National Gallery of Ireland asked to take down 'anti-semitic' painting



Karloff

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Levellers

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I fail to the artistic merit of that painting.

But it should not be taken down because some religious fundamentalist objects. If it is anti-Semitic then an information blurb should be erected next to it explaining the context.
 

Karloff

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Re the second Punch Cartoon - there are two Irish figures in the Cartoon - Gladstone is protecting Hibernia, the Irish Maiden , from the monster of Extremism

Here is another one:

Depicted as either a simple minded female or as a violent cowardly ape... Those were the two classic depictions of natives by colonists. Either helpless weak and virtuous (if depicting natives who behaved as they wanted them to) or violent, anarchic and subhuman (if depicting natives hostile to their agenda).
 

GDPR

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Depicted as either a simple minded female or as a violent cowardly ape... Those were the two classic depictions of natives by colonists. Either helpless weak and virtuous (if depicting natives who behaved as they wanted them to) or violent, anarchic and subhuman (if depicting natives hostile to their agenda).
I'm not sure that Cruimh would have been a fan of the Land Bill after all he considers the Alliance Party the "Appeasement Party of Northern Ireland" today.
 

Lúidín

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If the Ahrish are given Home Rule, the wops and the brownies will want it too.
 

ne0ica

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Had the painting mocked Christianity the complainants would be laughed off with "Its art get over it".
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
I agree with posters who say the context should be outlined on a card next to the painting.

Start censoring artistic works, however painful to the eye they may be, and you open a Pandora's Box of expectations for the future on galleries that they simply won't be able to handle.
 

Fritzbox

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Re the second Punch Cartoon - there are two Irish figures in the Cartoon - Gladstone is protecting Hibernia, the Irish Maiden , from the monster of Extremism...
From one form of Irish extremism - Ultramontanism - but there were plenty of other types of extremism to be found in Ireland in the 19th century. Shades of extremism which Punch magazine always conveniently forgot or ignored.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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Dublin City Council flew a flag of the Palestinian Authority, which is a regime that routinely and aggressively advocates anti-Jewish vitrol.

Not a word of concern from the "left".

In fact the left in DCC were behind the decision.

Wascuirto has a thread on the PA, and it's ruthless and continual campaign of vicious hatred of Jewish people.

Silence from the PC brigade.

I have no problem with the removal of the painting. In fact I agree with it being removed.

The same applies to the morons in DCC flying bthe flag of a regime that hate as the central basis of much of what it is about, the PA.
Right, Ted
 

Strawberry

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I agree with posters who say the context should be outlined on a card next to the painting.

Start censoring artistic works, however painful to the eye they may be, and you open a Pandora's Box of expectations for the future on galleries that they simply won't be able to handle.
Plus its educational. Its not doing anyone, including Jewish people, any favours to hide this stuff away and pretend there were no German artists who engaged in anti-Semitism throughout history. You have to know about the past in order to learn from it.
 

redhead

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There's an article in the ST today about the NGI being asked to take down a painting by the German painter Emil Nolde because it appears to feature an anti-semitic trope.

The painting, which is called 'Martyrdom II' depicts what appears to be a couple of hook-nosed characters laughing at the crucifixion.

Emil Nolde was a nazi sympathiser but ironically found his work banned by the NSDAP because it was considered modern 'degenerate' art. The Nazis favoured classicism.

The article says that some members of the public complained about the painting being anti-semitic but they are not named.

I don't think NGI should take down the painting, as it's bowing to censorship and would be against freedom of expression. Someone may start complaining that any art depicting the crucifixion is anti-semitic.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/...noldes-anti-semitic-crucifixion-art-95ppl27bb
Is it going to ruin one of your regular visits to the National Gallery? I'll bet you were so looking forward to seeing it.
 

Karloff

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From one form of Irish extremism - Ultramontanism - but there were plenty of other types of extremism to be found in Ireland in the 19th century. Shades of extremism which Punch magazine always conveniently forgot or ignored.
I think it's Fenianism and the social justice campaign the Land League John Bull is 'protecting' 'Hibernia' from not some clerical movement.

It's even written on him.
 

Fritzbox

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I think it's Fenianism and the social justice campaign the Land League John Bull is 'protecting' 'Hibernia' from not some clerical movement.

It's even written on him.
I'm referring to the second cartoon on post no. 15. 'Ultramontan' is written on the - 'Irishman'.
 

leftsoc

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Right. But in this painting that's exactly what's happening. It's anti-semitic. He was an anti-semite. That doesn't mean his work didn't have impact or should be hidden away.

You can watch Triumph of the Will and appreciate the film making and effectiveness of it without sympathising with it's goals.
Yeats was a Blueshirt, Knut Hamsun was a Nazi sympathiser, but we can't hide them away, can we?
 

IvoShandor

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yes
Yeats was a Blueshirt, Knut Hamsun was a Nazi sympathiser, but we can't hide them away, can we?
Ezra Pound was a Fascist sympathiser and anti-semite, so was the French writer Céline, and they are only two of many. In the visual arts we have fewer examples, but Edgar degas was an anti-semite (and Picasso championed Stalin..just as bad in my book). As for music, we all know about Wagner. We can't re-write or hide the past to cater for present sensibilities.
 
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McTell

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There's an article in the ST today about the NGI being asked to take down a painting by the German painter Emil Nolde because it appears to feature an anti-semitic trope.

The painting, which is called 'Martyrdom II' depicts what appears to be a couple of hook-nosed characters laughing at the crucifixion.

Emil Nolde was a nazi sympathiser but ironically found his work banned by the NSDAP because it was considered modern 'degenerate' art. The Nazis favoured classicism.//

Disapproval by the nazis helped Nolde's reputation. Problem is that his ironic overstatement is seen as a statement.

When we hear that some people objected to the painting, some people objected to this, some people objected to that, how come they are never named?
 

bob3344

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Yeats was a Blueshirt, Knut Hamsun was a Nazi sympathiser, but we can't hide them away, can we?
Not to mention Francis Stuart.

Hide/Ban works & it implies that their message is so persuasive that once viewed people will be converted to fascism or whatever.
 


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