"normalising" us Irish. Shameful or a sign of 'maturity', the obsequious engagement with our former masters?

Morgellons

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The release of the 'Guilford Four' and 'Birmingham Six' had a profound affect on many English and this would explain some of it. I was in London in 1992 when the Provoes were blitzing the place and the only anti IRA conversation i had was with a Kiwi girl and a white South African lass who hated the kaffirs. An American journo in our shared accomdation shocked them by saying the Brits had it coming for what they'd did in Ireland.
Same period the explosive popularity of the London Irish rebel Shane McGowan across the young spectrum of English all tied in with this. It was probably all too much for most of the RoI population after decades of anti-nationalist section-31 indoctrination.
Yes, this was time the Ira blew up canary wharf-it was a massive explosion and could be seen from everywhere in London. The odd thing is that most of my English friends were actually impressed by the power of it.
 


pumpkinpie

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I'm curious to see how many of the English who have recently obtained Irish passports will come and live here if it all goes tits up when Britain leaves, if it ever happens. Does having an Irish passport entitle someone who has never lived here to move here and receive Social Welfare benefits and pensions etc or Social housing? What about the potential influx to Ireland of EU citizens living in Britain who want to stay in Europe but not return to their home countries? This could end up being disastrous for us.
 

Strawberry

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I'm curious to see how many of the English who have recently obtained Irish passports will come and live here if it all goes tits up when Britain leaves, if it ever happens. Does having an Irish passport entitle someone who has never lived here to move here and receive Social Welfare benefits and pensions etc or Social housing? What about the potential influx to Ireland of EU citizens living in Britain who want to stay in Europe but not return to their home countries? This could end up being disastrous for us.
That would be brilliant for us! And no, an Irish passport doesn't entitle anyone to claim instant social welfare and social housing, there are other hoops to jump through before that, including working and paying stamps for, iirc, two years.
 

hollandia

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That would be brilliant for us! And no, an Irish passport doesn't entitle anyone to claim instant social welfare and social housing, there are other hoops to jump through before that, including working and paying stamps for, iirc, two years.
If you are a UK citizen, there is a reciprocal arrangement whereby your benefits can be transferred. So if you've worked long enough in the UK, you are entitled to some benefits.
 

pumpkinpie

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That would be brilliant for us! And no, an Irish passport doesn't entitle anyone to claim instant social welfare and social housing, there are other hoops to jump through before that, including working and paying stamps for, iirc, two years.
It wouldn't be brilliant for us. We don't have enough housing so an influx of people wanting to buy or rent property would make things even more expensive. We don't have enough school places and our health service is already overstretched.
 

Strawberry

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It wouldn't be brilliant for us. We don't have enough housing so an influx of people wanting to buy or rent property would make things even more expensive. We don't have enough school places and our health service is already overstretched.
It would be absolutely brilliant for us to have an influx of descendants of the diaspora coming home to live and work, and bringing their skills with them. Those skills, of course, will include teachers, nurses, doctors, construction workers - ie, the kind of people needed to build houses, and run a decent health and education system.
 

cricket

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Yes, this was time the Ira blew up canary wharf-it was a massive explosion and could be seen from everywhere in London. The odd thing is that most of my English friends were actually impressed by the power of it.
:rolleyes:

They must have been thrilled to experience a kind of Irish Guy Fawkes ?
 

pumpkinpie

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It would be absolutely brilliant for us to have an influx of descendants of the diaspora coming home to live and work, and bringing their skills with them. Those skills, of course, will include teachers, nurses, doctors, construction workers - ie, the kind of people needed to build houses, and run a decent health and education system.
Where will they live until they build the houses? What schools will their children attend until extra places are found? Irish people returning don't meet the Habitual Residence rule so they have to wait until they've been here for 1 year before they qualify. Whereas someone granted asylum after getting in illegally is entitled to free everything. What you're describing is a lot like saying ''oh look that sofa is amazing and it's on sale it'll do wonders for my living room'', but when you get it home it doesn't fit in the door, it's too big for the living room, there's nowhere to put it and the shop won't take it back.
 

Travis Bickle

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If you want to build an empire you must demean and dehumanise the conquered subjects. There is nothing casual about this kind of racism.
We just have to look at how the English portray the Indians, Welsh, Scots, Irish etc. When I see the Royals it's akin to having Hitlers decedents on the cover of Hello. Shameful. The Brits are/were the best at PR and spin.
 

Strawberry

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Where will they live until they build the houses? What schools will their children attend until extra places are found? Irish people returning don't meet the Habitual Residence rule so they have to wait until they've been here for 1 year before they qualify. Whereas someone granted asylum after getting in illegally is entitled to free everything. What you're describing is a lot like saying ''oh look that sofa is amazing and it's on sale it'll do wonders for my living room'', but when you get it home it doesn't fit in the door, it's too big for the living room, there's nowhere to put it and the shop won't take it back.
No, it isn't. That analogy would only work if the sofa contained the innate ability to make the living room grow to fit it.

You need to be more ambitious and stop thinking Ireland can't cope with more people.
 

McTell

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Well in 2009 when the Creditors/Troika/EU superpowers were assessing the likely response of pressurising Dublin into nationalising the private bank debt, what likely conclusion did they surmise/characterise from the reaction of the Republic of Ireland to other travails it'd been confronted with?

Many of you fail to see the connection because you've mentally done a 'pontius pilot' regarding the way the reactionary imperilaist elements of London and their Orange colonial supremacists, //
(yawnnnn)
.

That's exactly my point.

The post-colonial gaelic misty-mountain fake-newgrange diddly-eye 1916-was-great brits-out brigade were/are exactly the sort of people who know nothing about money and everything about useless flags, armies and begrudgery.

Of course the troika came, saw and left the bill. Wouldn't you?

POlitical parties comprising children-of-TDs, or sports heros, or reformed "activists", are not the sort of people to run the country in the 2000s. Perfect for the 17- or 1800s, but it's not the 1800s, it's 2017.

My focus is on us getting copped-on, and I don't give a toss what anyone else thinks about us. Never mind some scribbler in a third rate english uni.
 

pumpkinpie

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That's exactly my point.

The post-colonial gaelic misty-mountain fake-newgrange diddly-eye 1916-was-great brits-out brigade were/are exactly the sort of people who know nothing about money and everything about useless flags, armies and begrudgery.

Of course the troika came, saw and left the bill. Wouldn't you?

POlitical parties comprising children-of-TDs, or sports heros, or reformed "activists", are not the sort of people to run the country in the 2000s. Perfect for the 17- or 1800s, but it's not the 1800s, it's 2017.

My focus is on us getting copped-on, and I don't give a toss what anyone else thinks about us. Never mind some scribbler in a third rate english uni.
Yep, and then they complain that tourism from Britain is down this year.
 

pumpkinpie

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No, it isn't. That analogy would only work if the sofa contained the innate ability to make the living room grow to fit it.

You need to be more ambitious and stop thinking Ireland can't cope with more people.
I am ambitious, I'm also realistic.
 

McTell

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No
Yep, and then they complain that tourism from Britain is down this year.

Seemples, they can't afford us

(Hmm, we can't afford us either...)
 

pumpkinpie

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Seemples, they can't afford us

(Hmm, we can't afford us either...)
It's not stopping other tourists visiting or British tourists from going on holiday in other European destinations. I agree that Ireland is too expensive though. I was thinking of going to a gig in November in Dublin and staying overnight but I could have had a mini break in Europe for what it would have cost me.
 

cricket

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It's not stopping other tourists visiting or British tourists from going on holiday in other European destinations. I agree that Ireland is too expensive though. I was thinking of going to a gig in November in Dublin and staying overnight but I could have had a mini break in Europe for what it would have cost me.
Hotel rates in Dublin are scandalous, better off staying within a short bus/train journey of city.
 

pumpkinpie

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Hotel rates in Dublin are scandalous, better off staying within a short bus/train journey of city.
It works out cheaper to see it in Killarney in January than in Dublin in November so we're going to do that instead.
 

Watcher2

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The truth of 800 years of oppression.
I wasn't wishing any of it away. I actually acknowledged it but you, nor anyone else here were even around during those 800 years, so the oppression you speak of has nothing to do with you. Pretending it does is a sick joke.
 

Connollyist a/c no.2

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from wikipedia

"Many Irish people living in Coventry after the bombing found that the city's attitude had turned against them even though most of them had no IRA sympathies.[1] Some Irish were told to find new lodgings, whilst strike action was threatened in factories unless they withdrew all 2,000 Irish labourers.[1][2] An anti-IRA protest march was staged in Baginton by thousands of workers of Armstrong Whitworth.[2] The chief constable of Coventry, Captain Hector, had to issue a denial saying that he was "perfectly good Sommerset man" and not Irish.[1][2]"
 


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