• Due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software, some users were "banned" when they tried to change their passwords at the end of February. This does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you were affected by this, please us viua the Contact us link in the footer.

Op Ed in Wall St Journal: decriminalise cannabis. Where's the liberal Irish Media?


cyberianpan

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 18, 2006
Messages
16,625
Website
www.google.com
For some reason some people seem to think the Irish Times is a liberal newspaper, I've no idea why. I find it very conservative, little mention of sex & timid on even alcohol let alone other drugs

The rest of the Irish news media is to my mind even more conservative , though Hotpress & others try to fill the gap.

The Wall St Journal, hardly a bastion of American liberalism, published an Op Ed arguing for the decriminalisation of cannabis:

The War on Drugs Is a Failure
We should focus instead on reducing harm to users and on tackling organized crime.

The war on drugs has failed. And it's high time to replace an ineffective strategy with more humane and efficient drug policies.

Prohibitionist policies based on eradication, interdiction and criminalization of consumption simply haven't worked.

Next, we must shatter the taboos that inhibit public debate about drugs in our societies. Antinarcotic policies are firmly rooted in prejudices and fears that sometimes bear little relation to reality.

We also propose the careful evaluation, from a public-health standpoint, of the possibility of decriminalizing the possession of cannabis for personal use....But the available empirical evidence shows that the hazards caused by cannabis are similar to the harm caused by alcohol or tobacco.


A growing number of political, civic and c...But to be effective, the new paradigm must focus on health and education -- not repression.

Mr. Cardoso is the former president of Brazil. Mr. Gaviria is a former president of Colombia. Mr. Zedillo is a former president of Mexico.
3 former heads of State in the WSJ - when do we get to have a national debate ?

cYp
 


JCSkinner

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2005
Messages
1,250
Website
skinflicks.blogspot.com
Fair play to the Wall Street Journal.
Although the UK Independent was ahead of the game on this some years ago, before rolling back under pressure from unsubstantiated, ill-informed 'drugs are baaaaaad, mmmkay?' morons like Halliwell, the dimwit copper former drugs 'czar'.
We badly need to pursue these sort of policies here. Our prohibition laws have fuelled serious social problems caused by the criminalisation of heroin addicts, gangland involvement in cocaine and heroin trafficking and driving people to massively excessive alcohol abuse.
One also notes that the harm assessment by the medical journal The Lancet of various drugs found cannabis, ecstasy and LSD to be significantly lower than either alcohol or tobacco. Go figure.
Plus, decriminalisation, if not actual overt legalisation, would be good for the taxpayer too:
Skin Flicks: Time to free the weed?
 

Bobert

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,072
If only there was a liberal Irish forum who could hold this debate...
 

Bobert

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,072
I wasn't talking about p.ie. I meant one that engages face to face.
 

PhoenixIreland

Active member
Joined
Oct 5, 2008
Messages
260
Website
www.huffingtonpost.com
dudes...wheres my car?
 

JCSkinner

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2005
Messages
1,250
Website
skinflicks.blogspot.com
Indeed , p.ie is pretty potty

My point is the Irish mainstream media is not

cYp
I'd suggest the opposite.
But I get your pun.
What we need here in Ireland are firstly advocates for the anti-prohibition stance. In a recent communication I had with Mr Kushlick of Transform in Britain, I noted that apart from Ming Flanagan there is no voice for the anti-prohibition side of the argument.
We don't have the medics reporting on the real harm attributes like they do in Britain.
If we had these, then the media would have people to call up and give air time and column inches to, instead of ringing that dingbat Grainne Kenny all the time.
 
Last edited:

Bobert

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,072
The problem with advocates against prohibition (how else can I phrase that) is that they are seldom competent.
 

JCSkinner

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2005
Messages
1,250
Website
skinflicks.blogspot.com
The problem with advocates against prohibition (how else can I phrase that) is that they are seldom competent.
Are you speaking in terms of Ireland or more generally?
I don't think anyone could query the credentials of The Lancet article's authors, and Danny Kushlick is an admirable advocate and estimable debater on the issue.
And even in Ireland, Flanagan tends to wipe the floor with any prohibitionist foolish enough to debate with him.
 

Bobert

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,072
General. Let's face it, they're not the most professional looking bunch.
 

H.R. Haldeman

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
4,444
I'd prefer the Man to stay away from my bong thank you very much.

But I'd "legalise" heroin tomorrow morning (as in, provide it free to addicts through state-run clinics).
 

Bobert

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,072
These people for one...
 

JCSkinner

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2005
Messages
1,250
Website
skinflicks.blogspot.com
These people for one...
What about these people, then?
Drug Policy Action Group

Like I said, there is no coherent anti-prohibition advocacy movement in Ireland. The people you linked to are a Bebo-based group of pot smokers who have a smoke-in every year on the 20th of April, as part of the worldwide 420 movement. Their position is solely one of freedom to smoke. They're not in the business of arguing the point coherently as part of a wider strategy to tackle social ills, harm reduction, the hypocrisy of our current laws or anything else.
Drug Policy did do that, and indeed issued a series of highly relevant documents on the issues, largely into a vacuum of silence.
They've since wound their activities down somewhat, because in this country only bankers and developers gain the ear of legislators, apparently.
I'd be keen to see them become more active again, as there does need to be a kernel of gravity around which to build public opinion.
 

Bobert

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,072
DPAG don't have poto's on their site and haven't done anything since mid-07...

I'm sure though that they were very competent but this country isn't ready for legalisation yet. Maybe in fifty years, sure.
 

JCSkinner

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2005
Messages
1,250
Website
skinflicks.blogspot.com
DPAG don't have poto's on their site and haven't done anything since mid-07...

I'm sure though that they were very competent but this country isn't ready for legalisation yet. Maybe in fifty years, sure.
Like I said, they ceased to be active when it became clear that they were presenting valuable information to the state which was being utterly ignored. Yet most of their documents remain highly relevant to this day.
This country is not only ready for legalisation, or an interim position of decriminalisation and licensing of some substances alongside state-monitored legalisation of others (like the heroin proposal above), but it badly needs to implement it.
We can't wait 50 years, and we won't wait 50 years. Europe is moving well away from prohibition, and we can either design a couture solution that works for us in Ireland or end up inheriting whatever the Brits choose to do at a later date.
 

Bobert

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,072
I agree with you, but it won't be any sooner.
 

JCSkinner

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2005
Messages
1,250
Website
skinflicks.blogspot.com
I agree with you, but it won't be any sooner.
Sure it will. Like I said, we'll be railroaded into it on terms other than our own if we don't come up with some ideas of our own.
I reckon we'll see cannabis treated akin to tobacco within a decade, and a major set of restrictions on ancillary alcohol issues (like advertising, sponsorship, and access) and some form of heroin provision for addicts in a similar time period.
 

Bobert

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,072
No, it won't.


And just to set the record straight, I do not use any drugs.
 

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top