Only unionists can create a united Ireland

Schomberg

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Good article by Pete Shirlow in todays Newsletter

The Union is an idea but Northern Ireland is a working reality says PETE SHIRLOW
The issue concerning the Union with Great Britain is not so much a matter of what Northern Ireland will be in 2021 but more about how identity is shifting and adapting to the consequences of devolution and
our ability to shape and fashion shared future


Undoubtedly, identity is being shaped and fashioned by forces, ideas and lifestyles that are beyond the control of the political classes.

The internet, globalisation and changes in the labour market are now the sites in which the present and future are being shaped.

Identity is less likely to be framed by religion, history or 'values' that shaped the island of Ireland in the 20th century.

The once conservative grip on the people of this island changed with the onset of new labour markets, changing consumption practices and the
decline in the relevance of nationalism, whether Irish or British, as articles of complete faith and uncomplicated devotion.

The problem being, many pretend these identities are more important to them than they really are.

evident shifts are to be found in two ways: The Life and Times Survey of 2009 indicated that 47 per cent of Catholic respondents supported the link with the UK, mostly via the option of devolution.

In the recent Westminster elections it could be estimated that some 45 per cent of those from unionist backgrounds did not vote.

Only unionists can create a united Ireland - Belfast Today
 


SevenStars

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Staters and Jaffas coming together....How sweet...

"Since 1923 Ireland has been full of internment camps of one form or another - both in the North and in the South. Despite their differences, there has been a convergence of interests between Belfast, Dublin and London in ensuring that any opposition to the existing states be fought and defeated. The ruling class in Ireland have their own form of self-determination, and they intend to keep it that way. One final word on the state in Eire. There you have Special Courts, internment camps, Offences Against the State Act, censorship, etc. - some «free nation» Arthur Griffith envisaged!"

Amadeo Bordiga.
 

Arracht

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.....decline in the relevance of nationalism, whether Irish or British, as articles of complete faith and uncomplicated devotion.

The problem being, many pretend these identities are more important to them than they really are
Perhaps a reference to outmoded organisations like the orange order?
 

Schomberg

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Perhaps a reference to outmoded organisations like the orange order?
how do you mean? The OO is not a nationalist group. Patriotism and nationalism are not the same thing ;)
 

SlabMurphy

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Good article by Pete Shirlow in todays Newsletter
The Union is an idea but Northern Ireland is a working reality says PETE SHIRLOW
The issue concerning the Union with Great Britain is not so much a matter of what Northern Ireland will be in 2021 but more about how identity is shifting and adapting to the consequences of devolution and
our ability to shape and fashion shared future


Undoubtedly, identity is being shaped and fashioned by forces, ideas and lifestyles that are beyond the control of the political classes.

The internet, globalisation and changes in the labour market are now the sites in which the present and future are being shaped.

Identity is less likely to be framed by religion, history or 'values' that shaped the island of Ireland in the 20th century.

The once conservative grip on the people of this island changed with the onset of new labour markets, changing consumption practices and the
decline in the relevance of nationalism, whether Irish or British, as articles of complete faith and uncomplicated devotion.

The problem being, many pretend these identities are more important to them than they really are.

evident shifts are to be found in two ways: The Life and Times Survey of 2009 indicated that 47 per cent of Catholic respondents supported the link with the UK, mostly via the option of devolution.

In the recent Westminster elections it could be estimated that some 45 per cent of those from unionist backgrounds did not vote.

Only unionists can create a united Ireland - Belfast Today
The good old Life and Times Survey :lol: God do they never tire of trotting that old one out, but then sure their unionists, they have to grasp at every straw.

" some 45 per cent of those from unionist backgrounds did not vote. " I suppose that was from Life and Times Survey also :rolleyes: Yeah, and I could have got a date with Miss World last night :roll:
 

antsrathcam

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I think that the article contains much good sense.

The drive for a separate Northern Ireland was about winning land in an ethnic battle. Which was done.

The drive for a United Ireland was, and is, to reverse that defeat.

The problem for the writer, and his sympathisers, is that the more NI becomes inclusive, and fair, and allows Irish Nationalist people to feel 'at home', the more it's raison d'etre disappears.

We do, after all, live on an island, and are, it would appear, sexually attracted to each other.

The reasons for Protestant separateness in Ireland wither away by the year.

I think there will be a United Ireland, but it won't be the current ROI writ large.

The RC Church had to go - and it's currently closing the door behind it.

And the fact that Unionist politicos discuss their future on here is because, over the water, they're not that interested, are they?
 

Scipio

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how do you mean? The OO is not a nationalist group. Patriotism and nationalism are not the same thing ;)
Ah, but is it? It is definitely dedicated to the idea of "British nationalism", of course that is often dressed up as overcoming "nationalism", when really it's nothing of the sort.

And of course, the OO has a strained history as regards national movements. Just look at what happened over the Act of Union in 1800.

Anyway the title of the article has it spot on - the key to a United Ireland is convincing enough Unionists to buy into it.

I'm not expecting another Volunteer Convention like in 1782 - but who knows what the future holds.
 

dazzler

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Yes he is right when he says that around 45% of unionists did not vote. However he neglected to mention that around 40% of nationalists did not vote either.

As for the Life and Times surveys. Not even worth the argument.
 

Estragon

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factual

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Good article by Pete Shirlow in todays Newsletter




Only unionists can create a united Ireland - Belfast Today

Under the G.F.A. it is for all of the people of the Six Counties to decide what their situation should be. It is however true that S.F. regard reaching out to unionists as important , and that is why S.F. have a Charter for Unionist Engagement. Gerry Adams has stated that this work is "among the most important work that SF are doing".

As stated in the charter, republicans recognise that we have a distance to travel in developing our understanding of unionsm.
 
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blinding

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Is this temporary separate Northern Ireland experiment really necessary anymore. How much difference is there between your average protestant/nationalist/catholic/unionist these days.

The one's that accentuate the differences have to work harder as times move forward.
 

Ó Ghabhainn

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Under the G.F.A. it is for all of the people of the Six Counties to decide what their situation should be. It is however true that S.F. regard reaching out to unionists as important , and that is why S.F. have a Charter for Unionist Engagement. Gerry Adams has stated that this work is "among the most important work that SF are doing".

As stated in the charter, republicans recognise that we have a distance to travel in developing our understanding of unionsm.
The problem with that is that perception comes into it. Unionists may not trust SF due to their past. I'm not speaking from my view here, but from the bigger picture.

What Schomberg fails to realise, or ignores, is that it does not necessarily take a minority or a majority from either side of the community - it takes a majority from the WHOLE community. That majority is not there, but will come as Nationalism increases.

Saying that "only unionists can create a united Ireland" is not compatible with an independent united Ireland and, in which case, is stating the obvious as only unionists would want to create a united Ireland within the UK. A unionist is not the foundation of your being, but it is your ideology with regards to the fate of NI. That ideology could change, in which case you'd no longer be unionist, and it would not be a unionist creating a united Ireland.
 

Schomberg

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SevenStars

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As stated in the charter, republicans recognise that we have a distance to travel in developing our understanding of unionsm.
You have a long distance to travel in understanding Unionism maybe....I dont. :D
 

Purplestar

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Under the G.F.A. it is for all of the people of the Six Counties to decide what their situation should be. It is however true that S.F. regard reaching out to unionists as important , and that is why S.F. have a Charter for Unionist Engagement. Gerry Adams has stated that this work is "among the most important work that SF are doing".

As stated in the charter, republicans recognise that we have a distance to travel in developing our understanding of unionsm.
Where is it he is reaching out to unionists. I want nothing to do with the shinners and I would say that the majority of unionists would say the same.
What has Gerry got to offer unionists that will make them forget the past 40 years and suddenly embrace republicanism.:rolleyes:
 

Cruimh

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How many people actually read and thought about the article ?
Not many by the sound of it.

If unionism is simply about stopping Sinn Fein then 2021 will be a year that is closer to Irish unifcation.

If it is about the idea of Northern Ireland as a positive place then unifcation will be put on hold.

Only unionists can, through their own negativity, create a united Ireland
 

PatsyDuffy LiamLynch

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The Good Friday Agreement and its signatories have ensured that the future of the people of Ireland is in the hands of a minority in the north east of the island. This is what the British sought from the agreement.
 


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