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Political Correctness - Black Skin


eoinod

Active member
Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
261
Has political correctness gone mad?

I have to discuss African ethnic diversity next week and have hit a bit of a problem. The group I will be talking to are terribly politically correct so obviously I need to be careful.

Anyway, I simply cannot think of a term for someone with black skin that is both politically correct and does not include the phrase "africa".

The only politically correct words for "na fir gorm" are Afro-carribean and African-American which won't really work with what I am saying and in any case are misleading terms when you consider the vast numbers of Africans who are not "Afro-caribbean"...

Advice on suitable wording would also be appreciated...
(and please no racist rants..)
 

Sync

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2009
Messages
28,845
Stick with the african equivilants of anglo-saxon, celt, so arabs, berbers etc. Saying "black" isn't true for the continent, as you wouldn't likely describe an Egyptian as black for instance, no more than you would describe everyone from the North American continent as white.
 

Bobert

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,072
Minstrels.
 

eyeswideopen

Active member
Joined
Nov 6, 2009
Messages
260
Has political correctness gone mad?

I have to discuss African ethnic diversity next week and have hit a bit of a problem. The group I will be talking to are terribly politically correct so obviously I need to be careful.

Anyway, I simply cannot think of a term for someone with black skin that is both politically correct and does not include the phrase "africa".

The only politically correct words for "na fir gorm" are Afro-carribean and African-American which won't really work with what I am saying and in any case are misleading terms when you consider the vast numbers of Africans who are not "Afro-caribbean"...

Advice on suitable wording would also be appreciated...
(and please no racist rants..)
what are you trying to say ? If you are talking about African ethnic diversity, whats the problem? If you are talking about Africa, why should you not use the term Africa ?:confused:
 

Mitsui2

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
33,382
Anyone remember that wonderful occasion, early in the history of the new South Africa (possibly Mandela's first US trip as President) when an American tv newsperson, blinkered by local historical eff-ups, unthinkingly referred to Nelson Mandela as "Afro-American"?

No? I'm getting old, I guess.
 

Fermoy

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 25, 2009
Messages
620
It would seem that the first topic of discussion at the event is this very one that you have raised here.
 

TommyO'Brien

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
12,222
Has political correctness gone mad?

I have to discuss African ethnic diversity next week and have hit a bit of a problem. The group I will be talking to are terribly politically correct so obviously I need to be careful.

Anyway, I simply cannot think of a term for someone with black skin that is both politically correct and does not include the phrase "africa".

The only politically correct words for "na fir gorm" are Afro-carribean and African-American which won't really work with what I am saying and in any case are misleading terms when you consider the vast numbers of Africans who are not "Afro-caribbean"...

Advice on suitable wording would also be appreciated...
(and please no racist rants..)
It reminds me of the hilarity some years ago when a US journalist was interviewing Nelson Mandela, newly elected South African president. The journalist wanted to say "how does it feel to be the first Black president of your country?" But his American station said 'black' would be racist. He forgot to come up with an alternative phrase, started the interview, and was half way down the question when he saw in his notes that he still had the question phrased with the word "black" in it. So he stumbled, and ended up saying to a puzzled Mandela, "So Mr President, how does it feel to be the first . . . eh. . . African American president of South Africa?"

Oops.
 

greenporcupine

Active member
Joined
Oct 21, 2009
Messages
114
The 'ab original ' peoples ,the native originals before history. Having taught African's of different groupings ,I would not worry too much.
Whatever you do get rid of being too correct.The worst people are the politically correct who are usually 'racist underneath.Making faux pas is normal when talking to diverse groups .What makes it embarrasing is being too sensitive.That shows you are not natural with people.You are talking to people,not a colour .Under the skin we are all similiar,stupid. Oh not you people.
 

sickpuppy

Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
88
Well it has never been a problem for any black friends of mine in England. Any more than 'white' is a problem for me (a fairly olive-skinned hangover from the Spanish Armada). If your audience are trendy white middle-class liberals, tell them they're racist for not using the term. That'll shut them up.
I thought the spanish sailor shagged my great granny thing was a myth? The olive skin probably comes from our basque roots
 

eoinod

Active member
Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
261
It would seem that the first topic of discussion at the event is this very one that you have raised here.
It certainly will be now!

Thanks for the help, not looking forward to this though :(
 
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