Poll: Cut spending, don't raise taxes, tax/means-test child-benefit

FutureTaoiseach

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Today's Irish Examiner poll confirms that the Irish people are rejecting the Socialist narrative of the solutions to the recession. It confirms:

- 70% support means-testing or taxing of child-benefit for high-earners.

- 81% want the Croke Park Agreement scrapped, regarding it as "unrealistic" to not cut the numbers employed in the public-sector. 13% disagree.

Irish Examiner said:
Some 81% of those surveyed thought the notion of the partnership deal maintaining jobs was unrealistic. Just 13% felt it was liable to remain intact for the lifetime of the Four-Year Plan.
- Just one-third think Eamon Gilmore would make a good Taoiseach, compared to 20% for Enda Kenny.

- Just 23% think Labour's policies "would solve the economic turmoil", compared to 25% for Fine Gael's.

- 60% want a national-government of all parties.

- 75% want the Seanad abolished.

- Over two-thirds oppose raising the corporation-tax rate above its current 12.5%.

- 60% believe "Ireland no longer has the power to make its own financial decisions"

- 75% believe the country is heading "in the wrong direction".

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In that context, has Labour peaked too soon, as the Irish people realise his party offer the Irish people nothing but more of the Big Government, tax-and-spend, agenda that created the economic crisis in the first place?
 


W..R.H

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Sorry but are the majority of those stats not from the poll of 100 people, in which case, is not a big enough sampling number.

It's only the questions on taxes and spending that used 1000.
 

Harmonica

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- 70% support means-testing or taxing of child-benefit for high-earners.

- 60% want a national-government of all parties.
While I have no doubt the majority of people will all things being equal pick cuts over taxes two points.

Everyone believes other people are the high earners.

A national government would voters have absolutely no say in choosing their government or policies.
 

FutureTaoiseach

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Sorry but are the majority of those stats not from the poll of 100 people, in which case, is not a big enough sampling number.

It's only the questions on taxes and spending that used 1000.
In fact, the reference to a sample of 100 person only occurs here:
80% agreed that at 166, we have too many TDs. Separately, Irish Examiner journalists interviewed 100 people face-to-face on streets across the country. http://examiner.ie/home/leave-taxes-alone-and-cut-spending-warn-public-138483.html#ixzz179IjDyOx

 

Realityman

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Jesus -with a poll like this, one would think the examiner was nothing but a mouthpiece forFG and the in house publication of the Cork merchant princes.

oh-i forgot -it is
 

evercloserunion

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Some 81% of those surveyed thought the notion of the partnership deal maintaining jobs was unrealistic. Just 13% felt it was liable to remain intact for the lifetime of the Four-Year Plan.
That could be interpreted in two ways. It doesn't necessarily imply that they disagree with the deal or want to sack public sector workers, just that they don't believe that it will last four years. Nobody believes that it will, including those in the public sector, because this government is no credibility and is not trustworthy.

- Just one-third think Eamon Gilmore would make a good Taoiseach, compared to 20% for Enda Kenny.
In other words, Gilmore is the most highly regarded of the three leaders and considerably more popular than EK. Nice spin FT :rolleyes:

- Just 23% think Labour's policies "would solve the economic turmoil", compared to 25% for Fine Gael's.

- 60% want a national-government of all parties.
These two are related. This is not a rejection of Labour's policies in particular (because FG are doing almost as badly) but the reflection of a fear that no one party is competent enough to tackle the crisis alone.

- Over two-thirds oppose raising the corporation-tax rate above its current 12.5%.
That's because it is the staple of our economy, people are obviously not going to want to raise it. AFAIK, Labour don't want to change it (I am open for correction, but only with actual evidence and not speculation or opinion).

Ultimately, raising our corporate tax means that we have to become competitive by other means, like working harder and taking home less pay. Why would Irish people vote for that?
 
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