• Due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software, some users were "banned" when they tried to change their passwords at the end of February. This does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you were affected by this, please contact us.

OECD review of Irish Aid



islands

Active member
Joined
Sep 1, 2008
Messages
103
Well it could have been less positive - no real need for the OECD to gush over Irish Aid that I can see unless they were doing a good job
 

cain1798

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2003
Messages
418
Where are people starving to death right now and where 'Irish Aid' is keeping them alive?

Where are we helping the Blind to see?
Well blind people are pretty much blind. I'm not sure Irish Aid, or anyone, is claiming they're curing blindness, and that's not what toxic avenger claimed.

In terms of answering your first question, Ethiopia.

Irish Aid in Ethiopia supports the Productive Safety Nets programme. The Safety Net programme attempts to alleviate the vulnerability to food shortages experienced by many Ethiopians. Malnutrition in Ethiopia is widespread with 47% of children under five suffering from wasting or stunting. Over half the population lives below the national poverty line; in some regions of the country this incidence of poverty is as high as 70%, and it is close to 85% in the worst-affected regions. For many Ethiopians, food security is uncertain even in good harvest years.

The Productive Safety Nets programme provides cash or food to 7 million chronically food insecure people in exchange for their participation in public works including building roads, schools and rehabilitating degraded land. Ireland contributed €10 million to this programme in 2007. Without this support by Ireland in conjunction with the UK, the European Commission, the World Bank, UN World Food Programme, USAID and Canada, it is estimated that between 5 and 7 million people in Ethiopia would face starvation each year.

(Irish Aid - Country - Ethiopia)

For all I know in others of the countries IrishAid has a relationship with but I just picked the first one in the list fairly confident I'd get the material I needed and there ye go.

In terms of the second question, look under the health and water sanitation tabs. Preventable forms of blindness are often associated with clean water and IrishAid is investing money in projects delivering water sanitation projects in many parts of Africa.

There's a false argument here. The suggestion is that we should spend money to alleviate the suffering of people here in Ireland. I agree with that. Actually I think we should spend a lot more money doing that. I don't think it's impossible for us to do that and to meet our pledges on international aid. I don't think it's a choice between helping homeless people in Dublin and helping starving people in Malawi.

It's a simpler choice.

It's a choice between whether the JP McManus' of the world gets a second yacht or whether a school in Uganda gets a water supply. People who are suffering in Ireland are not suffering because of people in Uganda. They're suffering because they're being exploited by Irish business and being undermined and left defenceless by the Irish Government. It's a peculiar sort of response to decide the best way to respond to Irish people exploiting other Irish people is to leave starving communities without food.
 

cain1798

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2003
Messages
418
Er Right....

How do you know Irish Aid are telling the Truth?

BTW please don't tell us the Ethiopian Government are inacple of feedong their own people.

Read this:

Ethiopian National Defense Force - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

They can afford to maintain huge armed forces all the same.
Well that's why the OECD reviews them. It's why they're obliged to report to the Oireachtas and to account to it. It's why the Department of Foreign Affairs also carries out its own reviews of Irish Aid and it's independently audited.

I suppose it's possible that close to a dozen governments, the Oireachtas, an entire civil service department, development ngos and organisations, the OECD, independent monitors, policy analysts, academics and journalists who have visited Irish Aid projects are all engaged in a massive conspiracy to divert that money to...ummm...I don't know..

I'm also curious as to what evidence you have for Irish Aid lieing?

On Ethiopia, I didn't look at the link (Sorry) but to be honest I assumed they had a huge army. I'd have been shocked if they didn't. It's less than a decade since they fought a three year war with their next door neighbour with almost a couple of hundred thousand casualties. I'm all for reducing your military spending but I tend to have a more relaxed view of countries with big armies who've recently had to use them.

The other thing is that people often think that the problem is one of money, or corruption. And it certainly can be. It can also be lack of education. For example, Irish Aid have helped introduce new maize seeds to Tanzania. It's doubled the amount of maize farms can produce. http://www.irishaid.gov.ie/Uploads/Tanzania_improved maize.pdf You don't need money, as much as education and research, also costing money of course but not in the same way.

One last thing, as I'm off to bed. Irish Aid have offices on the top of O'Connell Street. They're open to the public and have a huge amount of information about what they do. They also have people there to answer your questions. It's your money and you've every right to go in and ask them what they're doing with it. I'd highly recommend it next time you're in town.

Ahhh, but I know what you're thinking. How do we know they spent the money on an office? Maybe they lied and it's not really there and then you would have wasted the trip into town.

Don't worry chara, I've got your back. I've been in it a couple of times (No, I don't work for Irish Aid or any organisation funded by Irish Aid or have ever worked for any organisation ever funded by Irish Aid) and it's definitely there.
 

islands

Active member
Joined
Sep 1, 2008
Messages
103
BTW please don't tell us the Ethiopian Government are inacple of feedong their own people.
Many governments don't seem to look after their people in the way in which aggregate economic figures would suggest that they are capable of. You don't have to look too far for an example of a country that up to recently was hailed as a roaring success economically, with a health system that just doesn't work, substandard education ... I could go on and on.

Simple and sad fact is, rich countries have poor people too! And poor countries spend money badly sometimes

Irish Aid, in my very limited experience of them, work with partner groups, so they're helping build capacity within communities overseas, not just sloshing cash into some government fund.
 

Catalpa

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2004
Messages
10,257
Many governments don't seem to look after their people in the way in which aggregate economic figures would suggest that they are capable of. You don't have to look too far for an example of a country that up to recently was hailed as a roaring success economically, with a health system that just doesn't work, substandard education ... I could go on and on.

Simple and sad fact is, rich countries have poor people too! And poor countries spend money badly sometimes

Irish Aid, in my very limited experience of them, work with partner groups, so they're helping build capacity within communities overseas, not just sloshing cash into some government fund.
Check out what they give the Government of Tanzania so - no strings attached other then 'promises'...
 

Lefournier

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2008
Messages
117
Where are people starving to death right now and where 'Irish Aid' is keeping them alive?

Where are we helping the Blind to see?
1. Starvation:
Irish Aid is a major supporter of Concern, the Irish NGO which is on the frontline of the fight against hunger
AN Irish aid agency is revolutionising the way world hunger is dealt with through a new policy of takeaway food supplies.The approach by Concern allows famine victims to return to their families and work instead of keeping them dependent on emergency camps. So far it has halved death rates from hunger in Malawi to 5pc, in areas where it is used. The rate in emergency feeding centres is 12pc. The World Health Organisation has made Concern's system an official policy for tackling hunger.
Revolutionary Irish aid method halves starvation death rate - National News, Frontpage - Independent.ie

2. Blindness
Thanks to Irish Aid’s generous funding, ORBIS will continue to help eliminate avoidable blindness and restore sight in developing countries. For more details on Irish Aid, please visit Irish Aid - Homepage -.
ORBIS - Irish Aid Reports Progress in ORBIS's Work in Ethiopia

The OECD is an important barometer of our aid policies and the report points to the issues that decentralisation poses for this work. It also highlights the recent cuts in our spending. Yes, we should be rigorous in demanding value for money on our aid spend and especially that this aid is reaching the most needy but we can't simply abandon our commitment to the most vulnerable people on earth.
 

Catalpa

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2004
Messages
10,257
1. Starvation:
Irish Aid is a major supporter of Concern, the Irish NGO which is on the frontline of the fight against hunger
Revolutionary Irish aid method halves starvation death rate - National News, Frontpage - Independent.ie

2. Blindness

ORBIS - Irish Aid Reports Progress in ORBIS's Work in Ethiopia

The OECD is an important barometer of our aid policies and the report points to the issues that decentralisation poses for this work. It also highlights the recent cuts in our spending. Yes, we should be rigorous in demanding value for money on our aid spend and especially that this aid is reaching the most needy but we can't simply abandon our commitment to the most vulnerable people on earth.
'we can't simply abandon our commitment to the most vulnerable people on earth'

If Hochis remarks on the radio this evening as reported on another Thread turn out to be correct then:

OH YES WE WILL
 

islands

Active member
Joined
Sep 1, 2008
Messages
103
Check out what they give the Government of Tanzania so - no strings attached other then 'promises'...
I took a quick look just now. I'm not expert on the area, but it seems they fund, with other donors, a lot of the health schemes run by the country. Seems to be saving lives, to be honest.

the decline in infant and child mortality is the highest seen in any country in Sub Saharan Africa since 2000 and the annual percentage decline in <5 mortality is the highest seen in the world
ReliefWeb » Document » Irish Aid Tanzania - Fact sheet on health 6 Dec 2007
http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/RWFiles2007.nsf/FilesByRWDocUnidFilename/KHII-7A43A9-full_report.pdf/$File/full_report.pdf
And as for accountability,

As a result, sector planning, budgeting,
[FONT=Arial,Arial][FONT=Arial,Arial]monitoring and reporting processes are well-developed with strong partnership between government and [/FONT][/FONT]donors. The donors that support Tanzania's health sector meet regularly to decide jointly on policy issues. [FONT=Arial,Arial][FONT=Arial,Arial]Current restructuring of the health donor group will provide an opportunity for Irish Aid to take a leading [/FONT][/FONT]role in chairing the group from July 2007.



 

Catalpa

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2004
Messages
10,257
Well that's why the OECD reviews them. It's why they're obliged to report to the Oireachtas and to account to it. It's why the Department of Foreign Affairs also carries out its own reviews of Irish Aid and it's independently audited.

I suppose it's possible that close to a dozen governments, the Oireachtas, an entire civil service department, development ngos and organisations, the OECD, independent monitors, policy analysts, academics and journalists who have visited Irish Aid projects are all engaged in a massive conspiracy to divert that money to...ummm...I don't know..

I'm also curious as to what evidence you have for Irish Aid lieing?

On Ethiopia, I didn't look at the link (Sorry) but to be honest I assumed they had a huge army. I'd have been shocked if they didn't. It's less than a decade since they fought a three year war with their next door neighbour with almost a couple of hundred thousand casualties. I'm all for reducing your military spending but I tend to have a more relaxed view of countries with big armies who've recently had to use them.

The other thing is that people often think that the problem is one of money, or corruption. And it certainly can be. It can also be lack of education. For example, Irish Aid have helped introduce new maize seeds to Tanzania. It's doubled the amount of maize farms can produce. http://www.irishaid.gov.ie/Uploads/Tanzania_improved maize.pdf You don't need money, as much as education and research, also costing money of course but not in the same way.

One last thing, as I'm off to bed. Irish Aid have offices on the top of O'Connell Street. They're open to the public and have a huge amount of information about what they do. They also have people there to answer your questions. It's your money and you've every right to go in and ask them what they're doing with it. I'd highly recommend it next time you're in town.

Ahhh, but I know what you're thinking. How do we know they spent the money on an office? Maybe they lied and it's not really there and then you would have wasted the trip into town.

Don't worry chara, I've got your back. I've been in it a couple of times (No, I don't work for Irish Aid or any organisation funded by Irish Aid or have ever worked for any organisation ever funded by Irish Aid) and it's definitely there.
Oh don't worry mo Chara I will indeed do that....

However as I have already written quite a lot on this Scandal already

- and to avoid having to type it all out again I refer you to the following threads for further Information:

http://www.politics.ie/current-affairs/56509-irish-aid-they-running-scared.html


http://www.politics.ie/foreign-affairs/51334-hearings-irish-aid-start.html

http://www.politics.ie/foreign-affairs/26853-irish-aid-what-have-they-got-hide-s-our-money-btw.html


Enjoy!
 

Gadfly

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 14, 2007
Messages
354
I'm all for reducing your military spending but I tend to have a more relaxed view of countries with big armies who've recently had to use them.
Big problem here. The lengthy and disastrous border war was a war of choice; Ethiopia did not have to pursue it. That's not to say that there was no fault on the Eritrean side, but that does not give a free pass to Ethiopia to binge on military hardware.

The choice to spend on military hardware is a choice not to spend on economic development or social programmes, and this is a dilemma that donors have not faced up to. I cannot see that aid for countries engaged in a war of aggression is anything other than support for their war effort.

There is of course a reason why donors pussyfoot around this; they are also selling the munitions. Development assistance in this scenario is a disguised grant to western (and Russian and Chinese) arms producers; without it, these pisspoor countries would not be able to pursue such effective population reduction strategies.
 

Cynicist

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 22, 2010
Messages
11,055
Every four years the OECD DAC undertakes a peer review of its' members aid programme. Read the latest Peer Review Report to find out what they had to say about Ireland's aid programme.

Delivering Results - Irish Aid - Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

On the basis of above, the 4 year OECD review of Irish Aid is way overdue.
Can't wait to see the next whitewash of Irish Aid effectiveness carried out by evaluators intent on maintaining aid at its highest level of public acceptability.

The last major review advised government to work on projecting positive aid results - does'nt appear that they have any results to project so maybe that is why the review is on hold.
 

Catalpast

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 17, 2012
Messages
25,564
Every four years the OECD DAC undertakes a peer review of its' members aid programme. Read the latest Peer Review Report to find out what they had to say about Ireland's aid programme.

Delivering Results - Irish Aid - Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

On the basis of above, the 4 year OECD review of Irish Aid is way overdue.
Can't wait to see the next whitewash of Irish Aid effectiveness carried out by evaluators intent on maintaining aid at its highest level of public acceptability.

The last major review advised government to work on projecting positive aid results - does'nt appear that they have any results to project so maybe that is why the review is on hold.
It is amazing that when the Troika was in town that they never tackled this one

- €600 Million + taken out of the Irish Economy every year

- and no mention of it ever made!!!
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top