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Orange lodge to mark 1916 Easter Rising

Irish-Rationalist

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An Orange lodge will take part in an event to commemorate the 1916 Easter Rising in County Cavan on Saturday.
The meeting of minds and music will be led by traditional Irish musician, Martin Donohue, and his friend Jim Mills, secretary of the Orange Order in Mullaghboy.

The two men have forged a partnership which looks past their cultural differences. Together with their bands, they will remember the Easter Rising.

Speaking on the BBC's Evening Extra programme, Mr Mills said it was important for Protestants to take part in the commemoration event because "it wasn't just Catholics who were involved in the rising."

He said it was "only right and proper" that the lodge celebrated "along with everyone else". Mr Donohue and Mr Mills have been making music together since they first made contact through a cross-community fund in 2010.

"It's always a positive thing when we get together to make music", Mr Donohue told the BBC.

Orange lodge to mark 1916 Easter Rising in Cavan commemoration - BBC News

Certainly music to my ears.

Why can't the Orange Order in the north of Ireland do this?
 


APettigrew92

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Why can't the Orange Order in the north of Ireland do this?
The Protestant folk of Cavan were famously sold out by the Unionists around 100 years back. Cavan had a large Protestant population at the time and probably was a more feasible addition that the likes of Tyrone and Derry.

Edward Saunderson, founder of the Ulster Unionist Council, was born in the County. However, when the Irish Unionist Party met on 9 June 1916, the delegates from Cavan learnt that they would not be included in any "temporary exclusion of Ulster" from Home Rule; they agreed only with very great reluctance
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_Cavan#History

Perhaps their Orange Order adopted a more convenient disposition than their "besieged" brethren up North.
 

between the bridges

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The Protestant folk of Cavan were famously sold out by the Unionists around 100 years back. Cavan had a large Protestant population at the time and probably was a more feasible addition that the likes of Tyrone and Derry.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_Cavan#History

Perhaps their Orange Order adopted a more convenient disposition than their "besieged" brethren up North.
We may have given up 3 counties from the 1913 proclamation but ye big girls blouses gave up 6 from the 1916 proclamation, beatch slapped wimps that ye are...
 

Dimples 77

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An Orange lodge will take part in an event to commemorate the 1916 Easter Rising in County Cavan on Saturday.
The meeting of minds and music will be led by traditional Irish musician, Martin Donohue, and his friend Jim Mills, secretary of the Orange Order in Mullaghboy.

The two men have forged a partnership which looks past their cultural differences. Together with their bands, they will remember the Easter Rising.

Speaking on the BBC's Evening Extra programme, Mr Mills said it was important for Protestants to take part in the commemoration event because "it wasn't just Catholics who were involved in the rising."

He said it was "only right and proper" that the lodge celebrated "along with everyone else". Mr Donohue and Mr Mills have been making music together since they first made contact through a cross-community fund in 2010.

"It's always a positive thing when we get together to make music", Mr Donohue told the BBC.

Orange lodge to mark 1916 Easter Rising in Cavan commemoration - BBC News

Certainly music to my ears.

Why can't the Orange Order in the north of Ireland do this?
What's the obsession with Donegal?

Isn't Cavan far enough north for you?
 

Hibee

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We got Cavan's financial management skills , monaghan's literature and Donegal's scenery and fishing.

Ye got declining industry , Portadown , bad beer .
 
T

thewanderer



An Orange lodge will take part in an event to commemorate the 1916 Easter Rising in County Cavan on Saturday.
The meeting of minds and music will be led by traditional Irish musician, Martin Donohue, and his friend Jim Mills, secretary of the Orange Order in Mullaghboy.

The two men have forged a partnership which looks past their cultural differences. Together with their bands, they will remember the Easter Rising.

Speaking on the BBC's Evening Extra programme, Mr Mills said it was important for Protestants to take part in the commemoration event because "it wasn't just Catholics who were involved in the rising."

He said it was "only right and proper" that the lodge celebrated "along with everyone else". Mr Donohue and Mr Mills have been making music together since they first made contact through a cross-community fund in 2010.

"It's always a positive thing when we get together to make music", Mr Donohue told the BBC.

Orange lodge to mark 1916 Easter Rising in Cavan commemoration - BBC News

Certainly music to my ears.

Why can't the Orange Order in the north of Ireland do this?
Well that's some unanticipated positivity
 

Dimples 77

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Well that's some unanticipated positivity
I don't agree that there is anything positive about this opinion:

"Mr Mills said it was important for Protestants to take part in the commemoration event because "it wasn't just Catholics who were involved in the rising".

Since the 1916 Rising was a political act, and not a religious one, I really don't see why Protestants as a group should take part in commemorations.

Protestants who agree with the political aims of the 1916 Risers are free to participate on their own, or in groups, as they see fit.

Are we now saying that all Catholics should be expected to commemorate in the events that led to the establishment of Northern Ireland, on the basis that some Catholics were involved in that? Will some GAA club or unit of Hibernians be doing so when the 100th anniversary of the establishment of NI is commemorated? I very much doubt it.
 

michael-mcivor

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We may have given up 3 counties from the 1913 proclamation but ye big girls blouses gave up 6 from the 1916 proclamation, beatch slapped wimps that ye are...
The vote for the All-Ireland when it happens could see a 32 Republic- No Unionist ever wanted a deal to get 3 counties back- we slap faces and shake hands and make deals at the same time-
 

Dearghoul

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I don't agree that there is anything positive about this opinion:

"Mr Mills said it was important for Protestants to take part in the commemoration event because "it wasn't just Catholics who were involved in the rising".

Since the 1916 Rising was a political act, and not a religious one, I really don't see why Protestants as a group should take part in commemorations.

Protestants who agree with the political aims of the 1916 Risers are free to participate on their own, or in groups, as they see fit.

Are we now saying that all Catholics should be expected to commemorate in the events that led to the establishment of Northern Ireland, on the basis that some Catholics were involved in that? Will some GAA club or unit of Hibernians be doing so when the 100th anniversary of the establishment of NI is commemorated? I very much doubt it.
Ach he meant well. Awaw with your nitpicking. BTW you've one too many words in your post. It's the 'in' in the last paragraph.
 

Dame_Enda

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Its not possible to be very segregated when you're 5% of the population as the Protestants are in Cavan. The further away you get from Belfast the more moderate Unionism becomes.
 

toconn

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Good for them ! Can't be a bad thing can it , a few tunes and a smile ? This country needs to lighten up sometimes.
 

Truth.ie

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Its not possible to be very segregated when you're 5% of the population as the Protestants are in Cavan. The further away you get from Belfast the more moderate Unionism becomes.

The whole Prod/Catholic things seems so obsolete and daft now in this age of the Islamist threat and Daesh etc.
 
Last edited:

Karloff

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The whole Prod/Catholic things seems so obsolete and daft now in this age of the Islamist threat and Daesh etc.
Don't be too sure.

In fifty years time in NI there will probably be Protestant Muslims and Catholic Muslims....
 

Levellers

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Proof that unlike the sectarian bigotry of NI soccer the GAA is all inclusive.

 

Irish-Rationalist

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I don't agree that there is anything positive about this opinion:

"Mr Mills said it was important for Protestants to take part in the commemoration event because "it wasn't just Catholics who were involved in the rising".

Since the 1916 Rising was a political act, and not a religious one, I really don't see why Protestants as a group should take part in commemorations.

Protestants who agree with the political aims of the 1916 Risers are free to participate on their own, or in groups, as they see fit.

Are we now saying that all Catholics should be expected to commemorate in the events that led to the establishment of Northern Ireland, on the basis that some Catholics were involved in that? Will some GAA club or unit of Hibernians be doing so when the 100th anniversary of the establishment of NI is commemorated? I very much doubt it.
You're typically conflating religion with politics in an attempt to obfuscate. It's important to separate the two out. There are Catholic Unionists and Protestant Republicans. The Orange in the RoI is composed of Irishmen of British descent, who by and large after almost a century, accept the legitimacy of the state in which they live. They may have some residual attachment to their country of origin, but their loyalty in the 21st century is to Ireland, not GB. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Unlike the OO in the six, the Cavan OO are perhaps more accepting of Irish political events, and are more prepared to recognise the role that Protestants of British descent played in the fight for Irish independence. No-one expects Northern Catholic's or affiliated organisations (Hibernians) to participate in celebration's pertaining to the undemocratic partition of the island, nor the establishment of a state which was brought into existence on the basis of a sectarian head-count, and in which they were subjected to a program of discrimination and exclusion.
 

GDPR

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Don't be too sure.

In fifty years time in NI there will probably be Protestant Muslims and Catholic Muslims....
I really love the Coptic people and in general they are very gentle industrious types BUT somehow two Copt brothers ended up in the UDA and they were out and out scumbags. There has been a Chinese population in NI for ages of ages but none of them seem to have got involved in politics or fighting outside of Anna Lo who is on the pale green wing of the Alliance Party.
 

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