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Alan Alda

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Old IRA sat on the sidelines for decades. God bless the useless old timers. We remember them by wearing stupid 1920s hats.
 

Alan Alda

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Still as hardline as ever in his views and with zero time for Gerry Adams.
Why ?
Does he not believe in the revolution he helped start?
Just doesnt like uppity nornies maybe?
Hardline about what exactly?
Let me guess , he votes FG/FF now, being a revolutionary hardliner an all?:rolleyes:
Im amused. Not just at your granpa but at all delusional 'republican' idiots and how little they actually achieved.
Never have so many been so proud of such little 'victories'.
 

diy01

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Still as hardline as ever in his views and with zero time for Gerry Adams.
That's right. About five years ago McKee mocked Adams's continued denials of IRA membership. McKee may have drifted away from the Provos but he strikes me as a man whose word is still widely respected and believed by republicans of all stripes, considering he was an active volunteer from 1939 to 1977 and one of the most prominent figures in the Belfast Brigade.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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My Family were deeply involved in the Old IRA.
That whole organization turned into a bunch of dreamers .
Dreaming similar to So called dreams of Patrick Pearse who drifted into realms of fantasy that Ireland could only survive as a Catholic Gaelic speaking entity as if there was some Mythological evidence from on high as to there being some glorious past to be reignited
And when things turned sour in the North they were in such a dreamland that their ability to react was so suppressed that they became irrelevant.
Do you recall if this was a pledge made in print or was it at a commemoration etc? I'd like to learn more.
I haven't yet found any references to how former/retired IRA volunteers of the 1916-1950s eras reacted to the emergence of the Provisionals in 1969.


Curious journey



Ireland - A Television History - Part 9 of 13 - 'Terror 1919-1921'

Tom Barry and Maire Comerford are interviewed in the first video, and Vinny Byrne and Dan Breen are interviewed in the second one, as well as a number of other people. Tom Barry supported the Provisionals, but at the same time, he resigned in 1937 specifically because he disagreed with the forthcoming bombing campaign organized by Seán Russell.

''The Civil War was fought out more zealously in the Gaelic League than in any other organisation.When the Free Staters failed to take over the League they then tried to kill it. The Gaelic bureaucrats of the new State, “the starched-shirt brigade” as Seosamh Mac Grianna* called them-paraded themselves as being much more respectable than the Gaelic League. Enemies of the Gaelic are mistaken when they think of the language as part of a bureaucratic state which is trying to force the language on the people. It was never thus. In the early days of the Free State George McNicholl declared publicly that “by hog,dog and devil” he would establish the Gaelic language. Scarcely had his breath cooled when Ernest Blythe, Minister of Finance, Deputy Head of State, a big man for the Gaelic, refuted McNicholl.' - Máirtín Ó Cadhain

*Seosamh Mac Grianna:

There’s an online list of all of his writings which were compiled after the Civil War* up as far as the mid 1930’s called The Papers of Seosamh Mac Grianna.

* After a spell of teaching in Ranafast, Mac Grianna became involved in IRA politics and military action in a propagandist role, writing plays, during the War of Independence and in the Civil War, when he joined the anti-Treaty side. He was probably not involved in actual fighting, but was imprisoned by the Free State in August 1922 for the rest of the Civil War.

Dá mbíodh ruball ar an éan, If this bird had a tail, was an appendix to an earlier book Mo bhealach féin, My own way, however, about his wanderings in Ireland and Wales of 1933, written in Wicklow in 1935, which was published in 1940, then there was supposed to be another book called An Ruball, The Tail, which according to The Papers of Seosamh Mac Grianna just disappeared. In the second edition of Dá mbíodh ruball ar an éan, there's a number of letters, one from 1935 from Mac Grianna himself, in which he said that he was terrified that his work would be interfered with. 'Tá eagla orm go mbeadh sibh ag iarraidh athrach a dhéanamh inti, agus ní thabharfainn cead sin a dhéanamh. - I’m terrified that ye will alter what I have written down, and ye don’t have my permission to do so.' After that he had a breakdown, and the following letter then comes from his wife, pleading for help which is dated 1936. After that his wife committed suicide, and his son was killed.* Then in 1969 there’s yet again another letter from a psychiatrist in which Mac Grianna is claiming to have finished his earlier work, An Ruball.

Mac Grianna's health did not improve on returning to Donegal. Peggy committed suicide in 1959, and their son Fionn drowned himself in Dublin Bay in the same year . Mac Grianna was then placed in St.Conall's Hospital in Letterkenny where he stayed for most of the 31 years until his death on 11 June 1990.

Tá sé as a chéill adeir daoine. Ach an bhfuil? Ní fhaca mise cúis ar bith lena mheas nach raibh a chiall aige.

People say he’s mad. But is he? I’ve seen nothing to persuade me that he is mad and that he hasn’t got his wits about him.

That’s what the the author of The Papers of Seosamh Mac Grianna said about him, although Mac Grianna in one of his letters half-heartedly asked people to forgive him. ‘I want to ask anybody in the office I have offended to forgive me’, which would suggest that perhaps he had a bit a darker side, or he was at least a wee bit cantankerous at times. It’s a damning indictment of An Gúm however and the State who also copyrighted his writings, that he was treated so badly. The more you seem to look into his story the sadder it becomes. Other Gaeltacht writers and teachers such as Máirtín Ó Cadhain seem to have held him in very high regard, and Ó Cadhain also seems to have been heavily influenced by his ideas concerning the language, as he references him in A Movement Astray, which isn’t online but there are extracts available elsewhere on this site. Guide To G42 - The Papers of Seosamh Mac Grianna
Ó Cadhain left the Republican Movement a year after Tom Barry, not only because he disagreed with the military tactics proposed by Russell, but also because of the absence of a viable economic and political program. Éire Nua and Saol Nua were fleshed out versions of the ideas in A Movement Astray, which Ó Cadhain penned at a later date. Ó Cadhain was hounded out of Galway by the Church, and he was interned in the 1940's, and the quote above sums up the real nature of the relationship between the Church, the State and the Republican Movement. It's not something trendy Left Liberals or Labour historians like having pointed out to them, because it doesn't suit their interpretation of Irish history, and the narrative being pushed by people such as Londonpride above. The relationship which existed between Blythe and Mac Grianna was replicated across the board for half a century. In 1965 Barry made a symbolic gesture when he unveiled a statue of Collins in Cork, in an attempt to heal the open wounds of the Civil War.
 

Connollyist a/c no.2

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Do you recall if this was a pledge made in print or was it at a commemoration etc? I'd like to learn more.

I would guess that virtually all veterans of the post-Civil War IRA like Tony Magan supported the Provos.



That's true, although Flannery later sided with Republican Sinn Féin at the time of the split in 1986, as did George Harrison who had been one of the major arms suppliers to the Provisionals in the 1970s and early Eighties.

Very very few Northern republicans sided with RSF in 1986. Seán Keenan from Derry and Billy McKee were two of the only prominent individuals who did so. McKee is still alive and recently provided a statement of support to the republican socialist organisation Saoradh, which has links to the New IRA.
I honestly do not know. However he later expressed reservations about the Provos despite initially supporting them.

"Finally, Barry certainly remained strongly republican all his life but he was both openly and privately critical of the Provisional IRA. He felt that an Ireland ‘free and overflowing with milk and honey’ would not have been worth the cost of the Birmingham bombing of 1974. In 1976 he refused to sign a letter of support for republican prisoners, arguing that the Provisional IRA had lost support because of its own recent activities, activities that he as an old IRA man could not countenance. The correspondence is undated but I suspect it was written in the aftermath of the Kingsmills killings of January that year."

Source -https://www.historyireland.com/20th-century-contemporary-history/tom-barry/

Here's two interesting videos I found on youtube with interviews from Barry and other Old IRA veterans on the Troubles

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBv1xB-r-EY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGOAtAC8KQw
 

Talk Back

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My Family were deeply involved in the Old IRA.
That whole organization turned into a bunch of dreamers .
Dreaming similar to So called dreams of Patrick Pearse who drifted into realms of fantasy that Ireland could only survive as a Catholic Gaelic speaking entity as if there was some Mythological evidence from on high as to there being some glorious past to be reignited
And when things turned sour in the North they were in such a dreamland that their ability to react was so suppressed that they became irrelevant.
Ireland existed as a nation, and was recognised as such by the western world - with its own High King, language, writing (both Ogham and 18 letter alphabet), Law - the very essence of a unitary State, long before the 10th century upstart England even existed.

When the Roman Empire fell, Irish people saved the western world by opening centres of learning throughout Europe - meanwhile, people in Britain were walking around on their knuckles.
 

InsideImDancing

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Generally supported it I believe.
 

InsideImDancing

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My Family were deeply involved in the Old IRA.
That whole organization turned into a bunch of dreamers .
Dreaming similar to So called dreams of Patrick Pearse who drifted into realms of fantasy that Ireland could only survive as a Catholic Gaelic speaking entity as if there was some Mythological evidence from on high as to there being some glorious past to be reignited
And when things turned sour in the North they were in such a dreamland that their ability to react was so suppressed that they became irrelevant.
Just by living in England you have become anti-Irish. :)

I deeply pity you.

Your IQ can't be higher than 100. Literally.. it's impossible.

You are one of the stupidest people I've ever encountered in life.

All the best.
 

InsideImDancing

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Why ?
Does he not believe in the revolution he helped start?
Just doesnt like uppity nornies maybe?
Hardline about what exactly?
Let me guess , he votes FG/FF now, being a revolutionary hardliner an all?:rolleyes:
Im amused. Not just at your granpa but at all delusional 'republican' idiots and how little they actually achieved.
Never have so many been so proud of such little 'victories'.
He's a Belfast man. :)
 

InsideImDancing

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I honestly do not know. However he later expressed reservations about the Provos despite initially supporting them.

"Finally, Barry certainly remained strongly republican all his life but he was both openly and privately critical of the Provisional IRA. He felt that an Ireland ‘free and overflowing with milk and honey’ would not have been worth the cost of the Birmingham bombing of 1974. In 1976 he refused to sign a letter of support for republican prisoners, arguing that the Provisional IRA had lost support because of its own recent activities, activities that he as an old IRA man could not countenance. The correspondence is undated but I suspect it was written in the aftermath of the Kingsmills killings of January that year."

Source -https://www.historyireland.com/20th-century-contemporary-history/tom-barry/

Here's two interesting videos I found on youtube with interviews from Barry and other Old IRA veterans on the Troubles

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBv1xB-r-EY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGOAtAC8KQw
He was jealous. They did a far better job than he did. Far better. Superior in pretty much every department. Barry would not have got into the PIRA in their pomp. That's the reality, jump up and down all you want.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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Joe Clarke, John Joe Sheehy, Michael Flannery, Nora Connolly (daughter of the executed Connolly) and Maire Comeford (All 1916 veterans) were Provo supporters.
Connolly supported the politics of Costello. One of my relatives was fined for attending a banned Easter Rising commemoration with Comerford, before being banned from the Labour Party. Ó Brádaigh was the leader at that point in time. Máire Drumm senior, RIP, also attended the same commemoration. She was assassinated not long afterwards, by one of the Death Squads. Through sheer coincidence, another one of my relatives attended to a wounded rebel during the rising, who I think was attached to the Mount Street section, yards away from where the last IRA volunteer was killed in the south, before the ceasefire 78 years later.
 

FOURGREENFIELDS

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Tom Barry and Dan Breen interviews are available to watch on YouTube. Very revealing, Tom Barry stated that while England occupied and had military personnel in Ireland there would NEVER be peace. Dan Breen in 1967 still looked and sounded as a committed hawk about Britain's occupation of the island. He said that his ONLY regret about his time as a Republican activist was that he didn't send MORE British soldiers back to their country in boxes.
 

McTell

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//

He said that his ONLY regret about his time as a Republican activist was that he didn't send MORE British soldiers back to their country in boxes.

It's so much easier to pull a trigger than to get the economy on track and growing, which was what this generation of patriots failed to do for decades later.

30 years later the emigration rate was the highest in western europe... everyone was still leaving school at 14
 

Boy M5

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He was jealous. They did a far better job than he did. Far better. Superior in pretty much every department. Barry would not have got into the PIRA in their pomp. That's the reality, jump up and down all you want.
No provo attack compares to Crossbarry or Kilmichael

He was seen as an inspiration by the provos.

Barry left the IRA over the targeting of civilians in 1930s.
 

sgtharper

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Tom Barry and Dan Breen interviews are available to watch on YouTube. Very revealing, Tom Barry stated that while England occupied and had military personnel in Ireland there would NEVER be peace.
Well he was wrong then wasn't he? As we can all see.
Dan Breen in 1967 still looked and sounded as a committed hawk about Britain's occupation of the island.
Yes, in total denial of reality as was usual with his kind. The existence of over a million Unionists who wanted nothing to do with a united Ireland or a republic was simply too difficult for them to understand or even contemplate.
He said that his ONLY regret about his time as a Republican activist was that he didn't send MORE British soldiers back to their country in boxes.
Pyschopathic old loon, a pity he was ever born.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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Tom Barry and Dan Breen interviews are available to watch on YouTube. Very revealing, Tom Barry stated that while England occupied and had military personnel in Ireland there would NEVER be peace. Dan Breen in 1967 still looked and sounded as a committed hawk about Britain's occupation of the island. He said that his ONLY regret about his time as a Republican activist was that he didn't send MORE British soldiers back to their country in boxes.
Well he was wrong then wasn't he?
You have twisted what he said, and you are accrediting a comment made by one to the other, in a different interview, in a different time-span, under different circumstances. The date of the Breen interview, 1967, is a bit of a giveaway, and Republicans were committed to a political path at that point in time. The Barry interview and comments are post-1969.
 

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