Orange Order Goes Soft On Mass

Irish-Rationalist

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The Assistant Grand Master of the Orange Order has said he would support the lifting of a ban on members attending Catholic church services.

The historic rule stops members going to the funerals and weddings of Catholic friends.

The Reverend Mervyn Gibson told the BBC's Talkback programme he would support a move to lift the ban on entering Catholic churches.

He said the rule "harked back to a different era".
Orange Order in Mass U-turn call - BBC News

Orange Order - fenian loving batsards.
 


former wesleyan

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Next up, line dancing ban lifted.
 

Irish-Rationalist

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Next up, line dancing ban lifted.
With many OO chappies being of the rural, thick as pig-sh1t, country yokel variety, I would have imagined line-dancing would have been compulsory.
 

Strawberry

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They already whip each other and ride goats, they'll feel right at home at Mass.
 

McSlaggart

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With many OO chappies being of the rural, thick as pig-sh1t, country yokel variety, I would have imagined line-dancing would have been compulsory.
Normally rural people are better educated than those who live in more populated areas.
 

Irish-Rationalist

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Normally rural people are better educated than those who live in more populated areas.
And of course you can substantiate your assertion with quantifiable data.
 

McSlaggart

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vinoboy

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I hope when BtB reads the OP he will have his specs on and not think it reads :

OO goes soft en masse !

Mind you after getting to march up the Crumlin Road everybody is a bit deflated at the anti climax . :D
 

belfast1981

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I've always thought this rule needed changed.

There are many examples of times Protestants can have to go to a Catholic Mass service. Funerals, Weddings, confirmations, christenings etc.

If they are still set on having a rule, allow attendance but ask for non participation in catholic service events like communion or lighting of the candles etc.

I have done this on countless occasions. Attended funeral masses etc but did not participate in communion etc (Forgive me if I am mistaken, but that is when the Priest offers the wafer during the service, isn't it?)

After all, it is still a christian service and there is very little difference between churches when it comes to the word of god.
 

Irish-Rationalist

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Looking at raw attainment scores, pupils living in rural areas tend to have higher secondary school attainment than those living in urban areas, suggesting that there may be intrinsic benefits of living in rural areas for young people.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/educational-attainment-in-rural-areas
You conveniently omitted the second part of the paragraph which went on to state ..."However, there is widespread regional variation in rural attainment and pupils living in some affluent rural areas do not have the high attainment that would be expected."

Perhaps they're the pupils that go on to join the Ornj?
 

CastleRay

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I've always thought this rule needed changed.

There are many examples of times Protestants can have to go to a Catholic Mass service. Funerals, Weddings, confirmations, christenings etc.

If they are still set on having a rule, allow attendance but ask for non participation in catholic service events like communion or lighting of the candles etc.

I have done this on countless occasions. Attended funeral masses etc but did not participate in communion etc (Forgive me if I am mistaken, but that is when the Priest offers the wafer during the service, isn't it?)

After all, it is still a christian service and there is very little difference between churches when it comes to the word of god.
Afaik some OO members attend RC funerals but leave at the communion bit. The few orangemen I know (rural members) attend funerals and weddings and stay throughout the service and don't view the rule as practical.
 

Irish-Rationalist

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I hope when BtB reads the OP he will have his specs on and not think it reads :

OO goes soft en masse !

Mind you after getting to march up the Crumlin Road everybody is a bit deflated at the anti climax . :D
The end of the Twaddle pish camp is the end of a cultural era. The cultured people of Ardoyne are now faced with a future devoid of nightly PUL cultural activities, which brought an atmosphere of blood and thunder to the area. Perhaps someone shall come up with something to fill the cultural void? Like Morris dancing?
 

Irish-Rationalist

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I've always thought this rule needed changed.

There are many examples of times Protestants can have to go to a Catholic Mass service. Funerals, Weddings, confirmations, christenings etc.

If they are still set on having a rule, allow attendance but ask for non participation in catholic service events like communion or lighting of the candles etc.

I have done this on countless occasions. Attended funeral masses etc but did not participate in communion etc (Forgive me if I am mistaken, but that is when the Priest offers the wafer during the service, isn't it?)

After all, it is still a christian service and there is very little difference between churches when it comes to the word of god.
Apparently some priests offer more than wafers, but that's an ecumenical matter. Say no more.

Personally, I'm shocked and horrified that a young Protestant man would subject himself to the evils of Romanish papacy. When attending these funeral masses etc., I trust you carried at lest one concealed clove of garlic? You can never be too careful ..
 

mac tíre

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With many OO chappies being of the rural, thick as pig-sh1t, country yokel variety, I would have imagined line-dancing would have been compulsory.
You know nothing, boyo.

Hoist by your own petard.
 

hollandia

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Afaik some OO members attend RC funerals but leave at the communion bit. The few orangemen I know (rural members) attend funerals and weddings and stay throughout the service and don't view the rule as practical.
Probably more to do with the interdependency of rural farming practices, than any idealogical reasons. Rural communities tend to be more close knit.
 

DT123

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Most would have attended whatever service they needed to go to and just not take communion. The end.

Apart from wondering WTF. at the shaking hands but.
 

hollandia

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Most would have attended whatever service they needed to go to and just not take communion. The end.

Apart from wondering WTF. at the shaking hands but.
It's not at the end, and I'm also pretty sure that Anglicans do that too. Unless you're talking about funerals specifically where you shake the hands of the family of the deceased, which is custom and not part of the mass or funeral rite.
 

DT123

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It's not at the end, and I'm also pretty sure that Anglicans do that too. Unless you're talking about funerals specifically where you shake the hands of the family of the deceased, which is custom and not part of the mass or funeral rite.
Every Catholic service I have ever been to involved hand shaking at some point.

If you mean CoI by Anglican, they don't shake hands.
 


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