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National Broadband - is this amazing leadership, electioneering or a corrupt waste of tax - what do you think?


The NBP as is currently proposed looks like a bad deal for the tax payers

  • Yes

    Votes: 13 72.2%
  • No

    Votes: 5 27.8%

  • Total voters
    18

hiding behind a poster

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The same f*cking moron FGer who wanted to ban web browsers. Perhaps someone should point out to the idiot that the Brexiteers won the referendum.
He said no such thing. Either you're a liar, or you're colossally stupid. Which is it?
 


hiding behind a poster

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The Broadsheet even has the screenshot where your dimwitted friend called for the crackdown.


View attachment 18062
And I still can't find any call for a ban in there. Liar.
 

hiding behind a poster

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But we are not getting a choice in these cases. One bidder for the nbp is not a choice, it should have ended when that became the case.
And what would that achieve?
 

hiding behind a poster

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There is a lot of posing as usual. Personally, I don't care, I have 250Mbps from Virgin along with cable TV. However I spent my working life outside Dublin and I know what people have to put up with, especially those running businesses. I'm quite happy to see my taxes spent to improve internet services throughout the country at the least possible cost, so if there's a better option, let's go for it.
And there's the key. Nobody, for all the faffing about, has proposed an option that is legal, as good as what's on offer, and any cheaper.
 

Orbit v2

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Never mind, I found it. About 16% of us play games on a pc.

"How Many Gamers Are There? There are approximately 2.2 billion gamers in the world. Out of the estimated 7.6 billion people living on earth, as of July 2018, that means almost a third of people on this planet are gamers. Out of those 2.2 billiongamers, 1.2 billion of those who play games are playing games on a PC.Jul 20, 2018
Not just gaming, but latency is bad for telephony as well. I remember the bad old days when transatlantic phone calls went over satellites and it was horrendous. I use a VOIP telephone over fibre and you couldn't tell the difference with the old phone service. Providing fibre to everyone in an area has the advantage that the old copper wires will be defunct and can be taken out eventually.

Also, not suggesting your fibre line wasn't zapped by lightning. Just it should be less of a problem than with old phone lines which actually conduct electricity. Nobody in the cities uses wireless just because of the risk of lightning to their DSL or cable
 

hiding behind a poster

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Maybe but until the commercial details are available who knows, if they decided to flip it the prospective buyers would have full access to that data. Imagine the furore if it was flipped at a big profit.
But if that potential exists, other bidders would be in already, trying to get the contract from the state in order to do precisely what you're suggesting - and they could tender lower than Granaham McCourt, while still, by your logic, making a healthy profit.
So why isn't that happening?
 

Orbit v2

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You have a point, but if the standard to be set for receiving a government tender is to be that every last detail of a company's finances has to be public knowledge, then nobody will bid for State work. Not because there's necessarily anything wrong with their finances, but because no company will open its books way above what's currently required under company law in order to satisfy the prurient curiosity of talking heads like O'Toole and the dweebs who populate social media (present company excepted) - their competitors would love it, they'd get to see everything.
At some point the public and media have to be capable of accepting that in the absence of evidence to the contrary, a tendering process like this is carried out properly and with suitable diligence, whereas much of the commentary on here seems lazily based on the assumption that if nothing looks wrong, something still must be.
The most important is the amount the taxpayer has to pay each year. We need visibility of that now, looking forward. Not good enough to find out about it after the fact. The taxpayer has the right to know is it X 100 million per year for 25 years or is it more front-loaded, which presumably it is to some extent. What if it's 1 billion a year for the first three years. That would be catastrophic for other capital spending.

Less important is the share of equity versus borrowings, though we do have that already it seems.
 

redneck

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I wonder how much the costs investigation will cost us in the broadband project - in 10 years time.
 

jmcc

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He said no such thing. Either you're a liar, or you're colossally stupid. Which is it?
The screenshot of the press release from the FG site is posted upthread. Perhaps you might have a word with your dimwitted buddy and explain the Internet to him?
 

hiding behind a poster

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Well 250 max.

The regulations on advertising this stuff is poor. Companies advertise the maximum speeds but small print says actual speeds dependent on other factors, distance from the cabinet etc


At peek times when everyone on your road is home and using the Internet it's probably not hitting that speed. But not a drop that you would notice.

Some people have packages were it is noticeable

Nbp approached this in a smart way. Europe defines high speed broadband as min 30mbps. So nbp saying that is the minimum speed it can go to, if it drops below that at any time its not high speed, and by the looks of it that standard has to increase over time.
Given what much of this broadband will probably be used for, might that be a Freudian slip?
 

hiding behind a poster

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To be fair, this has piqued the nation's collective interest like few other initiatives over the past decade - Irish Water being that last one that I would consider comparable.

The fact that the government lack the killer argument, just like they did on IW, demonstrates their absolute incompetence - people don't need to be an "expert" to see that investing €3bn into a company that only has to pony up €200m, but having no asset at the end of all that is bad business.
You really haven't a clue, do you? The State will be paying the company for work done, as and when it's done. You know, a contract.
 

hiding behind a poster

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silence is not acquiescence
Ehhhh, we're talking about other telecoms/infrastructure companies here, not the citizens of North Korea. Given the current publicity about the NBP, any company that could do the same job for less would most definitely be letting the world know.
 

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