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Origins of Sectarian Insults


Northern Voice

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I hope people can remain civil in this thread. I'm interested in the origins of certain terms used to insult either community in Northern Ireland. Most of us know where the likes of 'fenian' comes from (19th C. Irish revolutionaries) as well as 'hun' (Queen's German ancestry). A couple I am not sure of, however, are 'black b*****d' and 'taig'? Maybe somebody could enlighten me. No childish nonsense, please. Plenty of other threads for that.
 


DeputyEdo

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Taig:
Taig - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


had a neighbour who used to call everything that was annoying her a "black bastard"....if the car wouldn't start it was called it, if the kids mis-behaved they were called it.
One day, he bath sprung a leak, so she called it "A black enamel bastard"........so funny I still use it.
 

Simply

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Not sure about 'hun'.Thought it related to the Celtic/Rangers rivalry and originated from a English newspaper's description of the behaviour of travelling Rangers fans.More recently it has been borrowed and used as an overtly sectarian label
 
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SideysGhost

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I always thought "black bastard" referred to the Black Preceptory, as they were seen as the social elite within Unionism - big farmers and landowners, minor gentry, businessmen, retired army officers and so on (dunno if this still holds) and therefore the people who really pulled the strings under the Old Stormont regime.

You can to some extent excuse some knuckle-dragger uneducated Loyalist from some ghetto on the grounds they don't know any better, but wealthy educated people are supposed to know better, so when they go out of their way to design and prop up a corrupt discriminatory regime, they really are bastards.
 

Simply

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Always liked the subtle distinction contained in Brendan Behan's 'horse Protestant'.
 

Cruimh

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I always thought "black bastard" referred to the Black Preceptory, as they were seen as the social elite within Unionism - big farmers and landowners, minor gentry, businessmen, retired army officers and so on (dunno if this still holds) and therefore the people who really pulled the strings under the Old Stormont regime.

You can to some extent excuse some knuckle-dragger uneducated Loyalist from some ghetto on the grounds they don't know any better, but wealthy educated people are supposed to know better, so when they go out of their way to design and prop up a corrupt discriminatory regime, they really are bastards.
Black is widely used in a pejorative sense - and collectively for the North to include both protestants and RCs.
 

eoghanacht

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Jaffa is another.
 

Verhofstadt

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What's with 'Tim' Its not that popular as a name among Catholics.
Only in Glasgow.. filtering out via the Old Firm.. Tim Malloys / Timalloy were a catholic street gang in Calton district of Glasgow between the World wars.
 

former wesleyan

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Black is widely used in a pejorative sense - and collectively for the North to include both protestants and RCs.
But " black enameled bastards " was reserved for the exclusive use as a insult against the RUC and was cross community . petunia
 

SideysGhost

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Black is widely used in a pejorative sense - and collectively for the North to include both protestants and RCs.
Ah, the southern use of "Black Nordie Bastard", I well remember getting random loons muttering that at me whenever I opened my mouth in Dublin in the late 80s/early 90s.

But was that in itself a derivative of Black Bastard as applied to Huns? From back in the days pre-69 when the south was busy trying to pretend northern nationalists didn't even exist and "North" was synonymous for "Orange".

I've no idea, be interesting to find out though!
 

SideysGhost

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Only in Glasgow.. filtering out via the Old Firm.. Tim Malloys / Timalloy were a catholic street gang in Calton district of Glasgow between the World wars.
I've always wondered about that one, cheers!

"Singing I'm no Billy I'm a Tim" etc.
 

YoungLiberal

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Not sure about 'hun'.Thought it related to the Celtic/Rangers rivalry and originated from a English newspaper's description of the behaviour of travelling Rangers fans.More recently it has been borrowed and used as an overtly sectarian label
Yeah, I believe Rangers traveled down to Newcastle in the late 60s, early 70s anyway, troubled ensued and one of the local papers said that the rangers fans came "across the border like marauding huns". Then it stuck.

In Scotland, at least, although the courts have decided that it is, it's hard to see how it is strictly sectarian. Almost all the other clubs in the SPL (bar Hearts, who have attained the label of "mini-huns") will sing "Go home, ya Huns, go home, ya huns, Go home, ya huns, go home" when Rangers fans are leaving a stadium after a loss.
 

Cruimh

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Taig is also interesting - is it from the saying linked to first name as claimed in Wikipedia or the surname -
of which there are several variants

John Montague - in one of his best poems, The Rough Field -

Falls or Shankhill
Lecky or Fountain
love's allweyway
message scrawled
Popehead: Tague
my own name
hatred's synonym
 

eoghanacht

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Taig is also interesting - is it from the saying linked to first name as claimed in Wikipedia or the surname -
of which there are several variants

John Montague - in one of his best poems, The Rough Field -

Falls or Shankhill
Lecky or Fountain
love's allweyway
message scrawled
Popehead: Tague
my own name
hatred's synonym
I believe it does come from the name tadgh, it was a popular name amongst the irish until patrick replaced it in the mid 19th century
 

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