say it , some of that spillover are problems originating in Dublin. I'm saying that not knowing anything about the criminals in this case.
 

Strawberry

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It's the lowest of the low, it's also premeditated because someone has a weapon on them with the intention to harm or kill and it should be treated as such by the courts, but it's not.

Picking on an easy target is the game and it strikes me that things haven't changed much since Declan Flynn was murdered in St. Anne's Park in Dublin, which ignited the first Gay Pride March in Dublin.

By-the-way, the lads who murdered Declan Flynn were let off with a caution from the Judge and they then had a victory thing on O'Connell Street, which disgusted a lot of people.
Jesus. Just looked that case up, I see the ringleader was later sentenced to ten years for raping a woman who was seven months pregnant. Sickos.
 

Emily Davison

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Rural what was the victory thing on Patrick’s street?

Strawberry we often mentioned the Fairview murder case whenever we discussed marriage equality. The main issue was the judge. But clearly to be gay and open about it you risked trouble, that’s why many gay men had to be very careful at that time. Norris did a lot, somehow lost in later events.
 

Rural

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Rural what was the victory thing on Patrick’s street?

Strawberry we often mentioned the Fairview murder case whenever we discussed marriage equality. The main issue was the judge. But clearly to be gay and open about it you risked trouble, that’s why many gay men had to be very careful at that time. Norris did a lot, somehow lost in later events.
It was on O'Connell Street. The lads got off scott free after murdering Declan Flynn and they had a "Victory Parade" on O'Connell Street afterwards.

This was back in the early 80s and it disgusted many people.
 

Strawberry

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Rural what was the victory thing on Patrick’s street?

Strawberry we often mentioned the Fairview murder case whenever we discussed marriage equality. The main issue was the judge. But clearly to be gay and open about it you risked trouble, that’s why many gay men had to be very careful at that time. Norris did a lot, somehow lost in later events.
The judge was so bad I can't call him what he deserves to be called, now I'm a mod and can't swear anymore.

Even the Army knew better, they dishonourable discharged those who were in the Air Corps. And the Irish Army was hardly a bastion of gay acceptance at the time.
 

Blokesbloke

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Jesus. Just looked that case up, I see the ringleader was later sentenced to ten years for raping a woman who was seven months pregnant. Sickos.
The judge should reflect on how much his decision influenced the further crime.

No doubt the scum thought he was untouchable after he'd literally got away with murder.

I wonder if that judge is still alive and if he ever reflects on his actions.

He must really have despised gay people to allow someone to murder one and get away with it.

Even your average homophobic judge would probably have blanched at doing that.
 


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