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New Gaeltachtaí- why on earth not?


DJP

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The Sunday Times "Home" section today has an article detailing several options the Governments has with the nation's 120,000 vacant new houses. The fifth is Gaeltacht areas:

"Gaeltacht areas

Why: the boundaries for the Irish-speaking areas were set in legislation in 1956, so the time could be right to introduce new gaeltacht areas.

Viability: This would involve allocating housing to Irish-speaking families to encourage a new gaeltacht, which would lead to the establishment of gaelscoils and other Irish-speaking enterprises. The gaeltacht quarter in Belfast houses 20,000 people, and is supported by a new corporation."


Why on earth not? The new areas- estates- could be located within a reasonable distance of gaelscoileanna.
 

dónal na geallaí

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The Sunday Times "Home" section today has an article detailing several options the Governments has with the nation's 120,000 vacant new houses. The fifth is Gaeltacht areas:

"Gaeltacht areas

Why: the boundaries for the Irish-speaking areas were set in legislation in 1956, so the time could be right to introduce new gaeltacht areas.

Viability: This would involve allocating housing to Irish-speaking families to encourage a new gaeltacht, which would lead to the establishment of gaelscoils and other Irish-speaking enterprises. The gaeltacht quarter in Belfast houses 20,000 people, and is supported by a new corporation."


Why on earth not? The new areas- estates- could be located within a reasonable distance of gaelscoileanna.

Or some local schools could become Gaelscoileanna,starting with nurseries and gradually working up? depends on sufficient demand of course.
 

DJP

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I think we should first work on building up the gaelscoileanna as they are currently set up. We need more second-level gaelscoileanna or gaelcholáistí in particular and it is now harder to set up gaelscoileanna at primary level.
 

Tomas Mor

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Another daft idea. Probably if they put up a sign saying "Gaeltacht", all will be well. Though if it worked it might be better than relocating methadone and drug addicts to those ghost esttates built during the Celtic folly era..
 

wretchedwilbur

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I think we should first work on building up the gaelscoileanna as they are currently set up. We need more second-level gaelscoileanna or gaelcholáistí in particular and it is now harder to set up gaelscoileanna at primary level.
Great point !

But what about those cats today ? Watching Kilkenny hurl is a sublime experience.
 

fluffykontbiscuits

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Or some local schools could become Gaelscoileanna,starting with nurseries and gradually working up? depends on sufficient demand of course.
Think it would be a good idea making the schools that way and then in a few years perhaps turn them into Gaeltachtai but for the mean time I think there is more need to get people into housing without making them Gaeltachts.
 

redneck

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Ceapaim go bhfuil sé suiomh maith. Tá cúplá áiteanna in mBAC an bhfuil Gaelige ann. Baile na Manach (Monkstown) mar sámpla.
 

DJP

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Ceapaim go bhfuil sé suiomh maith. Tá cúplá áiteanna in mBAC an bhfuil Gaelige ann. Baile na Manach (Monkstown) mar sámpla.
We already have 120,000 empty houses. It would cost money to buy land in Monkstown to set up a gaeltacht there. And the area is settled anyway- I don't think there is any land left to be built on there although I could be wrong.
 

locke

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The main problem is that the ghost estates are just that, estates.

If there was an entire ghost town that had been created with the potential to run all facilities as a gaeltacht town, then it is potentially a good idea.

But as long as it's just an estate, it will quickly be overwhelmed by the English speakers in the broader area.
 

LiamORaiste

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igaeilge.wordpress.com
Why wait for the Government to do it? If there's an interest in such a scheme why doesn't a group of Gaeilgeoirí get together and approach Nama and say: we'll take that estate off your hands for 10% of whatever price it was you were looking for and we'll transform it into a viable community? Isn't that the way to go - why wait for a government which appears to be paralysed to act?
 

DJP

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If the estate(s) were big though and located near gaeltachtaí.
I should have said located near gaelscoileanna.


Why wait for the Government to do it? If there's an interest in such a scheme why doesn't a group of Gaeilgeoirí get together and approach Nama and say: we'll take that estate off your hands for 10% of whatever price it was you were looking for and we'll transform it into a viable community? Isn't that the way to go - why wait for a government which appears to be paralysed to act?
Ideally the official route would be the best, and easiest.
 

Tomas Mor

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There is a ghost estate near me, I am terrified that druggies from inner city may be placed there. I would be delighted if gaelgeoiri relocated there.
 

dónal na geallaí

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Ceapaim go bhfuil sé suiomh maith. Tá cúplá áiteanna in mBAC an bhfuil Gaelige ann. Baile na Manach (Monkstown) mar sámpla.
Cad é sin,an Ghaeltacht Goggins,a redneck? :lol:

The idea is sound though,but,as other posters have remarked,you would need other facilities and a nearby Gaelscoil.
 

antiestablishmentarian

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I'd be sympathetic to the idea but I think the first step needs to be stabilisation of the existing gaetacht and the preservation of the language there as the spoken tongue.
 

antiestablishmentarian

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Community centres with bars.




I agree. This is happening with the 20 Year Strategy for the Irish Language though.
Fair enough. If the ghost estates where beside the existing gaeltachtaí as you said, to provide a native speaking hinterland of sorts, then they should be taken over and set up as gaeltachtaí. Whats needed is serious public investment in facilities such as you mentioned community centres etc, but also any state agencies there should employ staff who only operate through Irish so that knowledge of the language becomes an essential for community interaction. There should also be efforts made to provide cultural alternatives to the existing predominantly english culture such as the provision of new radio services and the setting up of book clubs, music clubs etc.
 

DJP

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Fair enough. If the ghost estates where beside the existing gaeltachtaí as you said, to provide a native speaking hinterland of sorts, then they should be taken over and set up as gaeltachtaí.
Agreed.

If Pat Carey was carrying out a survey he should ask people where they wanted to live without being too specific except for in Dublin perhaps. I mean like North-West Meath; South-East Westmeath etc. Then build on that demand. And there is a demand for new houses for young Irish speakers in most Gaeltacht areas particularly in Donegal.


Whats needed is serious public investment in facilities such as you mentioned community centres etc, but also any state agencies there should employ staff who only operate through Irish so that knowledge of the language becomes an essential for community interaction.
That is increasingly happening in the Gaeltacht with the Official Languages Act.

There should also be efforts made to provide cultural alternatives to the existing predominantly english culture such as the provision of new radio services and the setting up of book clubs, music clubs etc.
These would happen naturally with the community centres.
 
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