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Now THIS is scary, DNA + 3D printing = your caught !


Pat Gill

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If you are one of the tiny percentage of people who have never done anything (morally or legally) wrong, then there is nothing to see here, please walk on, but for normal humans, especially the lipstick on the collar merchants, then........

It started with hair. Donning a pair of rubber gloves, Heather Dewey-Hagborg collected hairs from a public bathroom at Penn Station and placed them in plastic baggies for safe keeping. Then, her search expanded to include other types of forensic evidence. As the artist traverses her usual routes through New York City from her home in Brooklyn, down sidewalks onto city buses and subway cars—even into art museums—she gathers fingernails, cigarette butts and wads of discarded chewing gum.
Dewey-Hagborg’s odd habit has a larger purpose. The 30-year-old PhD student, studying electronic arts at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, extracts DNA from each piece of evidence she collects and enters this data into a computer program, which churns out a model of the face of the person who left the hair, fingernail, cigarette or gum behind.


It gets creepier.


From those facial models, she then produces actual sculptures using a 3D printer. When she shows the series, called “Stranger Visions,” she hangs the life-sized portraits, like life masks, on gallery walls. Oftentimes, beside a portrait, is a Victorian-style wooden box with various compartments holding the original sample, data about it and a photograph of where it was found.


Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg and her DNA-derived self-portrait. Photo by Dan Phiffer.

If an artist can now afford this technology then soon everyone else can, I wonder will the streets stay any cleaner or marriages be any safer :p or will boys and girls continue to be boys and girls and just carry a pocket vacuum cleaner :lol:




 

Sync

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Pat Gill

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ruserious

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The rate technology is advancing, it is completely impossible to imagine the world by 2100, not a mind the year 3000.
 

Fir Bolg

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Has she actually reproduced an image which is identical or similar to the owner of the original DNA?? Methinks not.
 

Ribeye

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Sorry, I'm no science professor or anything,

But you can't produce a physical likeness from a DNA sample,

Even with a 3-D printer,
 
S

simeongrimes

For a spouse to look for evidence they would first have to become suspicious and if they are suspicious you are usually going to be caught anyway.
 

ManInTheArena

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Every week there is some new "somebody creates something" scare in regard to 3D printers. Funny how you never actually hear anything about the guys who must now have fully equipped armies with all the guns they've printed, or all the billionaires who are printing out complex machines.......

Methinks the 3D printing industry puts a lot of this stuff out itself - no news is bad news.
 

aldiper

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Hmm, while predicting someone's appearance from their DNA is certainly an interesting proposition, I'd like to see the output of this mysterious computer program for known DNA samples before I consider this anything more than a gimmick to sell artwork...
 

NewGoldDream

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I always take my hairs with me when I leave public bathrooms. I'd hate for people to know I pee.
 
D

Deleted member 17573

There is only very limited knowledge today of the genes that determine facial features. No doubt it will become possible someday but this person is not producing accurate facial images from a DNA sample.
 

Ribeye

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Unemployment will go up when all those wax work makers replaced by printers:)
 

aldiper

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Sorry, I'm no science professor or anything,

But you can't produce a physical likeness from a DNA sample,

Even with a 3-D printer,
Indeed Ribeye - the idea of predicting someone's appearance from their DNA is outlandish to say the least. Contrary to popular opinion, DNA is not like a computer program, where given inputs generate set outputs in a predictable manner (stochastic programs excepted, of course). It's a similar situation to the way in which you may inherit genes that predispose to to certain illnesses, but do not mean you will develop that disease, e.g. apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer's Disease
 

Bonsai Experiment

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There is only very limited knowledge today of the genes that determine facial features. No doubt it will become possible someday but this person is not producing accurate facial images from a DNA sample.
Ye its absolute poppy ****. I'd like to see her reproduce a lifelike image of a person from a piece of Chewing gum and then compare it to the person and see how life like it actually is. This just sounds like utter pap, for people who watch way too much star trek.
 

Ribeye

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"have we got an image of the suspect yet"

"yes sir, we're just waiting for the printer to figure out if he had a beard and what his haircut was like"

What a scam:)
 

Pat Gill

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"have we got an image of the suspect yet"

"yes sir, we're just waiting for the printer to figure out if he had a beard and what his haircut was like"

What a scam:)
Ribeye, its a bank holiday, surely even the scammers of the world take the occasional break :D
 

Dublin 4

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We're getting into a really interesting time period for the criminal system, DNA isn't quite the panacea it was for the last 20 years or so.

News Blog: Lab creates fake DNA evidence
Fake DNA aint a Panacea for offenders either :p

But, don't worry, like a hacker taking down servers to sell cyber security services, Nucleix has a fix: a system that can detect the difference between natural and manufactured DNA. It looks for a lack of methylation; an addition of methyl groups to DNA occurs naturally in genetic code, but it isn't found in Nucleix's manipulated DNA.
 

Pat Gill

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There is only very limited knowledge today of the genes that determine facial features. No doubt it will become possible someday but this person is not producing accurate facial images from a DNA sample.
Sailor,
From the article in the OP.

From this sequence, Dewey-Hagborg gathers information about the person’s ancestry, gender, eye color, propensity to be overweight and other traits related to facial morphology, such as the space between one’s eyes. “I have a list of about 40 or 50 different traits that I have either successfully analyzed or I am in the process of working on right now,” she says.

There is, of course, no way of knowing how accurate Dewey-Hagborg’s sculptures are—since the samples are from anonymous individuals, a direct comparison cannot be made. Certainly, there are limitations to what is known about how genes are linked to specific facial features.”We are really just starting to learn about that information,” says Dewey-Hagborg. The artist has no way, for instance, to tell the age of a person based on their DNA. “For right now, the process creates basically a 25-year-old version of the person,” she says.
So anyone older than 25 can still sin to their hearts content, for another year or two anyway.
 
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