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Perceptions of The North

Irish-Rationalist

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Apr 2, 2016
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For many the north is a place apart. Six counties of Ulster and Ireland separated by a border arbitrarily drawn up in 1921, still under British rule, and containing a different majority populace, and a mixed but different overall cultural ethos to that of the republic. To Unionist's the 6 counties is "Northern Ireland", their "wee country". To Irish Republican's it is viewed as a six county colony, a British statelet, and a legacy and remnant of British imperialist rule in Ireland.

We're all too familiar with the socio-political situation and its troubled past, but how many of you have actually gone there, studied there, shopped there, worked and perhaps lived there? How many of you have experienced the north at first hand, and perhaps spoken with the Protestant and Unionist people who live there? What were your perceptions of them, and how did you feel in a segregated part of Ireland?

What are your perceptions of the north and northerners?
 


between the bridges

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Sep 21, 2011
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The wan thing that unites us is our dislike of mexicants, and as for mexicant socks...
 

Jim Car

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For many the north is a place apart. Six counties of Ulster and Ireland separated by a border arbitrarily drawn up in 1921, still under British rule, and containing a different majority populace, and a mixed but different overall cultural ethos to that of the republic. To Unionist's the 6 counties is "Northern Ireland", their "wee country". To Irish Republican's it is viewed as a six county colony, a British statelet, and a legacy and remnant of British imperialist rule in Ireland.

We're all too familiar with the socio-political situation and its troubled past, but how many of you have actually gone there, studied there, shopped there, worked and perhaps lived there? How many of you have experienced the north at first hand, and perhaps spoken with the Protestant and Unionist people who live there? What were your perceptions of them, and how did you feel in a segregated part of Ireland?

What are your perceptions of the north and northerners?
Some claim this, but I regularly (or at least did not as much now) had to go north of the boarder. I have said before I only noticed I was north on one occasion when I was being beeped at because I was driving at 70km as instead of 70mph. So the boarder is effectively non existent. No difference in driving to Belfast as there is in driving to cork. As for when I get up there never really had any problems at all. The only thing that reminds you that you are in a different jurisdiction are the currency, speed signs and flags (depending where you are). People who want to make a big deal of the boarder will be the reality is there is nothing there.
 

farnaby

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May 15, 2006
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1,930
Have worked with Unionists in the UK, including a guy whose RUC father was killed by the IRA. Got on great.

Tend to find that out of their natural habitat, if you have an Englishman, northern Unionist and southern Irish in the same room the two Irish will have a lot more to talk about.

Love visiting the north, wish I had more reason to travel there.

Nothing sexier than a pretty girl with a northern accent.
Nothing scarier than an ugly bloke with a northern accent.
 

SilverSpurs

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Nov 27, 2009
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For many the north is a place apart. Six counties of Ulster and Ireland separated by a border arbitrarily drawn up in 1921, still under British rule, and containing a different majority populace, and a mixed but different overall cultural ethos to that of the republic. To Unionist's the 6 counties is "Northern Ireland", their "wee country". To Irish Republican's it is viewed as a six county colony, a British statelet, and a legacy and remnant of British imperialist rule in Ireland.

We're all too familiar with the socio-political situation and its troubled past, but how many of you have actually gone there, studied there, shopped there, worked and perhaps lived there? How many of you have experienced the north at first hand, and perhaps spoken with the Protestant and Unionist people who live there? What were your perceptions of them, and how did you feel in a segregated part of Ireland?

What are your perceptions of the north and northerners?
I would say that increasingly social class is becoming the greater sectarian divide. My sporting career encompassed some very posh sports and this brought me into contact with many upper middle class Ulster Protestants who were very welcoming of me due to my upper middle class status and indeed they showed utter contempt for lower class protestants and loyalists. A protestant from the Shankill Road would be treated like a leper by the protestants from the Malone Road.
 

derryman

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Have worked with Unionists in the UK, including a guy whose RUC father was killed by the IRA. Got on great.

Tend to find that out of their natural habitat, if you have an Englishman, northern Unionist and southern Irish in the same room the two Irish will have a lot more to talk about.

Love visiting the north, wish I had more reason to travel there.

Nothing sexier than a pretty girl with a northern accent.
Nothing scarier than an ugly bloke with a northern accent.
You want to stay away from Fermanagh then . They have ugly woman with northern accents ,and beards.
 

fontenoy

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Jan 4, 2011
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I would say that increasingly social class is becoming the greater sectarian divide. My sporting career encompassed some very posh sports and this brought me into contact with many upper middle class Ulster Protestants who were very welcoming of me due to my upper middle class status and indeed they showed utter contempt for lower class protestants and loyalists. A protestant from the Shankill Road would be treated like a leper by the protestants from the Malone Road.
As it has always been, useful fodder at times for big house Unionism. To be quickly discarded when purpose has been served.
 

Irish-Rationalist

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Apr 2, 2016
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Have worked with Unionists in the UK, including a guy whose RUC father was killed by the IRA. Got on great.

Tend to find that out of their natural habitat, if you have an Englishman, northern Unionist and southern Irish in the same room the two Irish will have a lot more to talk about.

Love visiting the north, wish I had more reason to travel there.

Nothing sexier than a pretty girl with a northern accent.
Nothing scarier than an ugly bloke with a northern accent.
That's the stange thing about Unionism. Most Unionist's identify as British and will identify with the UK a lot more than they do with the rest of Ireland. Yet when they set foot in England their accent sets them apart and they are perceived as Irish. Then they feel compelled to explain that they are "British" and "Northern Irish!", and whilst sipping a Guinness in an Irish pub in the company of other Irish people.

Of course any English bloke with a rudimentary knowledge of British-Irish history will understand them, but the great majority of English, through ignorance and/or apathy, simply view them as plain old Irish like the rest of us. I think this is what annoys them the most. They want special category status.
 

Irish-Rationalist

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Apr 2, 2016
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I would say that increasingly social class is becoming the greater sectarian divide. My sporting career encompassed some very posh sports and this brought me into contact with many upper middle class Ulster Protestants who were very welcoming of me due to my upper middle class status and indeed they showed utter contempt for lower class protestants and loyalists. A protestant from the Shankill Road would be treated like a leper by the protestants from the Malone Road.
The classic divider of social class was sidelined in the north by the traditional and more prominent dividers of nationality, political ideology and of course religion. Working class Unionist's are generally viewed as 'scum' by most middle class Unionists, who have traditionally used working class Unionist paramilitaries as muscle and a threat in times of vulnerability and need. They then denounced and disowned them whenever they carried out violent acts in defence of their union. This manipulation, hypocrisy and class contempt has always characterised the attitude of big house Unionist's towards their less well off Unionist peers. The Unionist working class have no political representation on the left of the political spectrum (bar the small minority party PUP), as Unionism has traditionally been right-wing.
 

blokesbloke

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Jan 13, 2011
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I want to visit Ireland - I haven't been since I was a wee childer - but I admit that before I came on here I wouldn't even have considered visiting NI. To me it was just a scary place full of people who hated each other and I've have been too scared I'd have ended up in a CNR area and they wouldn't appreciate an English accent.

I have since been disabused of this notion by many on P.ie, so I would certainly no longer rule it out, but I would still feel a bit uncomfortable going. I would worry about causing offence.
 

stopdoingstuff

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Feb 26, 2011
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22,377
I quite like the North, and that includes the squatters. In general the accent is horrible and some form of brutal speech therapy should be applied to everyone North of Drogheda, but actual Northerners have balls and respect their identities. Down here we are busy denying our identity and debollocking ourselves by mindless Europhilia.
 

Belfastdan

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Mar 23, 2016
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174
I would say that increasingly social class is becoming the greater sectarian divide. My sporting career encompassed some very posh sports and this brought me into contact with many upper middle class Ulster Protestants who were very welcoming of me due to my upper middle class status and indeed they showed utter contempt for lower class protestants and loyalists. A protestant from the Shankill Road would be treated like a leper by the protestants from the Malone Road.
Except of course when there is some dirty business to be done like the UWC strike.
 

Gurdiev77

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Apr 25, 2016
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Yesterday, LeBlanc, who made his name playing the character of Joey Tribiani in the US sit-com 'Friends', posed for pictures around the Lakes of Killarney as interested onlookers tried to get a glimpse of the popular star.

It was his first time in the Republic, though he did visit Belfast a few years back. He said: "Yeah, I remember I was flying in, it was during the Orange marches in 1997, and I looked out the window and saw all these lights. It was only when I got closer I realised those were flames. But, no, I had a great time there and we're having a great time here."
Yesterday, LeBlanc, who made his name playing the character of Joey Tribiani in the US sit-com 'Friends', posed for pictures around the Lakes of Killarney as interested onlookers tried to get a glimpse of the popular star.

It was his first time in the Republic, though he did visit Belfast a few years back. He said: "Yeah, I remember I was flying in, it was during the Orange marches in 1997, and I looked out the window and saw all these lights. It was only when I got closer I realised those were flames. But, no, I had a great time there and we're having a great time here."
 

GDPR

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Jul 5, 2008
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Never been in Ulster. Furthest north I've been is sligo on one side and Dublin airport on the other. Probably won't visit anytime soon either. It's like several places down south for me, never been and no plans of going. I don't count driving along a main road as having being there either. I'm not missing much I suspect.
 
T

Thomas_..

For many the north is a place apart. Six counties of Ulster and Ireland separated by a border arbitrarily drawn up in 1921, still under British rule, and containing a different majority populace, and a mixed but different overall cultural ethos to that of the republic. To Unionist's the 6 counties is "Northern Ireland", their "wee country". To Irish Republican's it is viewed as a six county colony, a British statelet, and a legacy and remnant of British imperialist rule in Ireland.

We're all too familiar with the socio-political situation and its troubled past, but how many of you have actually gone there, studied there, shopped there, worked and perhaps lived there? How many of you have experienced the north at first hand, and perhaps spoken with the Protestant and Unionist people who live there? What were your perceptions of them, and how did you feel in a segregated part of Ireland?

What are your perceptions of the north and northerners?
Why didn´t you start this thread in the NI Forum, where is belongs to?
 
T

Thomas_..

I want to visit Ireland - I haven't been since I was a wee childer - but I admit that before I came on here I wouldn't even have considered visiting NI. To me it was just a scary place full of people who hated each other and I've have been too scared I'd have ended up in a CNR area and they wouldn't appreciate an English accent.

I have since been disabused of this notion by many on P.ie, so I would certainly no longer rule it out, but I would still feel a bit uncomfortable going. I would worry about causing offence.
I´d suggest, go there on the 12th July and stick with the Unionists. At least, you´d seen some original NI culture and you´d have to be "ashamed" of being British at all.
 

johnnypockets

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Mar 30, 2010
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14,936
A while since I was there now. Hoping to go next month again for a course. Any recommendations on somewhere nice to stay?(in Belfast)
 


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