Number of visits by ERII to Germany 4, Ireland 0



TommyO'Brien

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Well she is 3/4's German after all - I am not aware of any Irish blood ;)

The last time she was in Berlin, about 6 years ago, she was parading down Unter Den Linden when a load of builders unfurled a huge banner which read.

WELCOME HOME, QE2 ;)

I thought that was funny
Actually, going by her parents, she is half-English, half-Scottish.

By her grandparents she is half-Scottish, quarter English and quarter German.
 

Mr Crowley

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She should be invited to take the family for a boat trip round Mullaghmore.
 

TommyO'Brien

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Just came a cross a report that Elizabeth II has visited Germany 4 times during her reign. Imagine that. How many times has she visited Ireland? 0 times. Not that I particularly care whether she does or not but really given the rivalries that have existed between the UK and Germany the contrast is pretty clear.

The question is does the British establishment actually recognise this state?
State visits occur when someone is invited by the head of state of the country being visited.

Queen Elizabeth II has received no invites by Irish presidents. Nor have Irish presidents received invites by British monarchs.

In both cases however the heads of state issue invitations on the advice of the governments. Their hands are tied on the issue. Whether an invite is issued and is accepted is decided in Whitehall and Merrion Street, not Buckingham Palace and Áras an Uachtaráin.

In the 1970s there were plans afoot to issue respective invitations. The Queen, on the advice of the Labour government, would invite President Hillery. He would pay a state visit, and then in reciprocation would issue an invitation to the Queen, who would visit the following year. But the assassination of Mountbatten, who had been secretly lobbying behind the scenes for Irish unity (he had been a friend of de Valera in the 1950s and 1960s) led the plan for reciprocal visits to be put on hold.

The Queen did, off her own bat, invite President Robinson, who was due to pay a private visit to London, to pay a courtesy call on the Palace, an invitation which forced the hands of both governments.

In the mid 1990s reciprocal official visits occurred. (Official visits are not head of state to head of state, but are invitations by a government to a head of state to visit it.) John Major's government invited President Robinson to visit London. The Irish government then invited the Prince of Wales to visit Dublin. (In monarchies, official visits are usually carried out by their heir to the throne, not the monarch.)

Reciprocal visits by the respective heads of state are likely to happen quite soon, probably in 2010. The years 2011 and 2012 are unlikely to be used because the Queen has a longstanding tradition of not visiting states during election years and 2011 is the scheduled date for the next Irish presidential election, and 2012 the scheduled date for the Irish general election (though I suspect we will have a general election well before then, probably early 2010).

Two issues suggest it the reciprocal visits will be soon.
1. Mary McAleese and the Queen are long-standing personal friends, dating back to their meeting when McAleese as Pro-vice-chancellor of QUB was invited to a dinner to the Palace to discuss with the Queen her experiences as a Northern nationalist, and in particular her experiences at the hands of loyalists. The two women instantly hit it off, in part discovering a shared interest in Seamus Heaney poetry (the Queen joked, when presented with a collection of Heaney's works by McAleese, referring to then President Robinson's love of quoting Heaney in speeches, "now I can out-Heaney Mary Robinson!"). So it is likely that the Queen would like to host a state visit to London by Mary McAleese while she is still president. (While the decision is for government, heads of state do let it be known who they would like to be given permission to invite.)

2. The Queen and Prince Philip are getting on in years. Philip in particular is not in his full health, but seriously wants to pay a state visit to Ireland. So the governments will want to arrange reciprocal state visits while both are up to it. The Queen's health is very strong, but then considering that her mother, aged 100, was still carrying out official engagements and famously exhausted a Guardian journalist 60 years younger than her when he accompanied her to her day's engagements when she was in her late 90s, Elizabeth II is likely to be going strong for many years to come. Philip however is older and less well, though pretty well for an 88 year old!

So the odds are that the reciprocal state visits will occur before President McAleese's end of her term in 2011 and Philip's 90th birthday, which will be in June 2011.
 
M

MrFunkyBoogaloo

Just came a cross a report that Elizabeth II has visited Germany 4 times during her reign. Imagine that. How many times has she visited Ireland? 0 times. Not that I particularly care whether she does or not but really given the rivalries that have existed between the UK and Germany the contrast is pretty clear.

The question is does the British establishment actually recognise this state?
Who cares really.. She's only an old bag who sits on a stolen heirloom from Scotland (allegedly?!?;))

And of course the 'British Establishment' recognises this state. Their establishment is the Government, she's only the face of their currency.
 

Magror14

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State visits occur when someone is invited by the head of state of the country being visited.

Queen Elizabeth II has received no invites by Irish presidents. Nor have Irish presidents received invites by British monarchs.

In both cases however the heads of state issue invitations on the advice of the governments. Their hands are tied on the issue. Whether an invite is issued and is accepted is decided in Whitehall and Merrion Street, not Buckingham Palace and Áras an Uachtaráin.

In the 1970s there were plans afoot to issue respective invitations. The Queen, on the advice of the Labour government, would invite President Hillery. He would pay a state visit, and then in reciprocation would issue an invitation to the Queen, who would visit the following year. But the assassination of Mountbatten, who had been secretly lobbying behind the scenes for Irish unity (he had been a friend of de Valera in the 1950s and 1960s) led the plan for reciprocal visits to be put on hold.

The Queen did, off her own bat, invite President Robinson, who was due to pay a private visit to London, to pay a courtesy call on the Palace, an invitation which forced the hands of both governments.

In the mid 1990s reciprocal official visits occurred. (Official visits are not head of state to head of state, but are invitations by a government to a head of state to visit it.) John Major's government invited President Robinson to visit London. The Irish government then invited the Prince of Wales to visit Dublin. (In monarchies, official visits are usually carried out by their heir to the throne, not the monarch.)

Reciprocal visits by the respective heads of state are likely to happen quite soon, probably in 2010. The years 2011 and 2012 are unlikely to be used because the Queen has a longstanding tradition of not visiting states during election years and 2011 is the scheduled date for the next Irish presidential election, and 2012 the scheduled date for the Irish general election (though I suspect we will have a general election well before then, probably early 2010).

Two issues suggest it the reciprocal visits will be soon.
1. Mary McAleese and the Queen are long-standing personal friends, dating back to their meeting when McAleese as Pro-vice-chancellor of QUB was invited to a dinner to the Palace to discuss with the Queen her experiences as a Northern nationalist, and in particular her experiences at the hands of loyalists. The two women instantly hit it off, in part discovering a shared interest in Seamus Heaney poetry (the Queen joked, when presented with a collection of Heaney's works by McAleese, referring to then President Robinson's love of quoting Heaney in speeches, "now I can out-Heaney Mary Robinson!"). So it is likely that the Queen would like to host a state visit to London by Mary McAleese while she is still president. (While the decision is for government, heads of state do let it be known who they would like to be given permission to invite.)

2. The Queen and Prince Philip are getting on in years. Philip in particular is not in his full health, but seriously wants to pay a state visit to Ireland. So the governments will want to arrange reciprocal state visits while both are up to it. The Queen's health is very strong, but then considering that her mother, aged 100, was still carrying out official engagements and famously exhausted a Guardian journalist 60 years younger than her when he accompanied her to her day's engagements when she was in her late 90s, Elizabeth II is likely to be going strong for many years to come. Philip however is older and less well, though pretty well for an 88 year old!

So the odds are that the reciprocal state visits will occur before President McAleese's end of her term in 2011 and Philip's 90th birthday, which will be in June 2011.
Have to say, Tommy, that was one of the best responses I have received to a post and thanks for enlightening me. I have only just seen it now. It makes Pie a worthwhile place to spend time.

And as for the signature. Hear hear!
 

merle haggard

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Just came a cross a report that Elizabeth II has visited Germany 4 times during her reign. Imagine that. How many times has she visited Ireland? 0 times. Not that I particularly care whether she does or not but really given the rivalries that have existed between the UK and Germany the contrast is pretty clear.

The question is does the British establishment actually recognise this state?

she has visited ireland on a number of occasions , and even claims to own part of it .
In the past she has refused to visit the jurisdiction of southern Ireland on the basis of its constitutional claim to actually own Ireland and not just the bit mrs windsor lets them run . However since that state no longer claims sovereignty over Ireland and just part of it and recognises her as the rightful owner of the rest of Ireland she may well deign to visit those whove accepted she is actually the rightful ruler afterall . She may well reward with her gracious presence those whove finally submitted to her demands that the Irish people dont have any right to question her ownership of any part of their own country.
 

Magror14

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Messages
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she has visited ireland on a number of occasions , and even claims to own part of it .
In the past she has refused to visit the jurisdiction of southern Ireland on the basis of its constitutional claim to actually own Ireland and not just the bit mrs windsor lets them run . However since that state no longer claims sovereignty over Ireland and just part of it and recognises her as the rightful owner of the rest of Ireland she may well deign to visit those whove accepted she is actually the rightful ruler afterall . She may well reward with her gracious presence those whove finally submitted to her demands that the Irish people dont have any right to question her ownership of any part of their own country.
Voted for the Good Friday Agreement but I did not like giving up the Article 3 claim. Hopefully history will show that we made the right decision. At least for the moment people are not getting blown to bits in the streets and a generation is growing up in a relatively non-violent environment.

Southern armchair republicans were very strong on Article 3.
 

Magror14

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Joined
Jun 13, 2008
Messages
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State visits occur when someone is invited by the head of state of the country being visited.

Queen Elizabeth II has received no invites by Irish presidents. Nor have Irish presidents received invites by British monarchs.

In both cases however the heads of state issue invitations on the advice of the governments. Their hands are tied on the issue. Whether an invite is issued and is accepted is decided in Whitehall and Merrion Street, not Buckingham Palace and Áras an Uachtaráin.

In the 1970s there were plans afoot to issue respective invitations. The Queen, on the advice of the Labour government, would invite President Hillery. He would pay a state visit, and then in reciprocation would issue an invitation to the Queen, who would visit the following year. But the assassination of Mountbatten, who had been secretly lobbying behind the scenes for Irish unity (he had been a friend of de Valera in the 1950s and 1960s) led the plan for reciprocal visits to be put on hold.

The Queen did, off her own bat, invite President Robinson, who was due to pay a private visit to London, to pay a courtesy call on the Palace, an invitation which forced the hands of both governments.

In the mid 1990s reciprocal official visits occurred. (Official visits are not head of state to head of state, but are invitations by a government to a head of state to visit it.) John Major's government invited President Robinson to visit London. The Irish government then invited the Prince of Wales to visit Dublin. (In monarchies, official visits are usually carried out by their heir to the throne, not the monarch.)

Reciprocal visits by the respective heads of state are likely to happen quite soon, probably in 2010. The years 2011 and 2012 are unlikely to be used because the Queen has a longstanding tradition of not visiting states during election years and 2011 is the scheduled date for the next Irish presidential election, and 2012 the scheduled date for the Irish general election (though I suspect we will have a general election well before then, probably early 2010).

Two issues suggest it the reciprocal visits will be soon.
1. Mary McAleese and the Queen are long-standing personal friends, dating back to their meeting when McAleese as Pro-vice-chancellor of QUB was invited to a dinner to the Palace to discuss with the Queen her experiences as a Northern nationalist, and in particular her experiences at the hands of loyalists. The two women instantly hit it off, in part discovering a shared interest in Seamus Heaney poetry (the Queen joked, when presented with a collection of Heaney's works by McAleese, referring to then President Robinson's love of quoting Heaney in speeches, "now I can out-Heaney Mary Robinson!"). So it is likely that the Queen would like to host a state visit to London by Mary McAleese while she is still president. (While the decision is for government, heads of state do let it be known who they would like to be given permission to invite.)

2. The Queen and Prince Philip are getting on in years. Philip in particular is not in his full health, but seriously wants to pay a state visit to Ireland. So the governments will want to arrange reciprocal state visits while both are up to it. The Queen's health is very strong, but then considering that her mother, aged 100, was still carrying out official engagements and famously exhausted a Guardian journalist 60 years younger than her when he accompanied her to her day's engagements when she was in her late 90s, Elizabeth II is likely to be going strong for many years to come. Philip however is older and less well, though pretty well for an 88 year old!

So the odds are that the reciprocal state visits will occur before President McAleese's end of her term in 2011 and Philip's 90th birthday, which will be in June 2011.
Was just going back over some threads and came across this one and particularly this post. Looks like you called that one almost perfectly, Tommy. Not bad!
 

sinsin

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Joined
Nov 21, 2010
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Just came a cross a report that Elizabeth II has visited Germany 4 times during her reign. Imagine that. How many times has she visited Ireland? 0 times. Not that I particularly care whether she does or not but really given the rivalries that have existed between the UK and Germany the contrast is pretty clear.

The question is does the British establishment actually recognise this state?
Probably something to do with uncle Dickie.;)
 


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