PBP Promoting Quack Medicine

GJG

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Gino Kenny is currently promoting a bill to legalise medical cannabis. All well and good, there are a couple of conditions where it seems to be useful, not to mention that for someone going through chemo, the odd joint might be the only thing that gives them any quality of life.

But online, Kenny and some other People Before Profit activists are going much further. Kenny has promoted a Facebook page which makes dozens of claims that cannabis directly (and sometimes instantly) cures all sorts of illnesses, including cancer, autism, alzheimer's, epilepsy and more. To be clear, this page – though not Gino Kenny directly – claims that cannabis cures the diseases entirely, rather than alleviating the symptoms or making the suffers feel better.

Some of the posts shared by this page promote conspiracy theories and recommend that people should not go to their doctor, and should stop taking prescription medicine and take some form of cannabis instead.

When challenged online, at least one PBP activist has responded with abuse directed to people questioning their judgement of this. When challenged in an interview, Gino Kenny refused to retract his endorsement and hung up.

Do elected politicians have a duty to avoid endorsing conspiracy websites, particularly where there is the possibility that they promote medically harmful behaviour? Why does someone on the right such as Fidelma Healy Eames get such flak for promoting nonsense and not those on the left?

Listen to the interview.
 


Munnkeyman

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Seizures are difficult to control in the Dravet syndrome, a rare genetic form of epileptic encephalopathy primarily due to loss-of-function mutations in the SCN1A gene. Interest in cannabidiol for the treatment of epilepsy was generated by media reports of efficacy in children with the Dravet syndrome.1 Four small trials of cannabidiol had yielded mixed results.2-5 A series of in vitro and in vivo preclinical models of seizure showed that cannabidiol had activity against convulsive seizures.6 Subsequently, the safety and effectiveness of a standardized oral solution of cannabidiol was tested in an open-label trial involving 214 children and young adults with drug-resistant epilepsy.7 We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of cannabidiol to treat drug-resistant epilepsy in the Dravet syndrome.

MMS: Error

Research evidence is growing. The real issue here is the almost complete unwillingness in the US to allow for research in the past.
 

Henry94.

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Anyone who is taking their medical advice from Gino Kenny is probably high already.
 

Munnkeyman

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Ireland has a real and growing issue with abuse of opioids and opiates and more people are dying every year in Ireland from this when compared to road deaths.

More people dying from opioid overdoses than crashes

Current research is showing a marked decrease in such deaths in states in the US where medicinal marijuana is prescribed.


[h=3]RESULTS[/h]Three states (California, Oregon, and Washington) had medical cannabis laws effective prior to 1999. Ten states (Alaska, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Rhode Island, and Vermont) enacted medical cannabis laws between 1999 and 2010. States with medical cannabis laws had a 24.8% lower mean annual opioid overdose mortality rate (95% CI, −37.5% to −9.5%; P = .003) compared with states without medical cannabis laws. Examination of the association between medical cannabis laws and opioid analgesic overdose mortality in each year after implementation of the law showed that such laws were associated with a lower rate of overdose mortality that generally strengthened over time: year 1 (−19.9%; 95% CI, −30.6% to −7.7%; P = .002), year 2 (−25.2%; 95% CI, −40.6% to −5.9%; P = .01), year 3 (−23.6%; 95% CI, −41.1% to −1.0%; P = .04), year 4 (−20.2%; 95% CI, −33.6% to −4.0%; P = .02), year 5 (−33.7%; 95% CI, −50.9% to −10.4%; P = .008), and year 6 (−33.3%; 95% CI, −44.7% to −19.6%; P < .001). In secondary analyses, the findings remained similar.
Chronic noncancer pain is common in the United States,1 and the proportion of patients with noncancer pain who receive prescriptions for opioids has almost doubled over the past decade.2 In parallel to this increase in prescriptions, rates of opioid use disorders and overdose deaths have risen dramatically.3,4 Policies such as prescription drug monitoring programs, increased scrutiny of patients and providers, and enhanced access to substance abuse treatment have been advocated to reduce the risk of opioid analgesics5; however, relatively less attention has focused on how the availability of alternative nonopioid treatments may affect overdose rates.

As of July 2014, a total of 23 states have enacted laws establishing medical cannabis programs6 and chronic or severe pain is the primary indication in most states.710 Medical cannabis laws are associated with increased cannabis use among adults.11 This increased access to medical cannabis may reduce opioid analgesic use by patients with chronic pain, and therefore reduce opioid analgesic overdoses. Alternatively, if cannabis adversely alters the pharmacokinetics of opioids or serves as a “gateway” or “stepping stone” leading to further substance use,1214 medical cannabis laws may increase opioid analgesic overdoses. Given these potential effects, we examined the relationship between implementation of state medical cannabis laws and opioid analgesic overdose deaths in the United States between 1999 and 2010.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4392651/
 

GDPR

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Research evidence is growing. The real issue here is the almost complete unwillingness in the US to allow for research in the past.
"Reefer madness" has a lot to answer for - driven by absurd notions that black men were pushing weed on white girls in order to have their wicked way with them.

It is my belief that many people in the States currently grossly dependent on oxycontin or other forms of hill-billy heroin, prescribed for their aches and pains, industrial injuries, "nerves" etc would be a lot better off with some superior grass they could get on medicaid/medicare from a licensed pharmacist.
 

ger12

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It's irresponsible imo, and the research just doesn't back it up, maybe it will one day.

Either way, public policy should be informed by best practice and research. And if you're foolish enough to take his advice, then what happens next is your responsibility.

But I've no interest in going down the censorship/banning route I believe favoured by the OP?
 

Munnkeyman

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"Reefer madness" has a lot to answer for - driven by absurd notions that black men were pushing weed on white girls in order to have their wicked way with them.

It is my belief that many people in the States currently grossly dependent on oxycontin or other forms of hill-billy heroin, prescribed for their aches and pains, industrial injuries, "nerves" etc would be a lot better off with some superior grass they could get on medicaid/medicare from a licensed pharmacist.
I actually am one of those hillbilly heroin types and have a chronic illness that sometimes requires an opioid painkiller (well twice this year and this is an exceptionally good year) to enable me to walk, or even tie my shoelaces, in any purposeful way and I'll be honest they are as hooky as anything I've ever come across. The "side effects" (an actual effect) of opioids are fairly off the wall. The idea that people would wish for something to alleviate pain, which has much less of a marked impact on their day-to-day life, is fairly sound.
 
D

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Ireland has a real and growing issue with abuse of opioids and opiates and more people are dying every year in Ireland from this when compared to road deaths.

More people dying from opioid overdoses than crashes

Current research is showing a marked decrease in such deaths in states in the US where medicinal marijuana is prescribed.
Doctors are overprescribing. So much so that this was Super Bowl commercial.

[video=youtube;S8VGKQLcvXY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8VGKQLcvXY[/video]

Think about that. A drug to treat a side effect of opioids warrants a TV spot during the most expensive advertising event there is.
 

making waves

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I actually am one of those hillbilly heroin types and have a chronic illness that sometimes requires an opioid painkiller (well twice this year and this is an exceptionally good year) to enable me to walk, or even tie my shoelaces, in any purposeful way and I'll be honest they are as hooky as anything I've ever come across. The "side effects" (an actual effect) of opioids are fairly off the wall. The idea that people would wish for something to alleviate pain, which has much less of a marked impact on their day-to-day life, is fairly sound.
Opiates are regularly prescribed for people with chronic pain problems.
 

The_SR

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There is a leap here. PBP want to allow a seam of medicine currently illegal to be open to medical professionals to prescribe. Links to websites is hardly the point.
 

corporal punishment

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Big pharma are working hard to discredit medicinal marijuana. I wonder why.
 

GDPR

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I actually am one of those hillbilly heroin types and have a chronic illness that sometimes requires an opioid painkiller (well twice this year and this is an exceptionally good year) to enable me to walk, or even tie my shoelaces, in any purposeful way and I'll be honest they are as hooky as anything I've ever come across. The "side effects" (an actual effect) of opioids are fairly off the wall. The idea that people would wish for something to alleviate pain, which has much less of a marked impact on their day-to-day life, is fairly sound.
I am very sorry to hear that. I have some minor second-hand experience of this from people in my town prescribed (on the NHS) a very potent drug for post herpetic neuralgia and associated conditions which resulted in distinct "personality changes" and other side effects.

And proved very hard to "get off."
 

Munnkeyman

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Opiates are regularly prescribed for people with chronic pain problems.
I really have no choice in that matter at all, it is them or nothing as NSAIDS and other analgesics are about as effective as eating Smarties.
 

GDPR

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I support the legalization of cannabis in order to undermine criminal gangs however it is far from being a safe as it's defenders make out and very often has serious negative effects on the moral character of those who use it. Trots seem to love any degeneracy.
 

The_SR

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I support the legalization of cannabis in order to undermine criminal gangs however it is far from being a safe as it's defenders make out and very often has serious negative effects on the moral character of those who use it. Trots seem to love any degeneracy.
You do her the difference between medicinal marajuana and smoking a spliff? Please tell me you aren't that ignorant?
 

Munnkeyman

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I am very sorry to hear that. I have some minor second-hand experience of this from people in my town prescribed (on the NHS) a very potent drug for post herpetic neuralgia and associated conditions which resulted in distinct "personality changes" and other side effects.

And proved very hard to "get off."
Ah, I'm managing much better this year. :D
It's important that the prescribing is managed adequately by suitable medical professionals and that people aren't self-medicating without supervision. That's where most of the issues really lie.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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May I just point out that PBP is not "Promoting Quack Medicine" and the idea that because one TD liked one FB page makes it so, is typical of the misrepresentation that so unfortunately blights our discourse. Why its almost like saying (for example) that Michael Lowry supports irresponsible gambling.
 

GJG

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There is a leap here. PBP want to allow a seam of medicine currently illegal to be open to medical professionals to prescribe. Links to websites is hardly the point.
Gino Kenny explicitly endorsed a Facebook page...



which is full of manipulative, anti-science nonsense:






When challenged, Gino Kenny declined to withdraw his endorsment.

It's irresponsible imo, and the research just doesn't back it up, maybe it will one day.

Either way, public policy should be informed by best practice and research. And if you're foolish enough to take his advice, then what happens next is your responsibility.

But I've no interest in going down the censorship/banning route I believe favoured by the OP?
I've no interest in censoring or banning, but other posts on this page explicitly recommend boycotting the medical profession, stopping life-saving meds and taking cannabis instead. Are you really saying of people taken in by this 'good enough for them'?
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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That does not mean PBP is supporting Quack Medicine, it means Gino is supporting a friend in gathering testimony. Just like he said.
 
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I am very sorry to hear that. I have some minor second-hand experience of this from people in my town prescribed (on the NHS) a very potent drug for post herpetic neuralgia and associated conditions which resulted in distinct "personality changes" and other side effects.

And proved very hard to "get off."
I can understand that. I broke a few ribs a few years ago and the painkillers I was prescribed were moreish to say the least. Within a week I found myself counting how many I had left several times a day. I got my GP to change prescription and handed those I had left over to her.
 


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