National Broadband - is this amazing leadership, electioneering or a corrupt waste of tax - what do you think?

The NBP as is currently proposed looks like a bad deal for the tax payers

  • Yes

    Votes: 25 73.5%
  • No

    Votes: 9 26.5%

  • Total voters
    34

Orbit v2

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2010
Messages
12,461
You missed my point which is that parochialism is not confined to rural areas. Metro will be a hugely expensive project, many multiples of the cost of rural broadband and will take years to complete and will benefit only a portion of the population. Its a good example of how worthless a cost benefit analysis is when deciding on big infrastructure projects - Ardnacrusha made no financial sense when it was built.
I think cost-benefit analyses are often worthless because they are nearly always wrong. Laughably so in the case of Metrolink. The benefit will be orders of magnitude greater than what the bean counters have said.

It will be considerably less for the broadband plan, but I still think it's worth doing. Investment in infrastructure is more often than not beneficial overall (notable exceptions like the Western rail corridor aside).

The parochialism thing is a different issue. I despair sometimes that the worst objectors to infrastructure in Dublin are from other people in Dublin eg the likes of the comfortable well-off types in Ranelagh led by Michael McDowell. So, if your point is that Dublin people are just as parochial as the rest of the country, then I agree with it.
 


wombat

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Messages
35,563
I think cost-benefit analyses are often worthless because they are nearly always wrong. Laughably so in the case of Metrolink. The benefit will be orders of magnitude greater than what the bean counters have said.
The problem with infrastructure is that it often makes no financial sense when it is built - Ardnacrusha being a good example. A more recent example was the ESB power station at Aghada which was built to create a market for natural gas so that the Kinsale field would be developed. It did not make economic sense to burn natural gas to make electricity at that time but without that station there was no reason to develop the Kinsale field.
 

Baron von Biffo

Moderator
Joined
May 16, 2007
Messages
18,175
What I find most disappointing about the NB plan is that there's been no proactive planning around the potential to do just that - take commuters off the roads, reduce road building projects, develop employment hubs around the initial delivery locations, etc.

The government have taken a very "Field of Dreams" approach - "If you build it, he will come" - to the benefits...almost as if they don't want to be judged by the success of the project.
One of the best ways to take cars off the roads would to introduce severe disincentives to private car ownership in Dublin.

A massive increase in road tax and a congestion charge for any car moving inside the M50 that doesn't leave Dublin for at least 6 hours of the business day might encourage the Dubs to use the public transport we bought for them.
 


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