Nationalist group opposed to Uncontrolled immigration may set up party

neutral_lurker

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According to the Sunday Tribune this group is planning on becoming a political party- do you think they would be successful or is too controversial a stance to base a party on? What would the Irish media reaction be, its the first I've heard of them so would they get any coverage.


It aims to be the next Irish political party and is bound to be controversial.



A new grouping, billing itself as the Irish National Party (INP), is dedicated to the "immediate deportation of all illegal immigrants and asylum seekers who have had their applications rejected."



It also believes Irish culture and identity is being eroded, with "record levels of immigration and an influx of so-called 'asylum seekers'... leading to the development of minority communities in our cities and increasing levels of social isolation in our towns and villages."

Yet David Barrett, chairman of the nascent organisation – which is not yet registered as a political party – says it opposes racism and is not "anti-immigrant."



"(We) rather seek to establish greater control over the immigration process. We recognise there is and always will be a need for some level of immigration but believe a more vigorous system needs to be put in place," he said.


Nationalist group opposed to immigration may set up party
 


factual

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According to the Sunday Tribune this group is planning on becoming a political party- do you think they would be successful or is too controversial a stance to base a party on? What would the Irish media reaction be, its the first I've heard of them so would they get any coverage.


It aims to be the next Irish political party and is bound to be controversial.



A new grouping, billing itself as the Irish National Party (INP), is dedicated to the "immediate deportation of all illegal immigrants and asylum seekers who have had their applications rejected."



It also believes Irish culture and identity is being eroded, with "record levels of immigration and an influx of so-called 'asylum seekers'... leading to the development of minority communities in our cities and increasing levels of social isolation in our towns and villages."

Yet David Barrett, chairman of the nascent organisation – which is not yet registered as a political party – says it opposes racism and is not "anti-immigrant."



"(We) rather seek to establish greater control over the immigration process. We recognise there is and always will be a need for some level of immigration but believe a more vigorous system needs to be put in place," he said.


Nationalist group opposed to immigration may set up party
Sounds like a shameful political party that will not get support.
 

eoghanacht

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ibis

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Well, if it can't get support on p.ie then it will fail utterly in the real world.
 

Clanrickard

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There is no uncontrolled emigration in this country so there is no need for such a party.
 

Sync

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They can form, but they won't get the votes. The mistake they'll make is to look at the success groups in the UK have had, which has an entirely different situation. There you have decades of immigration leading to the ghettoisation of some areas, and areas which went from 80% English in the 70s and 80s to about 40% now. In the UK there's a target market to appeal to, here in Ireland that target market is much much smaller.

Possibly if immigration were to be somehow mishandled for the next decade or so there would be scope for someone to glean success from it, but right now it doesn't seem like a runner.
 

SevenStars

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Well, if it can't get support on p.ie then it will fail utterly in the real world.
This "party" has been announcing that it is setting up for years now with no one noticing. They even had a few posters up around Glasnevin at one stage. If there is one political force that is actually weaker than the extra-parlimentary left in Ireland its the racial-nationalist/revolutionary right.
 

Dr Pat

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It was inevitable that people would get sick and tired of multicultural loolaa land being endlessly promoted by the professional multicults earning their big salaries, leftie one worlders and assorted D4 "liberal" types.

Don't know much about this group but fair play to them.
 

SevenStars

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It was inevitable that people would get sick and tired of multicultural loolaa land being endlessly promoted by the professional multicults earning their big salaries, leftie one worlders and assorted D4 "liberal" types.

Don't know much about this group but fair play to them.
Im in no fan of middle class liberals and not very liberal myself but did you ever consider the fact that most people can have human empathy with other humans who have been forced to leave their country for economnic reasons? The problemn isnt immigrants its the Free State business class which exploits them and us.
 

Nodin

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It also believes Irish culture and identity is being eroded, with "record levels of immigration and an influx of so-called 'asylum seekers'... leading to the development of minority communities in our cities and increasing levels of social isolation in our towns and villages."
Adoption of English slang, fashion, attitudes. Adoption of American slang, fashion, attitudes. Even the TV programmes on the national broadcaster are copies of English ones....But who do they whinge about? 'Not racist' my arse.
 

jmcc

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In some areas, such a party could do well. But in most areas it would not. But with this recession, it could find tapping into a resentment against "asylum seekers" and welfare tourists a lot easier than some in the mainstream political parties would like. I'm sure that the Irish Times will be shrieking from the faux Tudor spires of D4 about it but the people who would vote for such a party wouldn't take any notice of the Irish Times. The big threat of such a party would be to Sinn Fein.

Regards...jmcc
 

factual

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Surely the immigrants should be welcomed and their human rights respected?
 

eoghanacht

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Im in no fan of middle class liberals and not very liberal myself but did you ever consider the fact that most people can have human empathy with other humans who have been forced to leave their country for economnic reasons? The problemn isnt immigrants its the Free State business class which exploits them and us.
Ah, empathy for refugee's, easy to label them ALL welfare tourist's and scammer's.

That way when we drag them away from their lives and return them to their war torn homeland's, we'll keep repeating that to ourselves so it doesn't impinge on our sense of christianity.

Having empathy, does that make me a liberal?
 

slx

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What worries me is that controls on Irish broadcasters which are supposed to provide fair and balanced coverage, sometimes work to give groups like this disproporationately huge amounts of air time.

For example, if a major Irish radio or television broadcaster were to have a debate on immigration it's quite likely that someone from this party will end up with a 50:50 share of the air time with someone from a party which has actual electoral support i.e. Fianna Fail, Fine Gael, Labour, the Greens, Sinn Fein, Socialists or even independents.

To my mind anyway, that tends to give little pressure groups e.g. Libertas a massive platform and grossly unfair amounts of airtime as broadcasters desperately try to provide what they consider to be balanced coverage. In their attempt to do this, they can end up making a small pressure group seem as big as a major political party or grouping that has serious support.

I think it is very important that anyone who is opposed to such a party should ensure that they complain to any broadcasters who do this and try to push any debates into a representative round-table discussion i.e. Vincent Browne or Front Line style, rather than giving them tabloid coverage in one-on-ones on Newstalk etc.

The last thing we need is an Irish version of the BNP suddenly getting huge media coverage because broadcasters are compelled by crudely implemented Broadcasting Authority of Ireland rules to provide 'balance', or because they see it as controversial and jump on it in a tabloid kind of way.
 

eoghanacht

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It was inevitable that people would get sick and tired of multicultural loolaa land being endlessly promoted by the professional multicults earning their big salaries, leftie one worlders and assorted D4 "liberal" types.

Don't know much about this group but fair play to them.
Google the name, they were started on stormfront, fair play to them eh?
 

FutureTaoiseach

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Fair play to them. Note that they oppose racism:
Sunday Tribune said:
Yet David Barrett, chairman of the nascent organisation – which is not yet registered as a political party – says it opposes racism and is not "anti-immigrant.
I am sick of the PC, left-liberal consensus on illegal-immigration in Leinster House (no doubt influenced by a legal-profession on the make).
six said:
For example, if a major Irish radio or television broadcaster were to have a debate on immigration it's quite likely that someone from this party will end up with a 50:50 share of the air time with someone from a party which has actual electoral support i.e. Fianna Fail, Fine Gael, Labour, the Greens, Sinn Fein, Socialists or even independents.

To my mind anyway, that tends to give little pressure groups e.g. Libertas a massive platform and grossly unfair amounts of airtime as broadcasters desperately try to provide what they consider to be balanced coverage. In their attempt to do this, they can end up making a small pressure group seem as big as a major political party or grouping that has serious support.
Hold on a second. Libertas most certainly did not get 50:50 airtime during either the local elections or Lisbon II, because the rules were rigged unconstitutionally to violate the McKenna/Coughlan judgements the second-time around. The 50:50 rules - insofar as they exist - only apply to referendums under the McKenna/Coughlan judgements. And even they are not being implemented. A new McKenna-type challenge is needed.
Eoghanacht said:
Ah, empathy for refugee's, easy to label them ALL welfare tourist's and scammer's.

That way when we drag them away from their lives and return them to their war torn homeland's, we'll keep repeating that to ourselves so it doesn't impinge on our sense of christianity.

Having empathy, does that make me a liberal?
I prefer to deport them to another EU state, as sometimes allowed under the Dublin Convention. The choice you pose is not a factual reflection of the choice the State faces as regards where failed asylum-seekers can be deported to. They can also be deported to previous EU countries of entry. Pamela Izevbekhai claims to have entered Ireland via Amsterdam. A Sunday newspaper claims she entered Ireland after entering the UK on a tourist-visa. Last year, 200+ failed asylum-seekers were transferred to another EU state under the Dublin II Regulations. So it isn't just a question of remaining in Ireland or returning to some 'war-torn' land. And with over 90% of asylum-seekers failing their applications, it is very naive of you to think so. :roll:

As for party-electoral support, it is wrong to suggest that just because someone votes for a party, they are subscribing to all of the party's policies. The Citizenship referendum and Lisbon I are textbook examples of Labour supporters going against the party line. During the 2004 referendum, 70% of SF voters also voted yes, in opposition to party-policy. There is a growing and very unhealthy tendency in Leinster House towards consensus, and that undermines the availability of electoral-choice, with elections at risk of becoming more contests of personality than true expressions of electoral-opinion on policy-areas. The Establishment in this country increasingly converge on a 'human-rights' agenda in a manner actually intended to enrich vested-interests such as solicitors. Gerard Hogan SC made an excellent point on "This Week" yesterday when he pointed out that - on the ground - judges will decide what the proposed 'children's rights' constitutional amendment means if passed in a constitutional referendum. I predict that as with the citizenship-loophole in our constitutional prior to 2004, a children's-rights amendment will be abused by bogus asylum-seekers and their legal-teams, possibly resulting in a creation of a new-loophole making it virtually impossible to deport illegal immigrants.

Bear in mind that this party is only calling for the deportation of illegal-immigrants. That contrasts sharply with the BNP agenda of repatriation of non-whites. The dichotomy between public-opinion on immigration on the one hand, and the liberal-consensus in Leinster House on the other hand necessitates an immigration-control party in this country. The Citizenship referendum, Nice I and Lisbon I illustrate that the elect often get too far ahead of those who vote for them in advocating positions not shared by their electorate. Such a dichotomy is unhealthy for democracy, and indicative of an all-pervasive elitism in Leinster House - that Ivory Tower on Kildare Street where vested interests (particularly some in the legal-profession, publicans etc.) meet to connive to elevate their greed over the interests of the public - cloaked in the verbiage of "national interest". :roll:
 
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slx

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Don't get me wrong, I am all for a proper healthy debate on immigration issues. What I am totally opposed to is a party which has a single anti-foreigner / xenophobic agenda.

Also, under European law and under Irish equality law, can an Irish political party (or as it is now a voluntary organisation) restrict membership to only Irish citizens ?

Also, how does one define a political party in Irish law ? Can anyone set one up or do you have to have a specific number of members and an candidates registered to contest elections ?
 


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