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Only 1,106 Public Servants Receiving Pensions In Excess of €50,000


YouKnowWhatIMeanLike

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Apr 13, 2011
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7,225
the bad news is that they cost the exchequer €65.6 million annually. but the good news sure is that Brendan Howlin can do something about the worst of excesses here easily I'd say.

Howlin counts the following cohorts according to the article in the IT by Gordon Deegan Brendan

103 of them rip 100k+ a year
20 make €90,001 and €100,000
37 make €80,001 to €90,000
48 make €70,001 to €80,000
260 make €60,001 to €70,000
638 make €50,000 to €60,000


sure a drop in the ocean if you look at the staggering €2.23bn (2010) public service pension bill overall.

but still adjusting the 50,000+ public pension bill a little would be fair game.

However, the data only relates to retired civil servants, the VEC/Institute of Technology sector and seven smaller bodies and agencies. - Irish Independent
 
Last edited:


dresden8

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Feb 5, 2009
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'People in the private sector are getting paltry pensions because private sector industries have mishandled their money. . .'
Need to look elsewhere.
 

Watcher2

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May 2, 2010
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the bad news is that they cost the exchequer €65.6 million annually. but the good news sure is that Brendan Howlin can do something about the worst of excesses here easily I'd say.

Howlin counts the following cohorts according to the article in the IT by Gordon Deegan Brendan

103 of them rip 100k+ a year
20 make €90,001 and €100,000
37 make €80,001 to €90,000
48 make €70,001 to €80,000
260 make €60,001 to €70,000
638 make €50,000 to €60,000


sure a drop in the ocean if you look at the staggering €2.23bn (2010) public service pension bill overall.

but still adjusting the 50,000+ public pension bill a little would be fair game.
50k is still a whopping pension. It's all tax fee, no? What are the stats for say those earning the equivalent of the average private sector wage? In terms of a pension payment which is not taxed if my understanding is correct, that would be an interesting stat and probably more meaningful in the context of finding savings in order to reduce our budget deficit.
 

Mr. Bumble

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YouKnowWhatIMeanLike

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50k is still a whopping pension. It's all tax fee, no? What are the stats for say those earning the equivalent of the average private sector wage? In terms of a pension payment which is not taxed if my understanding is correct, that would be an interesting stat and probably more meaningful in the context of finding savings in order to reduce our budget deficit.
the best part is they have only paid a fraction of that into the pension pot. it's all courtesy of the taxpayer.
 

bob3367

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Jan 11, 2007
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50k is still a whopping pension. It's all tax fee, no? What are the stats for say those earning the equivalent of the average private sector wage? In terms of a pension payment which is not taxed if my understanding is correct, that would be an interesting stat and probably more meaningful in the context of finding savings in order to reduce our budget deficit.
Taxed as normal.
 

Watcher2

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Thanks. Gave you a like as a thanks as opposed to liking the fact that pensioners get taxed. But my point still stands, 50k is still a nice pension. What are the figures starting from average private sector wages? One would suspect that in general a pensioner would not have as many expenses like children to support and educate and a mortgage, although medical may increase. But it's a more meaningful benchmark than just Hal of 100k.
 

dresden8

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Head of the Irish Association of Pension Funds, Gerry Moriarty, explained that 32 of 98 executive directors in leading domestic companies were no longer accruing any pension benefits by 2011.

He said a recent academic paper by Gerry Hughes for the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) found that executive directors were getting 36 times more in pension contributions than other employees.
Bosses getting big payouts as pension pots hit €2.3m - Pensions, Personal Finance - Independent.ie
 

Mr. Bumble

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Thanks. Gave you a like as a thanks as opposed to liking the fact that pensioners get taxed. But my point still stands, 50k is still a nice pension. What are the figures starting from average private sector wages? One would suspect that in general a pensioner would not have as many expenses like children to support and educate and a mortgage, although medical may increase. But it's a more meaningful benchmark than just Hal of 100k.
The average wage is 36k.
 

Watcher2

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the best part is they have only paid a fraction of that into the pension pot. it's all courtesy of the taxpayer.
I think that's a given but is the purpose off this thread to state the obvious and bash ps AGAIN? If so, I'm out of here and I'm not a ps worker but a little tired of the same old bull.
 

Watcher2

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May 2, 2010
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The average wage is 36k.
Any figures for how many ps pensioners receive 36k pension?

And is that the average private sector wage? Just asking for clarity as there are averages for the ps which apparently is highest, and then there is the blended average too.
 

hiding behind a poster

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Mar 8, 2005
Messages
48,387
50k is still a whopping pension. It's all tax fee, no? What are the stats for say those earning the equivalent of the average private sector wage? In terms of a pension payment which is not taxed if my understanding is correct, that would be an interesting stat and probably more meaningful in the context of finding savings in order to reduce our budget deficit.
No its not tax free, and its not a whopping pension.
 

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