New York Times on the return of mass emigration to Ireland

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The best and brightest are leaving, send-offs, or 'wakes', for friends are becoming increasingly common, and 120,000 are expected to leave in the coming year. This might or might not be 'regression to the mean' after the few years of immigration we just had, but it is an abject indictment of the utter squandering of the wealth that available, even if on the back of an unsustainable casino economy, under Bertie Ahern's dismal 'leadership'.

And there are risks, too, that Ireland’s best and brightest — the very people who could help turn things around — are leaving.

Edwina Shanahan, the marketing manager of Visafirst, a company that helps emigrants settle abroad, said there might be some truth to this. “A lot of the countries giving visas are quite choosy,” she said. “You need to be highly qualified and have recent job experience to get into Australia. They are getting the best among us.”
Well, at least Ahern's children, or the children of the nepotistic 'dynasties' that have helped f*** up this country, will be okay. As were their parents. And their grandparents.

Nothing changes...

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/21/world/europe/21irish.html?partner=rss&emc=rss
 


kodak

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The best and brightest are leaving, send-offs, or 'wakes', for friends are becoming increasingly common, and 120,000 are expected to leave in the coming year. This might or might not be 'regression to the mean' after the few years of immigration we just had, but it is an abject indictment of the utter squandering of the wealth that available, even if on the back of an unsustainable casino economy, under Bertie Ahern's dismal 'leadership'.



Well, at least Ahern's children, or the children of the nepotistic 'dynasties' that have helped f*** up this country, will be okay. As were their parents. And their grandparents.

Nothing changes...

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/21/world/europe/21irish.html?partner=rss&emc=rss
maybe this time they will get what they deserve:mad:
 

Sham96

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I always have a problem with some of these articles. They assume that everybody leaving Ireland has a Phd when that is not the case. We need to make sure EVERY Irish person who emigrates has some sort of network to help them out. We have to help each other out. Whether we live in Ireland. Whether we are moving away from home. Very. very important.
 
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Remember, emigration is the great safety valve, the export of the best young leaving the mediocre, the criminals, and the nepotists behind to f*** us up again. The article refers to the claim by FF that the drop in numbers signing on is a good economic sign when in reality it's a sign of haemorrhage of people. The bastards are at the same gutter spin that they were at in the 1980s, capitalizing on the misery of the emigrants and their families in order to bullsh1t their way out of being exposed for the corrupt incompetents they are.
 

Sham96

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Remember, emigration is the great safety valve, the export of the best young leaving the mediocre, the criminals, and the nepotists behind to f*** us up again. The article refers to the claim by FF that the drop in numbers signing on is a good economic sign when in reality it's a sign of haemorrhage of people. The bastards are at the same gutter spin that they were at in the 1980s, capitalizing on the misery of the emigrants and their families in order to bullsh1t their way out of being exposed for the corrupt incompetents they are.
It sickens me Toxic. It really does. I am not a violent man but....
 

Ó Donnchadha

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I can remember hearing stories of the wakes. My Mother and Fathers side were both from Ireland. Growing up in Boston, we lived as if they never left.

I know times are tough in Ireland, and I have my personal feelings, that the people of Ireland need to STAND, and accept nothing less. If it means anarchy for a while, then so be it. In New Hampshire they have a motto "Live free or die" and I think most Americans adhere to it, though I question the latest generation.

My Mother and Father both suffered through the great depression here, meaning they missed dinners, slept without heat, and had no assistance from the government. But they persevered.

I know some of the more Liberal Irish, sneer at us Irish Americans. But if things get tough, we will always welcome you here. many came over in the 80's, and of course before. You can always find help here in Boston, and NYC. We have constituent services, that will help.

here is the the link to the Irish Pastoral Center. They can offer Immigration help, and other services. You can hide and assimilate in Boston easily.

Home | Irish Pastoral Centre, Boston

Here is help in NYC. The Emerald Isle Immigration Center


Emerald Isle Immigration Center Helping Immigrants NY


here is the Irish Apostolate with links to most major cities that have Irish presence.

Welcome to the Irish Apostolate USA


I can follow up with more help and advice, my private mailbox is always open.

Dia Mo Chairde
 

Cruimh

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Remember, emigration is the great safety valve, the export of the best young leaving the mediocre, the criminals, and the nepotists behind to f*** us up again. The article refers to the claim by FF that the drop in numbers signing on is a good economic sign when in reality it's a sign of haemorrhage of people. The bastards are at the same gutter spin that they were at in the 1980s, capitalizing on the misery of the emigrants and their families in order to bullsh1t their way out of being exposed for the corrupt incompetents they are.
Still, you will be left with the Church .....

I look at Ireland, and I ask myself: “who else could lead?”
The politicians are new at the game; we have few economists, our professional people leave.
Who stays? We do.
Bruce Francis Biever, Religion, Culture andValues:A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Motivational Factors in Native Irish and American Irish Catholicism (New York, 1976, which is a reprint of Biever’s 1965Ph.D. Dissertation), 229.
 

mistercrabs

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Why is it that when there's any sort of economic downturn in this country, the immediate reaction is for people to leave? Does this happen in most other countries? When Argentina had a crisis, Argentines stayed and helped rebuild their country. If you ask me, it's an abrogation of the responsibilities of democratic citizenship for people to abandon ship when they can't keep themselves in the style to which they're accustomed. It's part of the selfish streak that ************************************ up our country so much in the first place.
 

CanadianCelt

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Why is it that when there's any sort of economic downturn in this country, the immediate reaction is for people to leave? Does this happen in most other countries? When Argentina had a crisis, Argentines stayed and helped rebuild their country. If you ask me, it's an abrogation of the responsibilities of democratic citizenship for people to abandon ship when they can't keep themselves in the style to which they're accustomed. It's part of the selfish streak that ************************************ up our country so much in the first place.
Don't feed the troll
 

Ó Donnchadha

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Don't feed the troll
Word Dat. :D

I notice that one of the poster who responded prior to my post, was one of the biggest Loyalist and Catholic baiters on this forum.

Hey I hope the best for the Irish people. I also will try to post helpful links for those that chose to take to boats. Slang for emigration.

But for the grace of God go I, and go we did. We made a life here, and the Irish helped make our History.
 

Sham96

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Why is it that when there's any sort of economic downturn in this country, the immediate reaction is for people to leave? Does this happen in most other countries? When Argentina had a crisis, Argentines stayed and helped rebuild their country. If you ask me, it's an abrogation of the responsibilities of democratic citizenship for people to abandon ship when they can't keep themselves in the style to which they're accustomed. It's part of the selfish streak that ************************************ up our country so much in the first place.
****************************** Jersey Cityand Union City New Jersey is little Argentina due to Argentinians having to leave home. You are the typical moron who has ruined our country. I really hope you get what you are due. Keyboard coward.
 

mistercrabs

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****************************** Jersey Cityand Union City New Jersey is little Argentina due to Argentinians having to leave home. You are the typical moron who has ruined our country. I really hope you get what you are due. Keyboard coward.
Well anecdotal evidence and threats aside, in the five years after the Argentine economic collapse, 300,000 Argentines emigrated, out of a population of 40 million. Compare this to the expected 120,000 Irish next year, out of a population of 4 million. Do your homework.
 

vanadder

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fianna fail strategy

With the prospect of further mass emigration doesn't it serve the narrow interests of the Fianna Fail party, in terms of a general election, that these people will not be able to cast their vote. Or are you able to postal vote from abroad? and if so should the electoral commission be advertising the ways in which that's possible.
 

mistercrabs

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With the prospect of further mass emigration doesn't it serve the narrow interests of the Fianna Fail party, in terms of a general election, that these people will not be able to cast their vote. Or are you able to postal vote from abroad? and if so should the electoral commission be advertising the ways in which that's possible.
No you can't. You have to be resident in Ireland, or be working abroad in an embassy or the like.
 

Sham96

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Well anecdotal evidence and threats aside, in the five years after the Argentine economic collapse, 300,000 Argentines emigrated, out of a population of 40 million. Compare this to the expected 120,000 Irish next year, out of a population of 4 million. Do your homework.
What is your point? I can tell immediately you are not from a tough part of Ireland. You strike me as a Green traitor or FF Sliveen supporter from South Dublin (or some other rich part of Ireland) who is amazed that the entire world has sussed you out for what you really are. I am giving you good advice. Keep your head down.
 

muck_savage

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You can hide and assimilate in Boston easily.
Yes, you too could live like an escaped criminal in a foreign country. No bank account, no ATM card, no drivers licence, no way to leave the country for a holiday/family occasion/bereavement, forced to exist in the cash economy, no career, no mortgage prospects, always beholden unto the dishonesty of strangers for your income, always one simple accident involving the authorities from detention and expulsion.

No thanks.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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Well anecdotal evidence and threats aside, in the five years after the Argentine economic collapse, 300,000 Argentines emigrated, out of a population of 40 million. Compare this to the expected 120,000 Irish next year, out of a population of 4 million. Do your homework.
You can't blame people for going abroad to find work, if you can earn more, or perhaps even avoid drawing the dole, being unemployed in Ireland isn't going to aid the economy.

Most of our professionals that are emigrating paid plenty of tax at the 41% rate + PRSI etc. while they were working. They don't owe anything to someone such as yourself, and if they can find work elsewhere fair play to them.
 

Tea Party Patriot

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Yes, you too could live like an escaped criminal in a foreign country. No bank account, no ATM card, no drivers licence, no way to leave the country for a holiday/family occasion/bereavement, forced to exist in the cash economy, no career, no mortgage prospects, always beholden unto the dishonesty of strangers for your income, always one simple accident involving the authorities from detention and expulsion.

No thanks.
+1, if you want a career don't go to the US without a visa
 

mistercrabs

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What is your point? I can tell immediately you are not from a tough part of Ireland. You strike me as a Green traitor or FF Sliveen supporter from South Dublin (or some other rich part of Ireland) who is amazed that the entire world has sussed you out for what you really are. I am giving you good advice. Keep your head down.
My point is that it is a national trait of the Irish to abandon their country when the going gets tough. It's another aspect of the selfishness which means we still have crappy run-down city centres after 20 years of economic boom, and no substantial cultural life because of the complete absence of philanthropy - and consequently a fraction of the real quality of life of places like Spain or Denmark. Who would want to stay here on the dole when there's nothing to do but drink and watch TV?!

God forbid young engineering graduates should stay and try to set up a company like they'd do in America. No - the Irish don't do the hard slog of entrepreneurialism. We like cushy pre-prepared jobs from America and Japan, that will go as fast as they came when the going gets tough. So now let's all leave to work in silicon valley while Ireland sinks.

And in fact I'm from a working class family in a run-down part of Limerick, so go ************************ yourself.
 


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