Oaths of allegiance to the Crown are fairly common in British public life

McSlaggart

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"Oaths of allegiance to the Crown are fairly common in British public life and are similar to those in other countries where a declaration of loyalty is made to the state."

Swearing in and the parliamentary oath - UK Parliament


I for one think their is a big difference to swearing an oath to a state than a particular family. Is it not time that the UK changes this requirement for its elected representatives?
 


theloner

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[video]https://youtu.be/M_3l6tTCYp0[/video]
 

theloner

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Richard Burgon made a stand a while back when taking the oath:

“As someone who believes that the head of state should be elected, I make this oath in order to serve my constituents".

No big song or dance but ironically more than the stoops. Tony Banks famously crossed his fingers while reading out the words while DS said:

"I solemnly swear that I will bear true and faithful allegiance to the Queen when she pays her income tax." While another time he mumbled his way through the oath :)

Don't the SNP say it in Gaelic?
 
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Se0samh

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"Oaths of allegiance to the Crown are fairly common in British public life and are similar to those in other countries where a declaration of loyalty is made to the state."

Swearing in and the parliamentary oath - UK Parliament


I for one think their is a big difference to swearing an oath to a state than a particular family. Is it not time that the UK changes this requirement for its elected representatives?

A particular family who meets particular requirements, one of the foremost of which, is that they be of a particular religious sect...
 

former wesleyan

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A particular family who meets particular requirements, one of the foremost of which, is that they be of a particular religious sect...
That's usually the case. Not peculiar to Britain. Same rule applies to Denmark, Holland, Sweden etc.
 

McSlaggart

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That's usually the case. Not peculiar to Britain. Same rule applies to Denmark, Holland, Sweden etc.
Are you sure? I think the Swedish one is no longer used and I do not know about the others.

No matter in the UK it knows that a "section of the population" are Repbulican.
 

RasherHash

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"Oaths of allegiance to the Crown are fairly common in British public life and are similar to those in other countries where a declaration of loyalty is made to the state."

Swearing in and the parliamentary oath - UK Parliament


I for one think their is a big difference to swearing an oath to a state than a particular family. Is it not time that the UK changes this requirement for its elected representatives?
Yes and there's a lot of support in the UK for this but not enough thus far.
 

McSlaggart

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I'm not sure that still applies in the Netherlands, Wes.
Since the UK government signed the GFA it accepted that people in Northern Ireland can be Irish citizens. So Irish citizens are forced to swear an oath in the UK to a foreign head of state.
 

McSlaggart

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Yes and there's a lot of support in the UK for this but not enough thus far.
This is an issue arising out of the UK signing the GFA. It is a debatable point should you be made swear an oath to your President. It is totally unacceptable to be forced to swear an oath to a foreign head of state.
 

hollandia

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Since the UK government signed the GFA it accepted that people in Northern Ireland can be Irish citizens. So Irish citizens are forced to swear an oath in the UK to a foreign head of state.
ETA: since 1992 the monarch is invested by a joint session of both houses of the dutch parliament - so it has become a secular thing, with some nods toward religion. As I understand it the current Queen Consort is a Catholic.
 

hollandia

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TBH: I really don't care that the UK head of State has to be a Protestant. I've more of an issue with it being hereditary. Where the religious thing is problematic is in the theory of "conditional loyalty". This current Queen has maintained very good relations with the RCC, including having mass said privately by Cardinal Murphy-O'Connor at Sandringham. Oh yes, and she's met the Popes* on several occasions.

*nod to TFM
 

former wesleyan

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Are you sure? I think the Swedish one is no longer used and I do not know about the others.

No matter in the UK it knows that a "section of the population" are Repbulican.
The oath to the monarchy is gone in Sweden and Denmark since 1975 but the requirement for the monarch to be a member of the " reformed faith " still stands I think.
 

hollandia

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The oath to the monarchy is gone in Sweden and Denmark since 1975 but the requirement for the monarch to be a member of the " reformed faith " still stands I think.
The Swedish monarch must be a Lutheran. I can't see any such rule for the Danish monarch
 

Lord Talbot

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"Oaths of allegiance to the Crown are fairly common in British public life and are similar to those in other countries where a declaration of loyalty is made to the state."

Swearing in and the parliamentary oath - UK Parliament


I for one think their is a big difference to swearing an oath to a state than a particular family. Is it not time that the UK changes this requirement for its elected representatives?
The Crown is an institution, not a family, or a person. When people talk about "The Crown", they're talking about the legal entity, not Elizabeth Windsor.

If you want to critique the British political system, fair enough. But at least have a basic grasp of it before clambering onto that high horse.
 

cricket

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ETA: since 1992 the monarch is invested by a joint session of both houses of the dutch parliament - so it has become a secular thing, with some nods toward religion. As I understand it the current Queen Consort is a Catholic.
Who or what is a "queen consort" ? Sounds like a breed of dogs.
 

McSlaggart

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The Crown is an institution, not a family, or a person. When people talk about "The Crown", they're talking about the legal entity, not Elizabeth Windsor.

If you want to critique the British political system, fair enough. But at least have a basic grasp of it before clambering onto that high horse.
I did say "a particular family" the head of state in the uk may change but it will still be one of current queens family.
 

GDPR

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The oath of allegiance is not identical throughout the UK. Take the police:

The English and Welsh language oath is:

I, ... of ... do solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will well and truly serve the Queen in the office of constable ....

The Scottish one is:

“I, do solemnly, sincerely and truly declare and affirm that I will faithfully discharge the duties of the office of constable with fairness, integrity, diligence and impartiality,and that I will uphold fundamental human rights and accord equal respect to all people, according to law.”

The N Irish one is:

I hereby do solemnly and sincerely and truly declare and affirm that I will faithfully discharge the duties of the office of constable, with fairness, integrity, diligence and impartiality, upholding fundamental human rights and according equal respect to all individuals and their traditions and beliefs; and that while I continue to hold the said office I will to the best of my skill and knowledge discharge all the duties thereof according to law.
 


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