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Over 40% of charities pay chiefs more than €100,000


sheehan

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Jun 21, 2010
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http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2012/1219/breaking4.html

How come so many "charities" can afford paying their top guys so much while refusing to adopt total transparency in terms of financial reporting? Even the publicly traded commercial organisations are required to publish their top executives' remuneration, while these "noble" people choose to do otherwise.

What about other "charities" organisations that take money/donation regularly from the public for some usually "noble causes"?
 


b.a. baracus

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Feb 3, 2009
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It is wrong that charity chiefs are paid so much but in many cases these charities appear to have migrated from their presumably noble beginnings to becoming empire building businesses.

Why are there so many charities competing in the same area ostensibly trying to help the same people? Each of these needs a CEO, admin staff, budget for rent etc before they even think about getting cash to those who need it.

I hear the homeless charities on the radio this morning. Somebody should ask Simon how many CEO's they have and how much they are paid (Yes they have more than one, that is not a misprint). While they are at it they should ask them why themselves, Focus and Cope have been involved in tendering to run specific services. Charities competing against each other...who would have thought it.
 

The Field Marshal

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Well done to the OP for raising public awareness in relation to the sewer of financial corruption that permeates many Irish based so called NGO, s and charitable FO organisations.
 
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potholedogger

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The Charity sector turns over more than 4 billion each year. Many Charities are essentially covering the same ground with a great deal of duplication of administration.

Many Charities are essentially acting as agents of the State.

Time for a major rationalisation.
 

culmore

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time for charity to begin at home, scrap all oversea aid till our own situation is better , and get rid of all these CEOs total waste of money
 

de knowledge economy

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The Charity sector turns over more than 4 billion each year. Many Charities are essentially covering the same ground with a great deal of duplication of administration.

Many Charities are essentially acting as agents of the State.

Time for a major rationalisation.
As well as a chief there will be a 'head of advocacy' etc etc
 

Beaker

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I have no problem with NGO senior staff getting appropriatly paid. If they have an MBA, max 5yr contract, with performance & growth of revenue targets etc, then thats fair enough. However, if they want the big bucks, then they need to perform at the appropriatly high level.....
 

potholedogger

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momentimori

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Charity admin costs are terrible too.

Take a look at these figures for Australia.



UK ones aren't much better either.
 

goosebump

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I have no problem with NGO senior staff getting appropriatly paid. If they have an MBA, max 5yr contract, with performance & growth of revenue targets etc, then thats fair enough. However, if they want the big bucks, then they need to perform at the appropriatly high level.....
Running a charity requires a huge amount of skill and experience, which is directly relates to what a specific charity raises in a given year.

The muppet chorus on this site seems to think that organising large body of people to undertaken a specific task is something that any Joe Public plucked off the street would be willing and capable to do for €30k.
 

potholedogger

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Running a charity requires a huge amount of skill and experience, which is directly relates to what a specific charity raises in a given year.

The muppet chorus on this site seems to think that organising large body of people to undertaken a specific task is something that any Joe Public plucked off the street would be willing and capable to do for €30k.
Charities should be required to detail the percentage of their turnover that they spend on administration and fundraising anywhere their name is printed.
 

Levellers

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When I lived in England I dated a girl who worked in one of the well-known charities. What she told me ensured that I never again gave anything to a charity [except the Irish Cancer Society].
 

Howya

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The report states that there are over 8,000 non-profit organisations. Many schools claim charitable status - be good to see detailed stats on sectors, employee numbers etc.

I would advocate not supporting any charity that refuses to be fully transparent in its annual accounts. If the charity is being run well (i.e. low cost ratio), then no issue with salaries.
 

General Urko

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I'm surprised it's as low as 40%. A lot also got plumb jobs for their relatives in the same organisation. BTW how much is Angela Kearns, CEO Rehab and many other jobs getting?
 

Howya

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When I lived in England I dated a girl who worked in one of the well-known charities. What she told me ensured that I never again gave anything to a charity [except the Irish Cancer Society].
Was she dating you out of charity?petunia
 

The Field Marshal

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Running a charity requires a huge amount of skill and experience, which is directly relates to what a specific charity raises in a given year.

The muppet chorus on this site seems to think that organising large body of people to undertaken a specific task is something that any Joe Public plucked off the street would be willing and capable to do for €30k.
The op refers to CEOs of the many relatively small scale charities in Ireland receiving excessive remuneration and failing to be transparent and accountable wrt public taxpayers money they receive . There is an onus on every charity to be seen to conduct its affairs in a modest, transparent and non partisan/ political manner. The majority of Ireland's better known charities acting abroad fail this test .
 

Spanner Island

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It's the poverty industry which is there 'to protect the most vulnerable' don't you know?

Lot's of genuine people and goodwill I'm sure...

But there's also a lot of crooks and self serving parasites too... as there are in all walks of life...

In a way it's become like the 'War on Drugs'... something which started out with good intentions but which has morphed into a monster that is stuffed to the gills with people and vested interests who rely on it for their livelihoods...
 

daveL

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Oct 29, 2010
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Not expecting financial transparency in terms of salaries and expenses from organisations solely in existence because of donations and grants is staggeringly mindboggling.

Typically Irish.

An open door for misappropriation and favours.
 

Twin Towers

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Oct 14, 2005
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Free money is always a magnet for those intent on getting their hands in the cookie jar. From the street collector through to the CEO.
 

ednw1

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Nov 9, 2012
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The highest-paid chief executive of the 32 charities that supplied information to the newspaper was at Enable Ireland – with a salary of €156,241 per year.

The charity said its chief executive had never availed of the 10 per cent bonus available to all senior public sector grades; had waived a pay increase of 2.5 per cent in 2008; and took a pay reduction to bring the salary in line with the public service cut of 12 per cent.

why are they anything to do with public sector grades (ie they are a private fund raising organanisation -albeit under charity status)
 

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