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Paramilitaries on O'Connell Street


Supra

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Is it possible to name any of the people who walked in military-style garb on O'Connell Street?

Has anyone looked at any of the pictures and went "I know who that is"?

They obviously desire attention - perhaps we should give them some. Shine a light on them.

Who are they?

Where do they work (or more likely, where do they draw their benefits?). etc.
I'm pretty sure those who need to know this know this.

You can probably find them and their social media accounts being highlighted already in places but I don't see any benefit in it.
 


Hillmanhunter1

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I'm pretty sure those who need to know this know this.

You can probably find them and their social media accounts being highlighted already in places but I don't see any benefit in it.
Sunlight is the best disinfectant.

And they can hardly be said to value their privacy - they marched down the nation's principal thoroughfare.
 

Pyewacket

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I'm pretty sure those who need to know this know this.

You can probably find them and their social media accounts being highlighted already in places but I don't see any benefit in it.
I bloody do. Being able to point and laugh at these tits is the most effective way of dealing with them.

How many of those slobs could manage a ten km military run, basic training ?
 

Lagertha

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So let's get the thread back on track and put the blame where the blame belongs - there wouldn't be an IRA but for occupation of Ireland by England, against the democratic wishes of the people of Ireland.

If real democracy was not denied to Irish people - England would have been shown the door a long time ago, and Lyra would still be alive.
Are you all set for going back to school tomorrow?
 

Lagertha

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Thankfully the majority of Irish people do not think like you. When there is a referendum on a UI the vast majority of Irish people will vote in favour. I believe this will happen in the not to distant future, much to your annoyance, undoubtedly.
Keep dreaming, the people of the Republic don't give an actual tinkers curse about the North and we sure as hell won't pay for it. The only united Ireland you'll ever see is in your dreams. :ROFLMAO:
 

belcoo666

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Keep dreaming, the people of the Republic don't give an actual tinkers curse about the North and we sure as hell won't pay for it. The only united Ireland you'll ever see is in your dreams. :ROFLMAO:
And you know this because .....................................................
Agh right your west Brit friends told you in the cricket club
 

Hillmanhunter1

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Interesting article from the IT:

1916 relatives ‘sickened’ by Saoradh march through Dublin

Asked how his grandparents would feel about the presence of the Saoradh dissident republican group on the streets of Dublin during Easter 1916 commemorations, Mr Norgrove said the organisation was “not representative” of the ideals of participants in the Rising. Saoradh is “more of a criminal organisation than they are a national or a patriotic organisation,” he said. “They’re involved in criminality more than anything else.”

Jacinta Stenson, whose grand-uncle John Nolan was stationed at City Hall in 1916, agreed that the ideals of Saoradh and the New IRA could not be aligned with the views of those who fought more than a hundred years ago.

“Although a united Ireland is definitely something I would love to see it’s just not the way to go about it. It has to be done through politics peacefully, it cannot be done through violence. We’ve come so far from bombs and guns.”

Ms Stenson described feeling “shocked” and “saddened” by the Saoradh march through Dublin’s city centre.

“I’m sure the rest of the relatives were sickened because it’s not what we represent. We don’t want this paramilitary element involved. They don’t want to talk to people, they just want to fight with violence. There’s no place for that, it’s going backwards and sadly Lyra paid with her life for that.”
 

Hillmanhunter1

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"Minister for Health Simon Harris has claimed the group of people who picketed outside his home in Co Wicklow last weekend are supporters of dissident republicans.

A small number of protesters from the ‘Fingal Battalion Direct Action Group’ protested outside Mr Harris’s home in Greystones for the second time in recent weeks.

The group has portrayed itself as anti-austerity and anti-eviction but Mr Harris said its comments on his criticism of Saoradh, whose members paraded in paramilitary style through Dublin on Easter Saturday, exposed its true nature.

Saoradh is a political group that is associated with the New IRA, which was behind the killing of journalist Lyra McKee in Derry.

Mr Harris had said the parade “must be examined and not allowed to happen again”.

One of the group’s online comments read: “Simon slatted [sic] people who commemorated our fallen hero’s [sic] but Simon needs to know he would never be commemorated in this country as he’s one of Ireland’s biggest embarrassments.”"
 

Supra

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Interesting article from the IT:

1916 relatives ‘sickened’ by Saoradh march through Dublin

Asked how his grandparents would feel about the presence of the Saoradh dissident republican group on the streets of Dublin during Easter 1916 commemorations, Mr Norgrove said the organisation was “not representative” of the ideals of participants in the Rising. Saoradh is “more of a criminal organisation than they are a national or a patriotic organisation,” he said. “They’re involved in criminality more than anything else.”

Jacinta Stenson, whose grand-uncle John Nolan was stationed at City Hall in 1916, agreed that the ideals of Saoradh and the New IRA could not be aligned with the views of those who fought more than a hundred years ago.

“Although a united Ireland is definitely something I would love to see it’s just not the way to go about it. It has to be done through politics peacefully, it cannot be done through violence. We’ve come so far from bombs and guns.”

Ms Stenson described feeling “shocked” and “saddened” by the Saoradh march through Dublin’s city centre.

“I’m sure the rest of the relatives were sickened because it’s not what we represent. We don’t want this paramilitary element involved. They don’t want to talk to people, they just want to fight with violence. There’s no place for that, it’s going backwards and sadly Lyra paid with her life for that.”

While I agree with Mrs Stenson, I don't get this idea of relatives being accepted as some sort of authority on Irish History. Would any journalist ask if the ideas of Saoradh could be aligned with the ideas of some of those who fought in the civil war? Would relatives of those who fought in the civil war be seen as having as much authority as those who fought in 1916?
 

loner

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The law of the land, (The Offences Against the State Act) states:

"Save as authorised by a Minister of State under this section, and subject to the exceptions hereinafter mentioned, it shall not be lawful for any assembly of persons to practise or to train or drill themselves in or be trained or drilled in the use of arms or the performance of military exercises, evolutions, or manoeuvres nor for any persons to meet together or assemble for the purpose of so practising or training or drilling or being trained or drilled."

Can someone explain why these scoundrels are not in jail awaiting trial"

View attachment 17683
A good hose and plenty of water would help here
 

Lagertha

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And you know this because .....................................................
Agh right your west Brit friends told you in the cricket club
Few things make me lose any possibility of respect for someone faster than the term ''west Brit''. There's a certain type of person who uses it that well, most people would cross the street to avoid.
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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Curious Journey - The 1916 Easter Rising

While I agree with Mrs Stenson, I don't get this idea of relatives being accepted as some sort of authority on Irish History. Would relatives of those who fought in the civil war be seen as having as much authority as those who fought in 1916?
1916 relatives ‘sickened’ by Saoradh march through Dublin - "Jacinta Stenson, whose grand-uncle John Nolan was stationed at City Hall in 1916, agreed that the ideals of Saoradh and the New IRA could not be aligned with the views of those who fought more than a hundred years ago: “Although a united Ireland is definitely something I would love to see it’s just not the way to go about it. It has to be done through politics peacefully, it cannot be done through violence. We’ve come so far from bombs and guns.”

The relatives are entitled to their opinions, but whatever else 1916 was about, it wasn't about 'Irish Unity' per se, as Ireland wasn't partitioned, at that point in time. If you are looking for a rounded view from participants in the Rising, the War of Independence and the Civil War, I would advise you to watch A Curious Journey, the Kenneth Griffith documentary from 1973, and draw your own conclusions. In the interests of historical accuracy, one of the speakers at the Saoradh Easter Rising Commemoration said they had relatives who were killed during the 1969-1998 phase of the Anglo-Irish Conflict, and another lady from Belfast had relatives who were murdered during the 1940's? I can't remember the exact turn of phrase, but during those periods of conflict, some of the participants in the Rising, the WOI and the Classical Civil War phase of the struggle for Independence, gave orations at Republican Commemorations:

On Christmas Day, 1922, Joseph MacDonagh, TD, who had been Deputy Minister for Labour to Countess Markiewicz, and the brother of the 1916 Easter Rising leader and signatory of the Proclamation of the Irish Republic, Thomas MacDonagh, died at the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital in Eccles Street, when his appendix ruptured during a Hunger Strike. During the Tan war, the War of Independence, the family home in Ranelagh was constantly raided, and his wife and children were subjected to constant abuse and harassment from the soldiers and exposed to the naked brutality of the British Army. In the Post-Treaty election he was re-elected, and he later voted in opposition to the Treaty. When the Civil War broke out he was arrested and imprisoned in Portobello, where he escaped, before being re-arrested and re-jailed. MacDonagh described the executions of Rory O'Connor, Dick Barrett, Liam Mellows and Joe McKelvey on the 8th December, 1922, following the siege of the Four Courts in Dublin, as “a new low.” He embarked on a Hunger Strike in protest at the Free State Government’s treatment of Irish Republican Prisoners. Because his family were such high-profile Republicans, he was hastily removed from prison when it became clear that his appendix had ruptured, and peritonitis had resulted. He was transferred from Mountjoy Jail to the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital on Eccles Street, where he died on Christmas Day, 1922.

Easter 1976

The 1976 Provisional Sinn Féin Easter Rising Commemoration was banned by the Fine Gael-Labour Party Government under the Offences Against the State Act, and several people were arrested and prosecuted for attending and participating, including a number of Cumann na mBan members who took part in the 1916 Rising and the War Of Independence, such as Fiona Plunkett and Máire Comerford. Fiona was the sister of Joseph Mary Plunkett, one of the signatories of the Rising who married Grace Gifford, whose sister Muriel had married Thomas MacDonagh in 1912. In 1942, she spoke at the 1916 Commemoration at Arbor Hill Church, condemning the Irish government under Éamon de Valera's authority for their ill-treatment of Political Prisoners, which included her brother Jack who was on Hunger Strike in Arbor Hill Prison. All references to the 'Plunkett Incident' were censored by the Press in the following days. The Irish Times reported that 10,000 people attended the banned rally, which marched from Stephen’s Green to O’Connell Street, flanked by a line of Gardaí with armed troops on stand-by. Although the event was mostly peaceful, there were scuffles between Gardai and protesters. The Sinn Féin leader Dáithí Ó Conaill told the crowd that Ireland would be free if they put their faith in the Provisionals.
For me, there's also a very thin-line between the tactics described by Martin Waldrun in 1916, and those of latter day incarnations of Physical Force Republicanism, which begs an old question:

"Could revolutionary violence in 1922 and 1968 conceivably be part of one grotesque, protracted process? To accept this argument would, however, be to shatter nationalist icons important to a southern nationalist identity still rooted in its own glorious revolution."
Now, this is an extremely important point, as it implies that a secondary fundamental cause and motivational force underpinning Physical Force Republicanism evolved, parallel to that which flowed from the General Election in 1918, and the 1919 Declaration of Independence, which was the primary and fundamental cause, during the Classical period of the Anglo-Irish Conflict of the War of Independence.

Would any journalist ask if the ideas of Saoradh could be aligned with the ideas of some of those who fought in the civil war?
Fintan O’Toole: Gangsters who call themselves the New IRA are calcified cliché - "Dissident republicans are neither. The idea of dissidence is to oppose and contest received ideas, to challenge calcified cliches...

In fact, these people are not even, properly speaking, Irish nationalists. The core demand of Irish nationalism has always been self-determination for the Irish people as a whole. The Irish people as a whole, North and South, had that act of self-determination on May 22nd, 1998, when we voted simultaneously on whether (in effect) to accept the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement. The so-called dissidents are in revolt, not against “the forces of crown”, but against the self-determination of the Irish people."

1916 Societies: "Hume insisted that any agreement on an internal settlement should be passed by referenda North and South. He hoped this would decisively undermine the legitimacy of the republican position by trumping the result of the 1918 election which led to the formation of a 32-County Dáil Eireann. What many forget is that when the Good Friday referenda took place in May 1998 the two jurisdictions voted on separate questions. The North voted on the all-party agreement while the South voted on removing Articles 2 and 3 of their constitution. Northern Secretary Mo Mowlam made it clear that if any dispute arose only the vote in the North would count. One Fine Gael TD and former Dublin government minister got completely carried away with himself declaring that the results of the referenda were, ‘the purest form of self-determination ever given by the Irish people’. Yet English Northern Secretaries, who between them had never received as much as a single vote in the whole of Ireland, were able to suspend the Executive at will with no reference to the Irish electorate." - 1916 Societies - Home | Facebook

Republican Repulsion -"A point of clarity here. Anti-treaty Republicans opposed the Good Friday Agreement and were in opposition long before 2012. Dissident Republicans dissented from the Sinn Féin narrative, as opposed to opposing it, having implemented it for as long as they did. No doubt that the latter will lack the self-awareness to recognise this distinction. The nationalist community has turned on Republicanism. The only question I can see to ask, is this their purpose?" - The Pensive Quill

Republicanism being 'an idea of dissidence to oppose and contest received ideas', who is dissenting from who, and from what are they dissenting? If what the New IRA engaged in in Derry is reactionary Physical Force Nationalism, why has he savaged Republicanism and not Nationalism?

And this is the way they used to sing it at home..

 
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Antóin Mac Comháin

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And you know this because .....................................................
Agh right your west Brit friends told you in the cricket club
'The name Brittonic derives ultimately from the name Πρεττανική (Prettanike), recorded by Greek authors for the British Isles.'

Gaeilge (Irish); Gàidhlig (Gaelic); Gaelg (Manx); Cymraeg (Welsh); Kernewek (Cornish)

saor; saor; seyr; saer; ser Celtic languages

Cornish and Welsh are sister languages of Brehon, although I don't know the term in that particular dialect, once upon a time the word 'saor' denoted a 'craftsman' or a 'stonemason.' There are over two thousand words in the 6 primary Celtic language dialects which share a common root. Alongside the terms 'Dissident', 'Republicanism' and 'Socialism', the word 'Brit', is one of the most abused in the Irish-English dictionary. Technically speaking, in ethno-anthropological-speak, everybody living in Ireland is a 'west Brit' of one description or another, at least according to the definition of Nationality of Pearse, with language being the primary marker, and I'm nearly sure Cricket is a cousin of Hurling, and a variation of the game in a similar way to Camanachd and Iománaíocht, perhaps more like the street game Rounders which is similar to Baseball. There are certainly different definitions described in some of the folktales and mythological stories. An Puc Fada is as good as it ever got for some..
 

Antóin Mac Comháin

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I'm pretty sure those who need to know this know this.

You can probably find them and their social media accounts being highlighted already in places but I don't see any benefit in it.
According to wiki, the Anti-austerity movement started in Greece and Spain, and is related to the Occupy Movement, which began circa 2011. It's strange to see the Minster of Health conflating the term with 'Dissident Republicanism', which is by-and-large a redundant term. I thought the Anti-Austerity Alliance was an English political construct. 'The idea of dissidence being to oppose and contest received ideas', as per the definition of Fintan O'Toole, I'm not quite sure how what happened in Derry falls under the definition of 'Dissident Republicanism.' Are we confusing the term 'Dissident Nationalism' with 'Dissident Republicanism', and the latter with 'Traditional Republicanism', as a political philosophy? There's a very thin-line between the claims being made by the relatives of 1916, and the New IRA, insofar as the 'democratic expression' of the 1918 General Election was in effect a transferal of power from the Provisional Government to the people, and the National Army were a unit of both, and not in and of themselves 'the government', with the Army being subordinate to the Government, and the latter being subordinate to the people. The truth of the matter is that Nationalists won the Civil War in the North and South against Republicanism, and the latter has never overhauled the former in the North, politically, and Republicans don't have a mandate to wage war as a collective. The definitions are crucial for two reasons, A) To prevent further bloodshed it's necessary to understand what causes it, B) A permanent ceasefire is necessary for Republicanism to secure a mandate from the people, such as the one it received in 1918, and when it does receive it, further violence won't be necessary.
 

LISTOWEL MAN

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the only good to come of Lyra's murder is that it will remind people what they're voting for if they choose sinn fein may 24
 

Glenshane4

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Keep dreaming, the people of the Republic don't give an actual tinkers curse about the North :ROFLMAO:
If that is true (I hope that it is), why do so many Eirefolk pass judgement on people who live in Northern Ireland? Why is Mr Michael Martin trying to have Stormont rule reinstated? Why has he been trying to have our security walls demolished? Why has he been preaching in support of integrated education in Northern Ireland? And there are many like him.
 

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