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New residential developments with Irish names in the North


DJP

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I started a thread on this in the Gaeilge forum a while ago.

In every county in the Republic- bar Wicklow and Dublin- there is a significant (in many, many cases a large) number of new residential developments being named i nGaeilge amháin today.

Why hasn't the trend caught on in NI?

OK nobody really expects there to be many/any property developers from a Unionist background to be naming their developments in Irish but presumably you would think that the property developers from a Nationalist background would.

Is it that that there aren't many developers from a Nationalist background in the North?

Up until relatively recently it was illegal to name residential developments i nGaeilge amháin in the North. Maybe it's just a case of spreading the word amongst Nationalist developers that they can do so now?

I know there are a couple of developments around Newry named i nGaeilge amháin, but you would think that there would be more.
 


ArtyQueing

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
I started a thread on this in the Gaeilge forum a while ago.

In every county in the Republic- bar Wicklow and Dublin- there is a significant (in many, many cases a large) number of new residential developments being named i nGaeilge amháin today.

Why hasn't the trend caught on in NI?

OK nobody really expects there to be many/any property developers from a Unionist background to be naming their developments in Irish but presumably you would think that the property developers from a Nationalist background would.

Is it that that there aren't many developers from a Nationalist background in the North?

Up until relatively recently it was illegal to name residential developments i nGaeilge amháin in the North. Maybe it's just a case of spreading the word amongst Nationalist developers that they can do so now?

I know there are a couple of developments around Newry named i nGaeilge amháin, but you would think that there would be more.
People are too scared
 

DJP

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12,442
ArtyQueing said:
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
I started a thread on this in the Gaeilge forum a while ago.

In every county in the Republic- bar Wicklow and Dublin- there is a significant (in many, many cases a large) number of new residential developments being named i nGaeilge amháin today.

Why hasn't the trend caught on in NI?

OK nobody really expects there to be many/any property developers from a Unionist background to be naming their developments in Irish but presumably you would think that the property developers from a Nationalist background would.

Is it that that there aren't many developers from a Nationalist background in the North?

Up until relatively recently it was illegal to name residential developments i nGaeilge amháin in the North. Maybe it's just a case of spreading the word amongst Nationalist developers that they can do so now?

I know there are a couple of developments around Newry named i nGaeilge amháin, but you would think that there would be more.
People are too scared
If you're living in a Nationalist area I don't see the problem.
 

ArtyQueing

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Messages
302
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
ArtyQueing said:
[quote="Darren Mac an Phríora":3j5za409]I started a thread on this in the Gaeilge forum a while ago.

In every county in the Republic- bar Wicklow and Dublin- there is a significant (in many, many cases a large) number of new residential developments being named i nGaeilge amháin today.

Why hasn't the trend caught on in NI?

OK nobody really expects there to be many/any property developers from a Unionist background to be naming their developments in Irish but presumably you would think that the property developers from a Nationalist background would.

Is it that that there aren't many developers from a Nationalist background in the North?

Up until relatively recently it was illegal to name residential developments i nGaeilge amháin in the North. Maybe it's just a case of spreading the word amongst Nationalist developers that they can do so now?

I know there are a couple of developments around Newry named i nGaeilge amháin, but you would think that there would be more.
People are too scared
If you're living in a Nationalist area I don't see the problem.[/quote:3j5za409]

Darren - and you a knowledgeable man.

Put the address down on any piece of paper and you give away what you are. let us say you are going for a job. You put down your address and not only are you a fenian but an uppity fenian.

It will cause problems.
 

DJP

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ArtyQueing said:
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
ArtyQueing said:
[quote="Darren Mac an Phríora":4o1swbtz]I started a thread on this in the Gaeilge forum a while ago.

In every county in the Republic- bar Wicklow and Dublin- there is a significant (in many, many cases a large) number of new residential developments being named i nGaeilge amháin today.

Why hasn't the trend caught on in NI?

OK nobody really expects there to be many/any property developers from a Unionist background to be naming their developments in Irish but presumably you would think that the property developers from a Nationalist background would.

Is it that that there aren't many developers from a Nationalist background in the North?

Up until relatively recently it was illegal to name residential developments i nGaeilge amháin in the North. Maybe it's just a case of spreading the word amongst Nationalist developers that they can do so now?

I know there are a couple of developments around Newry named i nGaeilge amháin, but you would think that there would be more.
People are too scared
If you're living in a Nationalist area I don't see the problem.
Darren - and you a knowledgeable man.

Put the address down on any piece of paper and you give away what you are. let us say you are going for a job. You put down your address and not only are you a fenian but an uppity fenian.

It will cause problems.[/quote:4o1swbtz]

If there was a trend in the North of naming developments in Irish most Unionists wouldn't mind employing someone with a Gaeilge address. The North is already 90% divided.
 

st333ve

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Joined
Jul 18, 2006
Messages
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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
I started a thread on this in the Gaeilge forum a while ago.

In every county in the Republic- bar Wicklow and Dublin- there is a significant (in many, many cases a large) number of new residential developments being named i nGaeilge amháin today.

Why hasn't the trend caught on in NI?

OK nobody really expects there to be many/any property developers from a Unionist background to be naming their developments in Irish but presumably you would think that the property developers from a Nationalist background would.

Is it that that there aren't many developers from a Nationalist background in the North?

Up until relatively recently it was illegal to name residential developments i nGaeilge amháin in the North. Maybe it's just a case of spreading the word amongst Nationalist developers that they can do so now?

I know there are a couple of developments around Newry named i nGaeilge amháin, but you would think that there would be more.
The local councils would go mental, the developers would get bad publicity from the anti-Irish fascist media.
They would call it an attack on their British identity etc...

It might be legal but the rotweilers are still there.
The housing estate would be open to vandalism from loyalists.
 

DJP

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st333ve said:
The local councils would go mental, the developers would get bad publicity from the anti-Irish fascist media.
They would call it an attack on their British identity etc...

It might be legal but the rotweilers are still there.
The housing estate would be open to vandalism from loyalists.
Again the North is already 90% divided- 90% of the people living there live within their own community not in mixed communities or the other community.

As I said there are already a couple named i nGaeilge in Newry.

The estates wouldn't be open to vandalism from loyalists if they were in nationalist areas although you would get an exception in border line areas is dócha.
 

ArtyQueing

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Darren - people are too scared - they know the ramifications
 

DJP

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ArtyQueing said:
Darren - people are too scared - they know the ramifications
Of course it would be inadvisable to name them in Irish in border line areas like Nationalist West and North Belfast but I don't see the problem in Nationalist areas in rural Fermanagh, Tyrone, Armagh and Derry for example.
 

alonso

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What about the Shankill?
Isn't that an Irish name? I know what you're all saying, and yes it's a bastardised Anglicisation similar to the one up the road from me in Dublin, but i still like the irony.

My own opinion is that placenaming is one of the primary realms where the Irish language can flourish.
 

DJP

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alonso said:
What about the Shankill?
Isn't that an Irish name? I know what you're all saying, and yes it's a bastardised Anglicisation similar to the one up the road from me in Dublin, but i still like the irony.

My own opinion is that placenaming is one of the primary realms where the Irish language can flourish.
Yea and it's important that we get comhstádas for both languages enshrined on our road signage in the Republic for that to happen.
 

essexboy

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
alonso said:
What about the Shankill?
Isn't that an Irish name? I know what you're all saying, and yes it's a bastardised Anglicisation similar to the one up the road from me in Dublin, but i still like the irony.

My own opinion is that placenaming is one of the primary realms where the Irish language can flourish.
Yea and it's important that we get comhstádas for both languages enshrined on our road signage in the Republic for that to happen.
Already happening in Derry City signs.
 

Oppenheimer

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
I started a thread on this in the Gaeilge forum a while ago.

In every county in the Republic- bar Wicklow and Dublin- there is a significant (in many, many cases a large) number of new residential developments being named i nGaeilge amháin today.

Why hasn't the trend caught on in NI?

OK nobody really expects there to be many/any property developers from a Unionist background to be naming their developments in Irish but presumably you would think that the property developers from a Nationalist background would.

Is it that that there aren't many developers from a Nationalist background in the North?

Up until relatively recently it was illegal to name residential developments i nGaeilge amháin in the North. Maybe it's just a case of spreading the word amongst Nationalist developers that they can do so now?

I know there are a couple of developments around Newry named i nGaeilge amháin, but you would think that there would be more.
Is it not obvious? Considering that the general consensus is that developers are greedy b**tards they would not want to restrict their market.
 

DJP

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Joined
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Oppenheimer said:
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
I started a thread on this in the Gaeilge forum a while ago.

In every county in the Republic- bar Wicklow and Dublin- there is a significant (in many, many cases a large) number of new residential developments being named i nGaeilge amháin today.

Why hasn't the trend caught on in NI?

OK nobody really expects there to be many/any property developers from a Unionist background to be naming their developments in Irish but presumably you would think that the property developers from a Nationalist background would.

Is it that that there aren't many developers from a Nationalist background in the North?

Up until relatively recently it was illegal to name residential developments i nGaeilge amháin in the North. Maybe it's just a case of spreading the word amongst Nationalist developers that they can do so now?

I know there are a couple of developments around Newry named i nGaeilge amháin, but you would think that there would be more.
Is it not obvious? Considering that the general consensus is that developers are greedy b**tards they would not want to restrict their market.
Again the North is already 90% divided. That's a fact. It's not a figure I picked out of my head. I don't see the problem with naming developments in Irish in Nationalist areas.
 

Oppenheimer

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Darren Mac an Phríora said:
Oppenheimer said:
[quote="Darren Mac an Phríora":p5eesfnf]I started a thread on this in the Gaeilge forum a while ago.

In every county in the Republic- bar Wicklow and Dublin- there is a significant (in many, many cases a large) number of new residential developments being named i nGaeilge amháin today.

Why hasn't the trend caught on in NI?

OK nobody really expects there to be many/any property developers from a Unionist background to be naming their developments in Irish but presumably you would think that the property developers from a Nationalist background would.

Is it that that there aren't many developers from a Nationalist background in the North?

Up until relatively recently it was illegal to name residential developments i nGaeilge amháin in the North. Maybe it's just a case of spreading the word amongst Nationalist developers that they can do so now?

I know there are a couple of developments around Newry named i nGaeilge amháin, but you would think that there would be more.
Is it not obvious? Considering that the general consensus is that developers are greedy b**tards they would not want to restrict their market.
Again the North is already 90% divided. That's a fact. It's not a figure I picked out of my head. I don't see the problem with naming developments in Irish in Nationalist areas.[/quote:p5eesfnf]

I understand - I am merely stating - why would I reduce my market by naming developments in Irish when I know that is bound to turn some (albeit small minded Unionist buyers) away?
 

factual

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I think it would be good to invest in a better future up there by building more integrated housing communities.
 

GDPR

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How are the uncultured fools supposed to know its not Scots Irish etc instead of Republican Irish ;) ? I think the best solution is to have dual names on signs similar to how 'Baile Atha Cliath' is accepted as 'Dublin' on any addressed letter.
 

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