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Nazi Irish-language broadcasts: Glaoch ón Tríú Reich


FloatingVoterTralee

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We're all familiar with Lord Haw Haw, but an interesting TG4 documentary about Hans Hartmann, who came to Ireland to study Old Irish, before returning to Berlin and setting up a radio station broadcasting as Gaeilge. Two-thirds of Irish were neutral but pro-Allies, but it's clear from the interviews that there was a significant undercurrent of sympathy with the Germans, if not necessarily espousing their politics.
 

Glaucon

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Another cracking programme from TG4, where would we be culturally without them; I had no idea that this section of the Nazi propaganda machine existed, and I've studied quite a lot relating to Nazi Germany. Dr. Wigger's level of Irish, and accent, put most of the country to shame.
 

Cai

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Oddly during WW2 the BBC put out a regular news programme in Welsh - all over the UK - not just in Wales.
 

borntorum

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Interesting program. The German presenter was clearly upset at times; the legacy of the war continues to haunt that country
 

puffin

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Where was the harbour he was taking depth soundings,bad eggs the lot of them.
 

MDaniel

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Oddly during WW2 the BBC put out a regular news programme in Welsh - all over the UK - not just in Wales.
After Irish Independence, Ireland started a weekly programme in Welsh.
 

iago1709

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Apr 2, 2011
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This programme is being repeated tonight. First I'd heard of it, to be honest. An-spéisiúil ar fad.
 

owedtojoy

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Francis Stuart, one of our most renowned writers was also sending pro-German broadcasts to Ireland from Berlin.
Seems radio broadcasts was the Internet of the day.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Stuart
Yes, we gave Stuart an honoured artistic position and a state pension for broadcasting hate-filled propaganda to our country about "financiers" (discreet code for Joos).

Maybe we should have given Hartmann annual free tickets to the All-Ireland Hurling Final for broadcasting Nazi muck to our people , also? It seems unjust that he got nothing compared to the big dig-out we gave to the other Nazi.
 

Beachcomber

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We're all familiar with Lord Haw Haw, but an interesting TG4 documentary about Hans Hartmann, who came to Ireland to study Old Irish, before returning to Berlin and setting up a radio station broadcasting as Gaeilge. Two-thirds of Irish were neutral but pro-Allies, but it's clear from the interviews that there was a significant undercurrent of sympathy with the Germans, if not necessarily espousing their politics.


No doubt they were trying to appeal to the IRA-supporting element in Irish society at the time.
 

The Field Marshal

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No doubt they were trying to appeal to the IRA-supporting element in Irish society at the time.
Not necessarily.
You wrongly equate being anti British with being pro IRA.

Most Irish people during the period concerned held a profound distrust of all British political intentions.
Indeed most of them also and correctly blamed Britain for many of Ireland's then internal problems from IRA activism to an ailing economy and the festering sore of partition.
Add on the ugly anti Catholic sectarianism running riot in Northern Ireland and you might begin to get the picture.

The proof of this culminated in the extraordinary spectacle of Dail Eirean approving the countries neutral status with only one dissenting vote.
 

DJP

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We're all familiar with Lord Haw Haw, but an interesting TG4 documentary about Hans Hartmann, who came to Ireland to study Old Irish, before returning to Berlin and setting up a radio station broadcasting as Gaeilge.
I didn't see the doc but are you sure it was not an Irish language programme as opposed to an Irish language radio station?
 

duine n

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Aug 29, 2006
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6,344
We're all familiar with Lord Haw Haw, but an interesting TG4 documentary about Hans Hartmann, who came to Ireland to study Old Irish, before returning to Berlin and setting up a radio station broadcasting as Gaeilge. Two-thirds of Irish were neutral but pro-Allies, but it's clear from the interviews that there was a significant undercurrent of sympathy with the Germans, if not necessarily espousing their politics.
Seo é gan dabht!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MILibMEWu_Q



Seems radio broadcasts was the Internet of the day.
:)



After Irish Independence, Ireland started a weekly programme in Welsh.
???????????????????????

Not necessarily.
You wrongly equate being anti British with being pro IRA.

Most Irish people during the period concerned held a profound distrust of all British political intentions.
Indeed most of them also and correctly blamed Britain for many of Ireland's then internal problems from IRA activism to an ailing economy and the festering sore of partition.
Add on the ugly anti Catholic sectarianism running riot in Northern Ireland and you might begin to get the picture.

The proof of this culminated in the extraordinary spectacle of Dail Eirean approving the countries neutral status with only one dissenting vote.
:)
 

Karloff

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Jun 5, 2015
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7,205
World War 2 is still shrouded in 'right and wrong' points of view and so cannot be studied seriously yet, it may take centuries.

Too much of the victor's propaganda still clouds the issues, for example Japan apologising for WW2 yesterday, only the losing countries are expected to apologise when all committed atrocities - this is an example of that 'good' and 'evil' narrative - although some would add that Japan like German remain militarily occupied to this day.
 

Gealt

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Feb 7, 2011
Messages
345
We can all decide today whether we are happy with the outcome or whether we yearn for national socialism.

If it takes historians 'centuries' to decide on the outcome then that will not concern us.
 
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