Non-voters - how can the opposition get them out?

Congalltee

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In every election well in excess of 30% of people do not vote. It is not always the same people, but a large proportion simply do not vote. And never will.

They have a legal right not to vote notwithstanding their social duty to do so. Many many people will be so disillusioned with politics that former voters may be turned off. Fianna Fail is a sad reflection of its formeer self from Lemass's time. I do wonder whether if FG had won the last election - would we be better off. I doubt it. But a change of personnel has to be good for us. Doesn't it?

What can be done to motivate the non-voter to vote?
1. Education - teach the importance of it.
2. Guilt - think of those who do not have the right to do so.
Both are bull.

The only think which can motivate someone who has never voted to do so, if there that there is something in it for them or that their anger is such they feel the desire to spend that half hour or so to vote. The best way is perhap asking people not to vote FOR parties but to vote against one in particular by supporting all of the others.

In your view - how do we rock the vote?.
 


Newsy

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In some cases, to get the vote, people have to believe that their vote makes a difference. Many people don't believe that. They feel, what's the point.

Politicans AND potential canditates need to be active in the local areas. It isn't good enough to have their 'clinics'......they need to have 'town-hall' meetings, on a regular basis.......they need to GO TO THE PEOPLE, rather than taking it for granted that 50-60% will go out to vote.

The need to inspire and motivate with their ideas.....they need to have imagination, passion for what they are doing........and above all they need to KEEP THEIR WORD.
 

hiding behind a poster

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In every election well in excess of 30% of people do not vote.
That's not actually the case. The first point to remember is that even from the day the Electoral Register closes, a couple of weeks before polling, things change. Lots of people die, for a start. And not just in those two weeks - often removing someone from the electoral register is the last thing family members will be thinking about, after losing a loved one. So you'll find that invariably anyone who died within about 6 months (often longer than that) will still be on the register, and will thus lower the turnout. Then you've a whole load of other things - people go on holidays. People are sick - from serious injuries and illnesses keeping them in hospital, down to just being bedridden for the day and unable to go out. People find themselves working in another part of the country (or abroad) for a week, a couple of weeks, a month, or whatever. Students don't register where they're in college, and can't get home.

The reality is that if absolutely everyone who could vote, did, you'd still only have turnout of about 80%. Any higher, and parties would be suspecting there was wholesale fraud going on. So in that respect, to have, as we do, about 7 of every 8 people who are able to vote, actually voting, is pretty good going.
 

hiding behind a poster

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I don't vote because I have no one to vote for and I'm not unique. If you want to increase the range of vote you have to increase the range of vote options.
If you're that dissatisfied with all the options, then run for election yourself.
 

The Underdog

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I don't vote because I have no one to vote for and I'm not unique. If you want to increase the range of vote you have to increase the range of vote options.
There's no such thing as the perfect candidate or party.
If you don’t vote, you’re letting some other gobdaw decide for you.
Exercise your democratic right.
 

Congalltee

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If State funding of political parties was based on actual votes recieved rather than per centages, they may have more of an incentive to get the vote out.
 

The OD

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There's no such thing as the perfect candidate or party.
If you don’t vote, you’re letting some other gobdaw decide for you.
Exercise your democratic right.
I love that expression - exercise you democratic right? What, once every four to five years or when the fat sacks of sh1t in the Dail have a barney?

Ah yes, isnt democracy wonderful? Vote for someone based on lies and you have no comeback.

I choose not to vote anymore, I have embraced the Fianna Fail philosophy of looking out for No.1 and no one. You can all burn as far as I am concerned, this state is not my state and given half the chance, I'd sell the whole country down the river for far less than 30 pieces of silver. I'd probably do it for free.
 

Cormac O Conachur

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Statistically, casting your vote or not has no bearing on the outcome of an election. That is if an individual were to decide this course of action. Polls are so good nowadays that you can ask a 1000 people in a poll of their opinion and their result would give you as near as damn the same answer as if the whole country was to vote.
So if you decide not to vote, the vote that you would potentially have given to your candidate had you voted would probably been cancelled by another person, who like you has now also decided not to vote. The outcome of voting and not voting would probably be the same. The reality is that most people will vote but even if was just 30% of the electorate the result would be the same should 80% vote. Read a book called Freakonomics to get the academic support to this theory.

The only way to change the country is to participate in it and while voting gives that sense of contributing to democracy it is really only a token gesture.
Contributing positively is hounding the political class to get them to turn in your favour, or becoming one yourself. You can influence them to do what you want by promising them your vote, but don't cod yourself that once their policies are set that you will have any influence over the country and its politicians. Interact with the politicians is how to influence change.
 

Congalltee

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Statistically one vote can make no difference. Historically, however, at least one seat is decided by less than twenty votes every election.

What is also statisically vital is that middle class areas have high turnouts while working class areas have very low turnouts. This is something which needs to change. But how?

(the importance of this is that candidates will spend more time in the areas of high turnout, thus these areas exert a greater influence. In my constituency in the last general election. If you divided the voters in wards by number of people who vote and by the number who voted for the unmentionable party, then the difference was one voter in 3 would be a FF voter in the middle class part of the constituency but a canvassed would have to call to 11 doors before meeting a constituent who votes FF in the poorer part).
 

junius

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Maybe they've emigrated? This Government has forced so many people to have to seek work far from their homes where they are registered to vote that they probably physically can't vote because their vote is in Donegal and their work is in Cork! My student son, aged 20 has had to register for his vote recently because it appears that he was never on any register anywhere and has never yet voted in an election even though he has never lived anywhere else in his life and was born here. The way things are run in this country he'll probably find the election is on a Thursday or something and he will have lectures on Friday - he's not going to travel 300+ miles to vote is he? Government is a mess - people unregistered, people double registered, God knows who being entitled to vote, people turning up at polling stations to find they have no vote even though they did last time etc.... I don't understand why, with government department obviously so understaffed, that they cannot take in all the unemployed (who would probably work a lot better than their regular staff in many instances) to tackle the backlog. Pay them double what they get on the dole (so, the extra cost would be minimal to the government) and let them prove their worth and gain valuable experience at the same time. and, the most important thing - they would have NO AUTOMATIC RIGHTS. If they slacked, messed, did no work, they would not come again the next day. Might teach the permanent staff a valuable lesson too!
 
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Congalltee

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Why does your son not register where he goes to college ie where he lives? Go to the county council's website and he signs it in a Garda station anchor stamped. This can be done up to 15 days before polling day.

The other distortion is county people registered 'at home' rather than Dublin. Despite living in the capital for years.
 

TradCat

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If someone tells you they won't vote ask them who they would vote for if the ballot paper was in front of them and a gun was put to their head. If they say FF or Green change the subject. If they say anybody else tell them they have already made their choice but they are denying themselves a say.
 

ocoonassa

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That's not actually the case. The first point to remember is that even from the day the Electoral Register closes, a couple of weeks before polling, things change. Lots of people die, for a start. And not just in those two weeks - often removing someone from the electoral register is the last thing family members will be thinking about, after losing a loved one. So you'll find that invariably anyone who died within about 6 months (often longer than that) will still be on the register, and will thus lower the turnout. Then you've a whole load of other things - people go on holidays. People are sick - from serious injuries and illnesses keeping them in hospital, down to just being bedridden for the day and unable to go out. People find themselves working in another part of the country (or abroad) for a week, a couple of weeks, a month, or whatever. Students don't register where they're in college, and can't get home.
Nonsense, the registered electorate is around three million and less than two million show up to vote. You can't just disappear over a million people by pretending they were all on holiday, in hospital or at college. There are vast numbers of people not voting because we effectively have a one party system with no variety of choice between candidates and their policies.
 

ellie08

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If we had local t.v. channels, politicians can broadcast their message to their constituency. I always vote but to be honest, you have no idea what they believe in, what sort of person they are, and you end up voting for the party you think is the best (or will do the least amount of damage to your country - FF - grrrrr). Even the local newspapers don't report much on most of them apart from when a politician turns up at some event.
 

Insole

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Me thinks that the next polling day will be quite busy.
But, how about we spread the voting process over a week. There are many reasons why on a particular day everybody cannot get to a polling station.
The count could still be postponed till after the cutoff to retain the spectacle ;)
 

junius

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Why does your son not register where he goes to college ie where he lives? Go to the county council's website and he signs it in a Garda station anchor stamped. This can be done up to 15 days before polling day.

The other distortion is county people registered 'at home' rather than Dublin. Despite living in the capital for years.
Well, unless we knew what day an election would be held on that wouldn't be possible. If it was a weekend, he would be back home then. Anyway, it would be ridiculous for a student to register where they are in college. Students change addresses like they change their shirts sometimes. And, every year, they are rarely at the same address again. If people changed their vote to every temporary address they have in this day and age of uncertainty in Ireland, no wonder the Government is in such a mess as regards knowing who is who and where they are at any moment in time. Are you suggesting that people should never have any permanent address? Also, maybe country people would prefer to vote for candidates they know for their home area rather than for candidates they have no interest in nor the candidates interest in them or their predicament in a city in which they are forced to live temporarily for work purposes?
 

Congalltee

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Well, unless we knew what day an election would be held on that wouldn't be possible. If it was a weekend, he would be back home then. Anyway, it would be ridiculous for a student to register where they are in college. Students change addresses like they change their shirts sometimes. And, every year, they are rarely at the same address again. If people changed their vote to every temporary address they have in this day and age of uncertainty in Ireland, no wonder the Government is in such a mess as regards knowing who is who and where they are at any moment in time. Are you suggesting that people should never have any permanent address? Also, maybe country people would prefer to vote for candidates they know for their home area rather than for candidates they have no interest in nor the candidates interest in them or their predicament in a city in which they are forced to live temporarily for work purposes?
It is a national poll. Your son can register in both. As long as he only votes in one. As I said, you can register up to fifteen days before polling day.
 


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