National Children’s Hospital will be one of the most expensive buildings ever built

Patslatt1

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There is also the issue of over speccing. This hospital will have more beds in it than the 3 children’s hospitals currently have, put together.

It might seem sensible to have more beds than we currently do now but all the movement in paediatric care, with advances in diagnostic technology etc means that in an up do date hospital the number of beds required should be significantly reduced. But Dept of Health seemingly wont entertain anything other than having more beds.

It is also widely rumoured that the board have caved in completely to the consultants in provision of facilities etc

And yet to come, but the picture has yet to fully emerge, in terms of staffing it appears they are gearing up to have more people working in the new hospital than currently work in the existing 3. Whatever about bringing all the existing nursing staff into the new site, it beggars belief that, with modern IT, they need anything remotely approaching the same number of admin staff.

But the long standing practice in the hse - establish, and maintain, feather bedding looks set to continue.
100 YEARS OF CAPACITY
The manager of a few big Dublin private hospital projects completed on time was interviewed by Newstalk last year. He estimated the new childrens hospital would be at full capacity in only ten years, whereas it should have enough capacity for 100 years. No doubt the physical constraints of the present site are to blame.
The solution to the constraints is the CPO of about eight acres of houses adjacent to the hospital. At a house price of say 300,000 euros, the cost might be 20 million,a modest sum compared to existing hospital costs.The residential area hasn't historical legacy or architectural appeal, so the owners would be glad to sell for a generous price.
Parking spaces for hospital staff, patients and associates could be solved by creating a car park or parks, possibly 21 stories high rise, within five to ten minutes drive, with a 24/7 service of shuttle buses.
 


Patslatt1

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Something has gone horribly wrong on the assessment of cost side, more probably multiple things, but I would go with a combination of simple incompetence and policy inertia first until I see evidence of anything more malign. There are probably people out there in internetland who have been involved in such projects and can spot a few glaring errors made in the process.

Megaprojects usually have cost and time overruns:


But we probably agree the NCH had to be done? Other criteria for assessing success have been suggested:


Although they are mainly retrospective. Here are a few suggestions for bucking the cost overrun trend:


In the end, all I can do is wish you good luck. You’ll gradually forget about the horrendous cost if the place functions well.
LACK OF GOVERNMENT INCENTIVES TO BE FRUGAL
Nobody in government gets better paid or promoted for being frugal on big projects. The incentive for egotistical political masters is to build conspicuous and ostentatious projects that serve as monuments eg Bertie Bowl proposal for a soccer stadium in a location remote from Dublin's tourist amenities.
Taxpayers just have to suck it up and when cost overruns are serious enough, that should influence their votes.
 

wombat

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Project creep likely occured with the tacit permission of the board in charge, the HSE and Department of Health.
Nothing tacit about it, they approved the changes. My point about not comparing construction costs of a foreign built hospital with overall project costs is because for example, extensions built in Tallaght and Blanchardstown are included in the project cost but are unrelated to the St James construction.
 

brughahaha

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Nothing tacit about it, they approved the changes. My point about not comparing construction costs of a foreign built hospital with overall project costs is because for example, extensions built in Tallaght and Blanchardstown are included in the project cost but are unrelated to the St James construction.
So you think an extension in Blanch and Tallaght explains away 1.2 billion and counting in over runs ? (on an initial projection of 800 million inclusive of those extensions)
 

wombat

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So you think an extension in Blanch and Tallaght explains away 1.2 billion and counting in over runs ? (on an initial projection of 800 million inclusive of those extensions)
No, I'm pointing out that some of the cost comparisons with overseas projects compare an apple with a bag of apples.
 


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