Nationwide bike schemes

Roll_On

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Given the success of the Dublin Bike scheme, shouldn't the smaller cities have something similar. Smithfield, Dublin will soon have two bike stations, one at the luas stop and one at the northern end of the square. A similar scheme would do wonders to integrate public transport everywhere, especially in the likes of Cork, where the train station is a bit of a trek from the city centre. Have other city councils even considered it in their framework plans for the future?
Cork CC is considering light rail as a transport option, without even trying a simple bike scheme first.
 


H

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Given the success of the Dublin Bike scheme, shouldn't the smaller cities have something similar. Smithfield, Dublin will soon have two bike stations, one at the luas stop and one at the northern end of the square. A similar scheme would do wonders to integrate public transport everywhere, especially in the likes of Cork, where the train station is a bit of a trek from the city centre. Have other city councils even considered it in their framework plans for the future?
Cork CC is considering light rail as a transport option, without even trying a simple bike scheme first.
Of course they should!

As long as a they keep far away from the lousy and very sleazy deal that was cooked up by councillors that promoted the horrible and dangerous signage in Dublin

Be careful for what you wish for, Dub the "onside" sleazy councillors and of course DCC's wingnut "Traffic Commitee" that agreed to the signage for a pathetic sum of money that even the useless NRA said was a public danger in relation to their placement.
 

cimon9999

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This is a great idea.

Of course they should, would leave more road for my land rover.
Might get another one......
I wish you luck in your bidding war against the subsidised Chinese middle class, with their strengthening Yuan and large foreign reserves. If the punt nua comes in, the price of driving is going up. Here's what the latest IEA World Energy Outlook states:

"The oil price needed to balance oil markets is set to rise, reflecting the growing insensitivity of both demand and supply to price. The growing concentration of oil use in transport and a shift of demand towards subsidised markets are limiting the scope for higher prices to choke off demand through switching to alternative fuels. And constraints on investment mean that higher prices lead to only modest increases in production."

Current price is $90/barrel:

 
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drummed

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This is a great idea.



I wish you luck in your bidding war against the subsidised Chinese middle class, with their strengthening Yuan and large foreign reserves. If the punt nua comes in, the price of driving is going up. Here's what the latest IEA World Energy Outlook states:

"The oil price needed to balance oil markets is set to rise, reflecting the growing insensitivity of both demand and supply to price. The growing concentration of oil use in transport and a shift of demand towards subsidised markets are limiting the scope for higher prices to choke off demand through switching to alternative fuels. And constraints on investment mean that higher prices lead to only modest increases in production."

Current price is $90/barrel:

Fine so but tell me this, if i live on a farm in the middle of the country what should i do with a bike? Not much use for ploughing i'd say and considering i'm snowed in thanks no doubt to global warming, how do i travel without a 4wdrive? Been out in the last hour towing a local in her nissan micra, she was pleased to see a land rover coming i can tell you with her kids freezing in the back of the micra stuck on a frozen hill. Should i have told her to get a bike and driven home?
 

cimon9999

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Fine so but tell me this, if i live on a farm in the middle of the country what should i do with a bike? Not much use for ploughing i'd say and considering i'm snowed in thanks no doubt to global warming, how do i travel without a 4wdrive? Been out in the last hour towing a local in her nissan micra, she was pleased to see a land rover coming i can tell you with her kids freezing in the back of the micra stuck on a frozen hill. Should i have told her to get a bike and driven home?
Fair play for helping out. No easy answer for that, which is part of the reason that the demand curve is so vertical. What you can do is get a hybrid 4x4. For about a €3-5k premium it reduces fuel consumption by 20-30%. With a conventional 4x4 at say 8 l/100km, a hybrid at 6 l/100km, diesel at say €1.30/l, and travel of 20,000 km/yr, you save 400 litres per year and €500, paying for itself in 6-10 years. That's probably too long a payback period and so your alternatives are to drive less, drive slower, or else out-bid these guys, who only have one car per 30 people at present, but would like one:

 

kellboy

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Fair play for helping out. No easy answer for that, which is part of the reason that the demand curve is so vertical. What you can do is get a hybrid 4x4. For about a €3-5k premium it reduces fuel consumption by 20-30%. With a conventional 4x4 at say 8 l/100km, a hybrid at 6 l/100km, diesel at say €1.30/l, and travel of 20,000 km/yr, you save 400 litres per year and €500, paying for itself in 6-10 years. That's probably too long a payback period and so your alternatives are to drive less, drive slower, or else out-bid these guys, who only have one car per 30 people at present, but would like one:

60% veg and 40% kerosene saves more than €500p.a :D
 

drummed

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Yeah, i've seen those hybrid's around. Problem here again i'm afraid. I need a 3.5tonne towing capacity, the max allowed by law for a 4wd. Only a small number of choices and none of the hybrids come close, most of those have a 1-1.5tonne towing rating so i think the technology to carry heavy loads long distance is not available without diesel. Most of the 4wd's on the road are a waste of space, taking kids to school, going shopping, etc. That gives all owners a bad name which is unfair. I think it's unfair that people who genuinely need these cars are lumped in with the yuppies who buy these things.
 

keeptalking

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I thought all those bikes kept getting stolen so that they had to abandon the scheme.

Problem with Ireland and bikes is that, generally, it's hilly, it is rainy and windy a lot which makes cycling a pretty miserable experience most of the time.
 

Expose the lot of them

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I thought all those bikes kept getting stolen so that they had to abandon the scheme.

Problem with Ireland and bikes is that, generally, it's hilly, it is rainy and windy a lot which makes cycling a pretty miserable experience most of the time.
Actually very few of the bikes have been stolen onlike Paris where very large numbers disappeared.

Shame that more of them have not disappeared as it might reduce the number of nutters wobbling dangerously around the streets of Dublin, earphones, no helmets, breaking lights, riding on footpaths, and that is only Taliban Ryan. It is time that all bikes had to be registered and carry identification plates and cyclists should be obliged to carry insurance and obey the rules of the road.
 

Roll_On

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I thought all those bikes kept getting stolen so that they had to abandon the scheme.
err, no. 2 bikes were stolen in Dublin, and they were recovered the next day. The scheme is very popular.

Problem with Ireland and bikes is that, generally, it's hilly, it is rainy and windy a lot which makes cycling a pretty miserable experience most of the time.
urban areas are generally not that hilly, with the exception of cork's northside.
 

Cooperate for freedom

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Just got my €1,000 voucher for Bike to work scheme! Can't wait to get cycling!!
 

alonso

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CfF, glad to hear it... Take it handy out there
 

biteback

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I thought all those bikes kept getting stolen so that they had to abandon the scheme.

Problem with Ireland and bikes is that, generally, it's hilly, it is rainy and windy a lot which makes cycling a pretty miserable experience most of the time.
Don't know where you heard that. They are actually extending the scheme from 500 to 5,000 bikes over the next few years and from DCU on the north to UCD on the southside. Its been a major success - hence the expansion.

I've been surprised the amount of people cycling around the city even in the last month or two with the cold weather.

The scheme would be ideal for Galway and Belfast though it'll be years before it happens I'm sure given the slow pace these things take to happen in Ireland.
 

Tweek

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Galway effectively *needs* a system like this. Smallish flat city, choked with traffic and a very poor bus system.

Cork is too hilly for it to be of much use, though it could be worth a punt for the flatter bit of the city.
 


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