• It has come to our attention that some users may have been "banned" when they tried to change their passwords after the site was hacked due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software. This would have occurred around the end of February and does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you believe you were affected by this, please contact a staff member or use the Contact us link at the bottom of any forum page.

[P.ie Survey] Over 88% of Politics.ie Readers are aged 25 or over


Joined
Feb 21, 2003
Messages
4,265
Website
www.politics.ie
Twitter
davidcochrane
This is the second in a series of posts to review and discuss the results of the recent Politics.ie Survey.

The first survey on gender is here.

We conducted a poll on Politics.ie recently for various reasons, firstly we wanted to know who you were, in terms of demographic information. We wanted to look at areas for growth of the site, where (and who) to target. Seeing where we have bigger audiences also helps us target advertising, the primary means of funding the activities of Politics.ie (we hope!).

The survey was conducted using the audience of Politics.ie, we did not seek to segment based on reader or poster. About 3,000 people login to comment every day, it's a sixth (sometimes a tenth!) of the total audience that visits Politics.ie every day. Almost 1,300 people responded in the end, which we exceptionally thankful for, it helps make the data more statistically significant.

The survey results themselves are amazing, we'll be sharing the results over the coming days. The reason we're drip-feeding them like this is that we'd like your insights into the results of specific questions.


Age Range

11.2% of Politics.ie Readers are aged under 25. 30% of Politics.ie readers are aged between 25 and 34, 42.5% are aged between 35 and 49. and 14.5% are aged between 50 and 65.

I'm very surprised with the age range of Politics.ie, in a survey of Politics.ie members in 2005 (five years ago!) 20% of readers said they were 24 of under - that's almost halved. The 25+ age group has stayed pretty steady, whereas the number of older people visiting Politics.ie has increased massively. In 2005, the % of users over the age of 35 on Politics.ie was 36.6%, today it's 58.8%.

Age Range (2010)

Code:
< 18    1.30%
18-24   9.90%
25-34   30.00%
35-49   42.50%
50-65   14.50%
>65     1.80%
Age Range (2005)

Code:
15-19   9.70%
20-24   20.60%
25-34   33.10%
35-44   19.70%
45-54   10.30%
55-64   3.70%
65+     2.90%
 
Last edited:

factual

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 5, 2005
Messages
8,761
Interesting - perhaps reflects the changing use of the internet over time as younger people move to the newer fechnologies of Twitter and Facebook and more elderly people stick to the older format of discussion forums (which have been around since the start of the internet).
 

Dev__

Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
31
I'm astonished at how old everyone here is. I would have expected the discussion here to be a lot more civilized given this information.

Twitter users are more likely to be older. I'm not sure about facebook.
 
Last edited:

YoungLiberal

Well-known member
Joined
May 10, 2009
Messages
2,052
Interesting to see that those who were under 19 in 2005 have got older (As you would expect) and have been replaced by nobody...

All in all, that's a good spread for the site.
 
Joined
Feb 21, 2003
Messages
4,265
Website
www.politics.ie
Twitter
davidcochrane
I also think it's a reflection of how P.ie has moved as a niche website to become a proper meeja outlet.

In 2005 Politics.ie had 1500 visitors a day, today that's about 18,000.
 

YoungLiberal

Well-known member
Joined
May 10, 2009
Messages
2,052
I also think it's a reflection of how P.ie has moved as a niche website to become a proper meeja outlet.

In 2005 Politics.ie had 1500 visitors a day, today that's about 18,000.
Wasn't aware the growth had been that massive since then. Congrats.
 

davehiggz

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2009
Messages
1,116
Well if no one else my age (18) wants to be involved in politics then I guess I shouldn't have a problem gaining a Dáil seat in a decade or two :D


But on a more serious note, I am surprised. I thought this recession would have sparked more young minds into politics and onto this website. If there's not a large generation of people coming down the line who care about politics then we may have some problems ahead.
 

factual

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 5, 2005
Messages
8,761
I have a new theory.

Back in 2005, older people in their 40s did not tend to use the internet as much -- at work and at home -- as they do today. That was somethign students did. Between 2005 and 2010 there was a big growth of broadband and the 40+ online browsing community greatly expanded. So the absolute numbers of young people on the site has not fallen the relative number has.
 

YoungLiberal

Well-known member
Joined
May 10, 2009
Messages
2,052
I have a new theory.

Back in 2005, older people in their 40s did not tend to use the internet much at work and at home. That was somethign students did. Between 2005 and 2010 there was a big growth of broadband and the 40+ online community greatly expanded. So the absolute numbers of young people on the site has not fallen the relative number has.
Yup, that's pretty credible.
 

Cruimh

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 30, 2010
Messages
85,704
I also think it's a reflection of how P.ie has moved as a niche website to become a proper meeja outlet.

In 2005 Politics.ie had 1500 visitors a day, today that's about 18,000.
Those figures suggest that some people stay here for years - I wonder how many of the 15-19 group 2005 are now sitting in the 2010 18-24 group -
either with the same SN or a new one ?
 

sondagefaux

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
15,682
Interesting - perhaps reflects the changing use of the internet over time as younger people move to the newer fechnologies of Twitter and Facebook and more elderly people stick to the older format of discussion forums (which have been around since the start of the internet).
I doubt it. It seems that people have stuck with politics.ie as they've got older.

About 40% in the 18-34 age groups, with a broadly similar percentage (42.5%) in the 35-49 age range.

That compares to about 25-28% in the 18-34 age groups nationally, and 21% in the 35-49 age groups nationally (2006 figures)

(http://www.hse.ie/images_upload/portal/eng/HSE_FactFile/Health_Status_Reports/Dublin_Health_Status_Report/Age_Groups/Dublin.JPG)

In other words, both age groups are very over-represented as readers/users of politics.ie.

I thought that the younger (less than 34) age groups would represent at least 50% but apart from that the results aren't too surprising.

The number of people under 18 who are interested in politics and who use forums is derisory, while the number of older people who use the internet is clearly lower than the 18-50 age groups.

All in all, I'd say the politics.ie figures are fairly representative for overall internet usage in Ireland.

According to the figures, over 80% of people aged between 16 and 34 use the internet regularly (83.2% of those aged 16-24; 87.4% of those aged 25-34; 76.1% of those aged 35-44).

Age is no longer the barrier it used to be, or was perceived to be, to using the Internet. The notion that the Internet is only relevant to younger people is dispelled by the latest data from the Central Statistics Office.

True, those between 16 and 34 show the highest Internet use rates, in excess of 80%. However, there is growing use among older people who are becoming increasingly Internet savvy. Some 235,000 of Irish people aged over 55 are now online. The biggest increase is shown among those between 55 and 64 – rising from 33.9% usage to 41.7% between 2007 and 2008. Among 65 to 74-year-olds, the rate of growth is slower but usage rates now stand at a respectable 21.5%.
Irish Internet Association : State of the Net (see no. 14, graphs by Internet strategy, online strategy by AMAS online consultancy Ireland)
 

factual

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 5, 2005
Messages
8,761
Those figures suggest that people stay here for years - I wonder how many of the 15-19 group 2005 are now sitting in the 2010 18-24 group - either with the same SN or a new one ?
Speaking as one of the long-standing contributors a lot have left - smiffy and DOD (who were welcoming to me when I arrived) spring to mind. Others have stayed like rockofcashel (another really nice guy). People like sidewinder have come back under a new name (sidey's ghost) though he is in the older bracket (but full of wisdom and called the credit crunch wel before anyone else). I would say that there is a lot of turnover and people do come on and leave after a while. I would guesstimate that only perhaps 20% of people have stayed to continue posting through that time continuously.

Another change is that P.ie is actually so big now that its difficult to get to know people unless they contribute very frequently.
 

Twin Towers

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 14, 2005
Messages
5,885
Age Range (2010)

Code:
< 18    1.30%
18-24   9.90%
25-34   30.00%
35-49   42.50%
50-65   14.50%
>65     1.80%
Age Range (2005)

Code:
15-19   9.70%
20-24   20.60%
25-34   33.10%
35-44   19.70%
45-54   10.30%
55-64   3.70%
65+     2.90%
Also you are not comparing like with like. The age spreads in the two samples are different and there are 6 groups in the first and 7 in the second.
 

CookieMonster

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 19, 2005
Messages
34,801
I also think it's a reflection of how P.ie has moved as a niche website to become a proper meeja outlet.

In 2005 Politics.ie had 1500 visitors a day, today that's about 18,000.
I think it's important to note that I joined P.ie in 2005. My presence and contributions obviously have had a very positive impact on the site.
 

factual

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 5, 2005
Messages
8,761
I think it's important to note that I joined P.ie in 2005. My presence and contributions obviously have had a very positive impact on the site.
CookieMonster its interesting we joined at the same time. So I believe the same may be deduced for me. Though is is fair to say you made a larger contribution measured in terms of sheer number of posts (and no doubt greater quality).

Well done on your much larger post count tally.
 
Joined
Feb 21, 2003
Messages
4,265
Website
www.politics.ie
Twitter
davidcochrane
Also you are not comparing like with like. The age spreads in the two samples are different and there are 6 groups in the first and 7 in the second.
I'm not comparing every single one, only two age groups that can be compared like for age. My specific figures referred to just 2005, and in my comparisons I only referred to 24 and lower and above 35, both which are pretty easy to draw comparison on. The comparison was just for interesting reasons, not statistical, as I said, only 350 responded to the survey in 2005.

But you read my OP completely, right?
 

uriah

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 18, 2009
Messages
3,618
If I had been asked yesterday to describe the typical p.ie poster (yes, I know the survey was on readers), I would have said 'middle-aged male'.

I would say that less than one in ten posts is written by a female.

There is no real surprise in the information which has been given so far.
 

sondagefaux

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
15,682
If I had been asked yesterday to describe the typical p.ie poster (yes, I know the survey was on readers), I would have said 'middle-aged male'.
I have a feeling that a lot of the readers are also posters.

I would say that less than one in ten posts is written by a female.
Have you seen the thread on the 'readers' by sex? Only about 14% are female!

There is no real surprise in the information which has been given so far.
True. It pretty much corresponds to research on general internet usage and the use of internet forums.
 
Top