Nuances of a re-united Ireland

Spirit Of Newgrange

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the orangemen of the six counties will want to join ireland sometime after mainland britain falls to muslim & immigrant ethnic insurgents.
 
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R

Ringsend Charlie

the orangemen of the six counties will want to join ireland sometime after mainland britain falls to muslim & immigrant ethnic insurgents.
Britain has, fair play to them, constructed a massively problematic society, but this time they have done it at home. One for the road as such. During the build up to the Iraq war, many in Labour were fearful of Muslim areas feeling that they were at war with the state that was at war with the ummah.

The radicalization of Britain's Muslim yoof continues apace, as does the balkanization of towns thanks to England's obsession over the last 20 years with Multi-Culturalism.

It is certainly going to be interesting.

However given the continuing mass migration of young Unionists to England, the North will be reintegrated long before England goes that far.
 
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likesfish

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million plus muslims in a population of 60 plus million not really a problem considering more people claimed they were "JEDI" than muslim
 

SideysGhost

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Well it says that was the Unionist argument in fairness, not that there was any truth in it. And lower educational standards, really? Catholic schools out preform state ones these days as far as I know. I assumed this had always been the case.
Not "always" no...the Butler Act after WWII extended free secondary education across the UK and provided the original grant mechanisms to allow poor people to attend university. It was bitterly resisted by Old Stormont but Westminster eventually forced it through onto Norn Irn in the late 1940s.

The growth in the Catholic secondary and grammar system dates from then - before then education was only for the tiny rich Catholic elite. My fathers generation, most of them would have left school at around 11-13 years old. But people just a few years younger than him for the first time could go all the way through secondary school and then on to university.

It was that generation, the first generation of Norn Irn Caflicks to get an education, that provided John Hume, Bernadette Devlin, Eamonn McCann and all the rest. It was that generation of educated Catholics all pouring out of schools and university seeking proper employment from the mid 60s onwards and not willing to accept second-class menial jobs any more, that made the Protestant working class so paranoid and ripe for exploitation by the likes of Paisley - and at a time when the economic mismanagement of Old Stormont had run down the industrial base over decades and made all the industrial jobs that had traditionally been earmarked for "Loyal Protestants" ever-scarcer anyway.

Education and the Butler Act, and the inevitable impact it had 20 years later on the segregated employment market, is what really led to Paisleyism, NICRA, and eventually the Troubles.
 

THR

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Can I ask a question about Ireland? Well, I'll ask it nevertheless.

Is it possible that a person is an Irish language activist trying to revive the language, a person enjoys gaelic sports much more than football and rugby and all other things associated with Irishness but that person lives in Northern-Ireland and vehemently supports that Northern-Ireland remains part of the UK?

Are there any persons like that at all or would such persons be considered schizophrenic?
 

ruserious

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Can I ask a question about Ireland? Well, I'll ask it nevertheless.

Is it possible that a person is an Irish language activist trying to revive the language, a person enjoys gaelic sports much more than football and rugby and all other things associated with Irishness but that person lives in Northern-Ireland and vehemently supports that Northern-Ireland remains part of the UK?

Are there any persons like that at all or would such persons be considered schizophrenic?
Maybe in the current economic crisis and you'll always have the one but in general, no.
 
J

Johnny Boy

I am surprised that you asked this question. Given that they are Nationalist parties, I would presume that they would vote for a re-united Ireland..
I have lived in Northern Ireland for almost 40 years, having grown up in the Republic. That presumption is wrong. I know Sinn Fein voters who would not vote for a united Ireland. As many as 35% of SDLP/Sinn Fein voters would not favour a united Ireland. Opinion polls over many years confirm this.
 

murf13

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I'm on the mainland - though the Copelands are wonderful :)

Do you think that your invective (on this site) or that of others from either side of the political divide in any way contributed to yesterdays murder?
 

factual

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I have lived in Northern Ireland for almost 40 years, having grown up in the Republic. That presumption is wrong. I know Sinn Fein voters who would not vote for a united Ireland. As many as 35% of SDLP/Sinn Fein voters would not favour a united Ireland. Opinion polls over many years confirm this.
Do you not think, though, that if Enda Kenny were to campaign in the six counties, making persuasive speeches on the basis that "we are one people" and outlining the economic arguments, that could sway a lot of wavering middle ground voters in the referendum?
 

factual

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Can I ask a question about Ireland? Well, I'll ask it nevertheless.

Is it possible that a person is an Irish language activist trying to revive the language, a person enjoys gaelic sports much more than football and rugby and all other things associated with Irishness but that person lives in Northern-Ireland and vehemently supports that Northern-Ireland remains part of the UK?

Are there any persons like that at all or would such persons be considered schizophrenic?
There is I believe a tradition of Presbyterians taking an interest in the Irish language, while remaining for the union, I think this dates before partition though.
 

factual

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Factual, when are you going to get it into your head - we are broke!! We can't afford to run or own State, much less take on another one as well..:roll: Grow up & stop living in your fantasy la la land.
There are significant economies of scale from us in Dublin running the six counties.
 

THR

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There is I believe a tradition of Presbyterians taking an interest in the Irish language, while remaining for the union, I think this dates before partition though.
Btw, is there any gaelic sports or Irish language activity in Northern-Ireland? Somehow I have a hunch this might be a very inane question to ask but at the risk of making myself a laughing stock I'll ask it nevertheless because I really don't know.
 

factual

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Btw, is there any gaelic sports or Irish language activity in Northern-Ireland? Somehow I have a hunch this might be a very inane question to ask but at the risk of making myself a laughing stock I'll ask it nevertheless because I really don't know.
Oh yes - very much so. Although at the moment the take-up and interest is higher among the Catholic community up there.
 


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