Plastic bottles & aluminium cans litter - Dealing with excess packaging - Time for a levy?

Éamonn an Chnoic

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In the same way that the plastic bag levy did wonders in reducing plastic bags, would a plastic bottle levy do the same? I was recently involved in a street clean and plastic bottles and soft drink and beer cans made up the majority of the rubbish collected.

In some countries in Europe, plastic bottles can be brought back to the supermarket where you get a small refund. These bottles seem to made of stronger plastic that what we get here so they only need to be washed and relabelled to be reused. Why can't we introduce that here?

What about banning the smaller plastic bottles altogether? Bringing back glass bottles, tastes better as does milk from a carton.

Every time I go for a walk the amount of plastic bottle and beers cans littered everywhere depresses me. Surely it's time the Irish government did something about plastic bottles and excess packaging.

Any opinions?
 


Lúidín

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This is a sensible, economic and environmentally friendly idea.
It'll never happen with the present administration.
 

Roberto Jordan

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In the same way that the plastic bag levy did wonders in reducing plastic bags, would a plastic bottle levy do the same? I was recently involved in a street clean and plastic bottles and soft drink and beer cans made up the majority of the rubbish collected.

In some countries in Europe, plastic bottles can be brought back to the supermarket where you get a small refund. These bottles seem to made of stronger plastic that what we get here so they only need to be washed and relabelled to be reused. Why can't we introduce that here?

What about banning the smaller plastic bottles altogether? Bringing back glass bottles, tastes better as does milk from a carton.

Every time I go for a walk the amount of plastic bottle and beers cans littered everywhere depresses me. Surely it's time the Irish government did something about plastic bottles and excess packaging.

Any opinions?
PLastic bottles that are recycled are not washed and reused directly. The PET resin from which they are made is recycled.

Only certain glass bottles are recycled directly when part of a controlled float e.g. in ireland this would be pubs returning glass bottles directly to supplier
Other glass bottles are recycled as per plastic with glass being remelted.

Result of hours wasted studying a commodidty trade that went nowhere.
 

enuffisenuff

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wtf is my recycle bin for then?
 

realistic1

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This is a sensible, economic and environmentally friendly idea.
It'll never happen with the present administration.
and what "administration" will sort it? Remember we had the Greens in Power and all we got from them was a crazy carbon tax that hits lower income Citizens.
 

gleeful

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If they actually enforced existing littering laws, that might be a good start.
 

farnaby

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The company I work for has banned use of plastic bottles in its offices. Everyone gets a refillable bottle for their desk; jugs of water and glasses are provided for meetings where before everyone would get a plastic bottle.

Easy to implement, thousands of bottles per year saved.

Don't wait for govt regulation - go direct to employers to change the culture.
 

Hans Von Horn

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In the same way that the plastic bag levy did wonders in reducing plastic bags, would a plastic bottle levy do the same? I was recently involved in a street clean and plastic bottles and soft drink and beer cans made up the majority of the rubbish collected.

In some countries in Europe, plastic bottles can be brought back to the supermarket where you get a small refund. These bottles seem to made of stronger plastic that what we get here so they only need to be washed and relabelled to be reused. Why can't we introduce that here?

What about banning the smaller plastic bottles altogether? Bringing back glass bottles, tastes better as does milk from a carton.

Every time I go for a walk the amount of plastic bottle and beers cans littered everywhere depresses me. Surely it's time the Irish government did something about plastic bottles and excess packaging.

Any opinions?

Much better to drink water.
 

Hans Von Horn

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I do. And I avoid plastic wherever I can. But so many other people dont, the country's litter problem is a mess. I am just wondering what is the best thing we can do to improve the situation. Other countries dont seem half as littered as Ireland

Appoint litter sheriffs and let them keep the fines.
 

greengoose2

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I do. And I avoid plastic wherever I can. But so many other people dont, the country's litter problem is a mess. I am just wondering what is the best thing we can do to improve the situation. Other countries dont seem half as littered as Ireland
We are dirty people! The proof is there. Instead of being defensive on this filth issue it should be addressed. That is what we have politicians, police, courts and judges for. They are inept, the whole gang!

Oh, another thing; dog owners...

 

Roll_On

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100% agree, in Germany and Austria you bring back your bottles glass or plastic and you get a small amount off your shop. The glass bottles are reused up to 15 times before they are melted down and recycled. A much more efficient use of energy.

There needs to be heavy taxes placed on packaging in supermarkets. I bought two courgettes yesterday in a rigid plastic tray wrapped in a soft plastic (non-recycleable) film. That kind of ridiculousness needs to stop, we're all about recycling in this country, but nobody seems to want to do the reduce and reuse part.
 

Watcher2

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I do. And I avoid plastic wherever I can. But so many other people dont, the country's litter problem is a mess. I am just wondering what is the best thing we can do to improve the situation. Other countries dont seem half as littered as Ireland
Other countries peoples seem to have a much greater sense of civic duty. Irish people tend to not have any sense of civic duty whatsoever. I think it comes from the top i.e. politics and politicians. No accountability whatsoever so why would people take accountability themselves? There is also no enforcement except for the most basic of things, and even then its impact is poor (speeding for example). Where are our liter wardens? Where are our dog wardens (dog poo everywhere)?
 

good dog

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Plastic bottles, both PET from coke and PE from milk bottles are environmentally friendly once recycled properly. They are cheap to produce using little energy and can be produced on the site of use eliminating the need to haul empty bottles such as would be the case with glass.
PET bottles are recycled into food trays, Ned bottles etc but mostly spun into thread, if anyone is wearing polyester clothing right now they are wearing recycled PET bottle.
PE bottles are recycled into drainage pipes, car fuel tanks etc.
If bottles are not being recycled it's not the fault of the product or the industry, it's the people that don't put the things into the recycling bin that is the problem.
 

good dog

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100% agree, in Germany and Austria you bring back your bottles glass or plastic and you get a small amount off your shop. The glass bottles are reused up to 15 times before they are melted down and recycled. A much more efficient use of energy.

There needs to be heavy taxes placed on packaging in supermarkets. I bought two courgettes yesterday in a rigid plastic tray wrapped in a soft plastic (non-recycleable) film. That kind of ridiculousness needs to stop, we're all about recycling in this country, but nobody seems to want to do the reduce and reuse part.
They used to reuse pub mixer bottles here once but don't anymore. Cheaper to recycle back into new bottles. Bulmers cider bottles and some Guinness bottles are washed and reused.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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Plastic-eating worms may offer solution to mounting waste, Stanford researchers discover | Stanford News Release

Plastic-eating worms may offer solution to mounting waste, Stanford researchers discover.


An ongoing study by Stanford engineers, in collaboration with researchers in China, shows that common mealworms can safely biodegrade various types of plastic.

BY ROB JORDAN


Mealworms munch on Styrofoam, a hopeful sign that solutions to plastics pollution exist.

Wei-Min Wu, a senior research engineer in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, discovered the larvae can live on polystyrene.


Consider the plastic foam cup. Every year, Americans throw away 2.5 billion of them. And yet, that waste is just a fraction of the 33 million tons of plastic Americans discard every year. Less than 10 percent of that total gets recycled, and the remainder presents challenges ranging from water contamination to animal poisoning.

Enter the mighty mealworm. The tiny worm, which is the larvae form of the darkling beetle, can subsist on a diet of Styrofoam and other forms of polystyrene, according to two companion studies co-authored by Wei-Min Wu, a senior research engineer in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford. Microorganisms in the worms' guts biodegrade the plastic in the process – a surprising and hopeful finding.
 

Trainwreck

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In the same way that the plastic bag levy did wonders in reducing plastic bags, would a plastic bottle levy do the same? I was recently involved in a street clean and plastic bottles and soft drink and beer cans made up the majority of the rubbish collected.

In some countries in Europe, plastic bottles can be brought back to the supermarket where you get a small refund. These bottles seem to made of stronger plastic that what we get here so they only need to be washed and relabelled to be reused. Why can't we introduce that here?

What about banning the smaller plastic bottles altogether? Bringing back glass bottles, tastes better as does milk from a carton.

Every time I go for a walk the amount of plastic bottle and beers cans littered everywhere depresses me. Surely it's time the Irish government did something about plastic bottles and excess packaging.

Any opinions?

I think it is time for a fada levy. An annual charge on fadas used in names.

And a tariff on compound surnames or use of apostrophes too.


Both of these are excessive, a waste and a cost on society.
 

Spanner Island

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In the same way that the plastic bag levy did wonders in reducing plastic bags, would a plastic bottle levy do the same? I was recently involved in a street clean and plastic bottles and soft drink and beer cans made up the majority of the rubbish collected.

In some countries in Europe, plastic bottles can be brought back to the supermarket where you get a small refund. These bottles seem to made of stronger plastic that what we get here so they only need to be washed and relabelled to be reused. Why can't we introduce that here?

What about banning the smaller plastic bottles altogether? Bringing back glass bottles, tastes better as does milk from a carton.

Every time I go for a walk the amount of plastic bottle and beers cans littered everywhere depresses me. Surely it's time the Irish government did something about plastic bottles and excess packaging.

Any opinions?
Enforce the litter and fly tipping laws that are already in place... and make penalties more severe and prohibitive...

More bins wouldn't go amiss either...

We're a dirty race... we Irish... the evidence of which is everyhwere.

Don't know about a levy tbh... the answer to everything by some seems to be to try and screw more money out of people...

Plus with bags there's the re-usable option... whereas plastic bottles that are re-used have been found to have more germs on them than toilet seats...
 

Watcher2

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I agree with most of what you say here but there are some Irish people who do have a sense of civic duty. I picked up bottles as I walked last night and put them in the bin.

There are beach cleans and street cleans done regularly. Id actually argue the vast majority of people dont litter. Just the ignorant minority.
Apologies, I did not mean to infer that there is no one without a sense of civic duty. I have been involved in a number of village and estate cleans over the years. I, my wife and my children have all cleaned up other peoples liter. Just this weekend, although I was not involved in this one, there was a village clean up where I live. But I think WE are in the minority contrary to what you are saying. Sure, perhaps most people will clean after themselves, but not necessarily from a sense of civic mindedness and some that will put their liter in the bins will let their dogs sh1t where they like. But that's my cynical view. Maybe too cynical and blinkered.
 


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