National Broadband - is this amazing leadership, electioneering or a corrupt waste of tax - what do you think?

The NBP as is currently proposed looks like a bad deal for the tax payers

  • Yes

    Votes: 25 73.5%
  • No

    Votes: 9 26.5%

  • Total voters
    34

redneck

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I wonder how much the costs investigation will cost us in the broadband project - in 10 years time.
 


jmcc

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He said no such thing. Either you're a liar, or you're colossally stupid. Which is it?
The screenshot of the press release from the FG site is posted upthread. Perhaps you might have a word with your dimwitted buddy and explain the Internet to him?
 

hiding behind a poster

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Well 250 max.

The regulations on advertising this stuff is poor. Companies advertise the maximum speeds but small print says actual speeds dependent on other factors, distance from the cabinet etc


At peek times when everyone on your road is home and using the Internet it's probably not hitting that speed. But not a drop that you would notice.

Some people have packages were it is noticeable

Nbp approached this in a smart way. Europe defines high speed broadband as min 30mbps. So nbp saying that is the minimum speed it can go to, if it drops below that at any time its not high speed, and by the looks of it that standard has to increase over time.
Given what much of this broadband will probably be used for, might that be a Freudian slip?
 

hiding behind a poster

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To be fair, this has piqued the nation's collective interest like few other initiatives over the past decade - Irish Water being that last one that I would consider comparable.

The fact that the government lack the killer argument, just like they did on IW, demonstrates their absolute incompetence - people don't need to be an "expert" to see that investing €3bn into a company that only has to pony up €200m, but having no asset at the end of all that is bad business.
You really haven't a clue, do you? The State will be paying the company for work done, as and when it's done. You know, a contract.
 

hiding behind a poster

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silence is not acquiescence
Ehhhh, we're talking about other telecoms/infrastructure companies here, not the citizens of North Korea. Given the current publicity about the NBP, any company that could do the same job for less would most definitely be letting the world know.
 

jmcc

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So why do FGers think it is acceptable for one of Denis O'Brien's companies to be involved in this?
 

hiding behind a poster

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So why do FGers think it is acceptable for one of Denis O'Brien's companies to be involved in this?
Why shouldn't it be acceptable?
 

jmcc

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Try reading your own link, you muppet. At no point does O'Donovan call for a ban on web browsers.
O'Donovan is the typical class of thick gombeen that your FG attracts. You probably even look up to him as some kind of expert on this whole Internet thing. He called for a crackdown on Internet browsers.
 

redneck

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Giving broadband to rural Ireland is a good idea. It is just that Fine Gael in particular have a long history of botching up such projects. And also a history of cronyism and corruption.
 

hiding behind a poster

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I think the key point is waiting, should the plan go ahead as proposed or put on hold until a better option comes along? I have my doubts about the satellite proposal, especially one owned by Amazon. Its interesting that those who object to private ownership of fibre lines have no problem with depending on the goodness of Amazon to provide a cheaper service.
Exactly. Suppose there were no petrol stations in rural Ireland, and the cost of building and maintaining them outweighed the benefits to the oil companies. Does the government subsidise them now in order to drive economic activity, or wait on the basis that in a few years we might - might - all be using hydrogen fuel cells?
The answer is obvious.
 

hiding behind a poster

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Esat and avoiding paying CGT on its sale. Payments to FG minister Michael Lowry.
Lowry is 20 years out of FG, no tax law was broken re CGT, and what was wrong with Esat?
 


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