Official Languages Act- road signage

DJP

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
12,620
Recently I asked an opposition party spokesperson to put down a question to Minister Éamon Ó Cuív asking him when he plans to implement the section of the Official Languages Act that deals with road signage.

Under the section of the act it is envisaged that all future road signage with have comhstádas/equal status to Irish and English.

Currently as you all probably know Irish is in an inferior smaller position on most of our road signage sending out the message that the Government is not serious about the language.

According to Éamon Ó Cuív- from the legal advice he has received- this section of the act cannot be implemented.

Surely changing the Department of Transport road signage guidelines would be a simple straightforward matter for Noel Dempsey- an Irish speaker?

Perhaps IBEC do not agree with implementing this section of the act? Either way could FF/GP/PD members on this site tell me if they are going to do anything within their parties to try to get this section of the act implemented?
 


easygoing

Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2006
Messages
78
To be honest the Department of Transport's first priority with regard to road signage is the imminent wastage of large amounts of money on green gantry signs being erected on all the new High Quality Dual Carriageways being constructed as part of the Major Interurban Routeways project, which have not yet been redesignated 'motorway'.

If green signage is erected - as has happened in a number of locations - and then the HQDCs are redesignated motorway - and this will happen - then local authorities will have to replace the green signage with blue signage. This will be a costly and futile exercise, and it will in no small measure be the fault of the tiny number if nimbys and oddball contrarians who wish to deprive this nation of a motorway network.
 

DJP

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
12,620
In case anyone does not know it is not proposed to replace all our current signage with signage that has comhstádas. Only future road signage and signs that misspell placenames is envisaged.
 

Rebel CNC

Active member
Joined
Apr 2, 2007
Messages
286
Hardly the burning issue of our times. From a safety point of view, it would make more sense to do away with Irish on road signs altogether - having two languages just adds clutter to the signage.
 

DJP

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
12,620
Rebel CNC said:
Hardly the burning issue of our times. From a safety point of view, it would make more sense to do away with Irish on road signs altogether - having two languages just adds clutter to the signage.
There are no safety problems in Wales and Canda although English is still by far the most popular languages there.
 

Schuhart

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2006
Messages
4,831
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
In case anyone does not know it is not proposed to replace all our current signage with signage that has comhstádas. Only future road signage and signs that misspell placenames is envisaged.
I barely care enough to log on to point out that, with the economy predicted to go into recession for the first time since the eighties, this is really the kind of shite we could do without.

Any chance of just leaving your hobby at home instead of inflicting it on the political system?
 

Schuhart

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2006
Messages
4,831
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
Schuhart said:
Any chance of just leaving your hobby at home instead of inflicting it on the political system?
No.
I was afraid of that. Shite, it'll be a long recession. By the time we come out of it, Sub Saharan Africa will have caught up with us.

Oh, and Save the Valentia Island Radio Station, and any other load of old bollocks.
 

Keith-M

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 24, 2007
Messages
15,668
Website
www.allkindsofeverything.ie
There are so few people in this country who speak Irish Gaelic and not English that there should be nothing only English on our road signs except in the Gaelteacht areas. Road sign have a purpose. They are not linguistic totem polls.
 

stfrancis

Member
Joined
May 31, 2008
Messages
16
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
In case anyone does not know it is not proposed to replace all our current signage with signage that has comhstádas. Only future road signage and signs that misspell placenames is envisaged.
seen as irish is only spoken by a few people in rural areas of cork/kerry/galway/donegal the signs in those areas should be bilingual but this talibani shite of enforcing an ill thought out pice of legislation (dreamt of by devalers grandson when we were at the height of the tiger) does nothing for promoting 'our' national language
 

DJP

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
12,620
stfrancis said:
but this talibani shite of enforcing an ill thought out pice of legislation (dreamt of by devalers grandson when we were at the height of the tiger) does nothing for promoting 'our' national language
Rubbish. Comhstádas on our road signage sends out good signals for the language. It says that the language is respected as a national language. It has a good effect and affect both consciously and unconsciously.
 

stfrancis

Member
Joined
May 31, 2008
Messages
16
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
stfrancis said:
but this talibani shite of enforcing an ill thought out pice of legislation (dreamt of by devalers grandson when we were at the height of the tiger) does nothing for promoting 'our' national language
Rubbish. Comhstádas on our road signage sends out good signals for the language. It says that the language is respected as a national language. It has a good effect and affect both consciously and unconsciously.
it has no effect consciously or unconsciously, when are ye people going to accept that this language must stand on its own 2 feet. huge state funding and subvention as well as mandatory learning have marginally increased the language use in the last 80 years. having it on roadsigns will have no affect except to confuse non irish nationals and of course cost more money from the english speaking majority
 

DJP

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
12,620
stfrancis said:
having it on roadsigns will have no affect except to confuse non irish nationals and of course cost more money from the english speaking majority
It won't cost much if any money as the issue relates to future road signage. The actual sign posts will be the same size. Only the Irish will be printed in the same size and font as the English.
 

gisbwoy

New member
Joined
Dec 26, 2007
Messages
2
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
Currently as you all probably know Irish is in an inferior smaller position on most of our road signage sending out the message that the Government is not serious about the language.
Lol.. the only message it sends out is YIELD or STOP

Drivers have a split second to read a sign, they don't want to accidentally gaze at Irish and not understand it.

Maybe while you're campaigning for €millions to be spent on replacing perfectly good roadsigns in a recession, you can ask the Government if they would consider putting English on the roadsigns in the Gaeltacht area of Meath.. to cater for the 99% English speaking minority.
 

blucey

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 4, 2007
Messages
366
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
stfrancis said:
but this talibani shite of enforcing an ill thought out pice of legislation (dreamt of by devalers grandson when we were at the height of the tiger) does nothing for promoting 'our' national language
Rubbish. Comhstádas on our road signage sends out good signals for the language. It says that the language is respected as a national language. It has a good effect and affect both consciously and unconsciously.
WTF is a Comhstádas?
 

DJP

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
12,620
gisbwoy said:
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
Currently as you all probably know Irish is in an inferior smaller position on most of our road signage sending out the message that the Government is not serious about the language.
Lol.. the only message it sends out is YIELD or STOP

Drivers have a split second to read a sign, they don't want to accidentally gaze at Irish and not understand it.

Maybe while you're campaigning for €millions to be spent on replacing perfectly good roadsigns in a recession, you can ask the Government if they would consider putting English on the roadsigns in the Gaeltacht area of Meath.. to cater for the 99% English speaking minority.
You obviously have not read my above posts. It would be a good idea to read the posts on a thread before you jump in and make factually incorrect comments.
 

Trefor

Active member
Joined
Sep 6, 2004
Messages
273
Website
oclmenai.blogspot.com
gisbwoy said:
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
Currently as you all probably know Irish is in an inferior smaller position on most of our road signage sending out the message that the Government is not serious about the language.
Lol.. the only message it sends out is YIELD or STOP

Drivers have a split second to read a sign, they don't want to accidentally gaze at Irish and not understand it.
This argument was used before the introduction of bilingual roadsigns in Wales.

When they were implemented there was no effect on road safety.

If it's of any interest bilingual roadsigns are compulsory in Wales, but which language comes first is left to local authorities. As a rule of thumb Welsh comes first where it's a majority language & second where it isn't.
 

stfrancis

Member
Joined
May 31, 2008
Messages
16
Darren Mac an Phríora said:
gisbwoy said:
[quote="Darren Mac an Phríora":1vz4prc6]

Currently as you all probably know Irish is in an inferior smaller position on most of our road signage sending out the message that the Government is not serious about the language.
Lol.. the only message it sends out is YIELD or STOP

Drivers have a split second to read a sign, they don't want to accidentally gaze at Irish and not understand it.

Maybe while you're campaigning for €millions to be spent on replacing perfectly good roadsigns in a recession, you can ask the Government if they would consider putting English on the roadsigns in the Gaeltacht area of Meath.. to cater for the 99% English speaking minority.
You obviously have not read my above posts. It would be a good idea to read the posts on a thread before you jump in and make factually incorrect comments.[/quote:1vz4prc6]

you cant argue with this crowd. they live in a little gaelic speaking paradise looking down their long gaelgoir noses at the plebs who dont speak the most beautiful language in the whole wide world. sure they dont care about road safety or inconvenience for non irish speakers, as long as precious gaelic is displayed in every single state document and sign (regardless of cost to english speaking majority)
 

Trefor

Active member
Joined
Sep 6, 2004
Messages
273
Website
oclmenai.blogspot.com
I'm honestly mystified why this is a matter of controvesy.

Nobody - nobody - whatever the language they use gives it a second thought here.
 

stfrancis

Member
Joined
May 31, 2008
Messages
16
Trefor said:
I'm honestly mystified why this is a matter of controvesy.

Nobody - nobody - whatever the language they use gives it a second thought here.
different countries, different people. just because its no problem for your people. there is a very enthusuastic state funded irish language lobby in this country, while at the same time there is a large amount of people who have no feelings whatsoever about the language and soem others who genuinely hate it.however this post is about money and road safety and is being exploited by irish language zealots to force governement to implement a pointless and abused act of legislation which did not affect this country when the celtic tiger was in full swing but now that we are in recession is beginning to bite
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top