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Plans for EU tax, proposals expected tomorrow


hiker

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May 9, 2005
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1,961
I used to love reading the Economist. I had it delivered to my door for a few years and then I went off it because of its Anti-Euro / Pro-Anglo philosophy but now I'm friends with it again.

There are few publications who regularly mention, challange, discuss, shout about, rant over or just plain talk about the european union like the Economist.

The day the Economist stops talking about the EU is the day I get worried.
 

setanta

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Apr 2, 2004
Messages
649
Yawn, more europhobic whinging from the usual British sources ...

The European Commission is examining options for reforming budget-setting in the EU, including options for transfering a proportion, or even all, of EU budget funding, from direct member state transfers to pan-European revenue-raising. One of the options, promoted in particular by the Party of European Socialists, is a Financial Transaction Tax (FTT) which would raise almost €200 billion per annum alone.

Given that the 2010 EU budget is a little over €140bn, just implementing an FTT would cover the EU budget and create a fund which would be used for employment and training support as well as investment in the transition to a green economy, the key driver for future ecnomic growth and job creation.

But hey, simplistic EU-bashing is so much more fun, isn't it?
 

Cassandra Syndrome

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Aug 23, 2009
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16,908
I would sooner read the Beano to enlighten myself about the social science that deals with the scarcity of resources.
 

Cassandra Syndrome

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50% of it is owned by the Rothschilds by the way.
 

brughahaha

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Jun 1, 2009
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Yawn, more europhobic whinging from the usual British sources ...

The European Commission is examining options for reforming budget-setting in the EU, including options for transfering a proportion, or even all, of EU budget funding, from direct member state transfers to pan-European revenue-raising. One of the options, promoted in particular by the Party of European Socialists, is a Financial Transaction Tax (FTT) which would raise almost €200 billion per annum alone.

Given that the 2010 EU budget is a little over €140bn, just implementing an FTT would cover the EU budget and create a fund which would be used for employment and training support as well as investment in the transition to a green economy, the key driver for future ecnomic growth and job creation.

But hey, simplistic EU-bashing is so much more fun, isn't it?


Well exposing the utter guff that was spouted by pro EU posters and campaigners that ridiculed anyone who suggested that Lisbon might lead to EU tax raising powers

but one example
Libertas is simply wrong about Lisbon Treaty and Tax - Chartered Accountants Ireland - Chartered Accountants Ireland
Yes for recovery .... where?
Yes for Jobs...... where ?
Itr wont lead to EU tax raising .... oh yes it will

The Yes to Lisbon campaigners should hang their head in shame for the amount of lies they told
 

Watcher2

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Joined
May 2, 2010
Messages
34,106
Include in that the lie that it would increase efficiency in decision making and then look at the sheer hames and length of time it took them to agree to the Greek bailout and the sheer damage and upheaval caused as the EU monkeys fell at every single hurdle.
 

TaxHavenSite

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Joined
Oct 17, 2010
Messages
388
Shouldnt the EU be more of an alliance,or general understanding,and be more automated? Why does there need to be so much expenses. You could probably run the EU,with a supercomputer,and some IT guys.
 

kerdasi amaq

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Aug 24, 2009
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4,690
Maybe the best way for the European Commission to save the taxpayer money(chortle) is for it to abolish itself.
 

Bobert

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Mar 28, 2008
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1,072
Yawn, more europhobic whinging from the usual British sources ...

The European Commission is examining options for reforming budget-setting in the EU, including options for transfering a proportion, or even all, of EU budget funding, from direct member state transfers to pan-European revenue-raising. One of the options, promoted in particular by the Party of European Socialists, is a Financial Transaction Tax (FTT) which would raise almost €200 billion per annum alone.

Given that the 2010 EU budget is a little over €140bn, just implementing an FTT would cover the EU budget and create a fund which would be used for employment and training support as well as investment in the transition to a green economy, the key driver for future ecnomic growth and job creation.

But hey, simplistic EU-bashing is so much more fun, isn't it?
So we're getting taxes then?
 

setanta

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Joined
Apr 2, 2004
Messages
649
Tiresomely predictable how every subsequent comment to mine was nothing more than EU-bashing with no serious attempt to address the issue of tax raising powers. But then it's easier and lazier for europhobes to mount half-assed attacks on the EU rather than to actually address any of the serious issues involved.

OTOH, Hi Bobert .. and thanks for your question.

Any development towards the EU gaining tax-raising powers itself, such as the FTT, requires unanimity by the member states. So, the answer to your question is, "only if the member states agree". In addition, if the prime candidate for an EU tax, namely the FTT, is introduced then "we", as in the poor benighted taxpayer, will not be paying it, but rather hedge funds and other financial sector actors. Looks increasingly like a good idea, so!
 

brughahaha

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Jun 1, 2009
Messages
15,304
Tiresomely predictable how every subsequent comment to mine was nothing more than EU-bashing with no serious attempt to address the issue of tax raising powers. But then it's easier and lazier for europhobes to mount half-assed attacks on the EU rather than to actually address any of the serious issues involved.
Pot Kettle Black .... any order you like :rolleyes::rolleyes::lol:
 

ibis

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Mar 12, 2005
Messages
12,359
Itr wont lead to EU tax raising .... oh yes it will
Oh no - it still doesn't, and didn't. The ability of the EU to institute something like a Tobin tax predates the Lisbon Treaty. It's always been a possibility, because the member states have always been able to unanimously decide on a tax whose proceeds go to the EU - or the Red Cross, or the UN, come to that.

Still, that wasn't something a lot of No people got at the time, and they're even less likely to get it now that they have some correlation to confuse with causation.
 

Clanrickard

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Apr 25, 2008
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ONQ

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May 27, 2009
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476
Oh no - it still doesn't, and didn't. The ability of the EU to institute something like a Tobin tax predates the Lisbon Treaty. It's always been a possibility, because the member states have always been able to unanimously decide on a tax whose proceeds go to the EU - or the Red Cross, or the UN, come to that.

Still, that wasn't something a lot of No people got at the time, and they're even less likely to get it now that they have some correlation to confuse with causation.

Let them raise a 10% Tobin tax on the Derivatives market for five years to deal with the mess we're in and take the weight off the taxpayer.

The banks and finance houses screwed up - let them pay for it.
 

setanta

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Joined
Apr 2, 2004
Messages
649
Let them raise a 10% Tobin tax on the Derivatives market for five years to deal with the mess we're in and take the weight off the taxpayer.

The banks and finance houses screwed up - let them pay for it.
The PES (Party of European Socialists) are campaigning for a tax rate on financial transactions of 0.05% which will generate €200 billion of revenues annually in Europe alone. The campaign can be found at Europeans for Financial Reform
 
Last edited:

Watcher2

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Joined
May 2, 2010
Messages
34,106
Tiresomely predictable how every subsequent comment to mine was nothing more than EU-bashing with no serious attempt to address the issue of tax raising powers. But then it's easier and lazier for europhobes to mount half-assed attacks on the EU rather than to actually address any of the serious issues involved.

OTOH, Hi Bobert .. and thanks for your question.

Any development towards the EU gaining tax-raising powers itself, such as the FTT, requires unanimity by the member states. So, the answer to your question is, "only if the member states agree". In addition, if the prime candidate for an EU tax, namely the FTT, is introduced then "we", as in the poor benighted taxpayer, will not be paying it, but rather hedge funds and other financial sector actors. Looks increasingly like a good idea, so!
But it is soooo easy and sooooooo much fun.
 

Bobert

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Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,072
OTOH, Hi Bobert .. and thanks for your question.

Any development towards the EU gaining tax-raising powers itself, such as the FTT, requires unanimity by the member states. So, the answer to your question is, "only if the member states agree". In addition, if the prime candidate for an EU tax, namely the FTT, is introduced then "we", as in the poor benighted taxpayer, will not be paying it, but rather hedge funds and other financial sector actors. Looks increasingly like a good idea, so!
And you think they wouldn't support it? You know as well as I do that governments have a tendency to agree with Europe.
 
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