Popular Culture?

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Interesting tirade from Mr Watson.

[video=youtube;lyLUIXWnrC0]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyLUIXWnrC0[/video]
 


gerhard dengler

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Interesting tirade from Mr Watson.

[video=youtube;lyLUIXWnrC0]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyLUIXWnrC0[/video]
I watched that the other day.

Is PJ Watson a p1sstaker? Or does he really subscribe to what he puts out in his videos?

You should see the clip he does about George Clooney and refugees.
 

GDPR

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He makes valid points however the Frankfurt School were cultural elitists who were very opposed to Jazz which they saw as barbaric coming into Germany. The thing is that "Popular Culture" doesn't actually actually come from the masses in the late capitalist mess that we live in but "brain trusts" in transnational companies that seek to degenerate and degrade the population for two reasons; one because appealing to the lowest common denominator brings in the cash and two are morally ruined population is incapable of effective rebellion.
 

McTell

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Interesting tirade from Mr Watson.

[video=youtube;lyLUIXWnrC0]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyLUIXWnrC0[/video]


Sounds like he watches too much TV...

Culture is what you choose to do, not what you watch.
 

silverharp

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I wouldn't think its a top down thing based of cultural Marxism. Culture was highbrow in the past because the audience was. As the cost of entertainment has dropped the audience are mostly the people with the least money and most time on their hands, hence the pull down to the lowest common denominator.
Also going back to the 60's-80's the culture was more conservative so being "edgy" was to go against this which was easy for an industry that attracts people that have the attention span of gold fish and all the self control of a fattie in a cake shop.
 
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Sounds like he watches too much TV...

Culture is what you choose to do, not what you watch.
I agree, but he's talking about popular culture, which is currently nourished and propagated by Television. I think it represents the pinnacle of culture in our society.

Would it be fair to see that culturally, western civilisation reached its peak in the past, perhaps 200 years ago, or can we look forward to another golden cultural era?
 
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Deleted member 45466

I watched that the other day.

Is PJ Watson a p1sstaker? Or does he really subscribe to what he puts out in his videos?

You should see the clip he does about George Clooney and refugees.
I saw the Clooney vid. I agree with everything he said.
 

Mitsui2

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Interesting tirade from Mr Watson.

[video=youtube;lyLUIXWnrC0]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyLUIXWnrC0[/video]
You could - and would have - found many people saying pretty much exactly the same things about "popular culture" in Strauss's day - "That sleazy, disgusting waltz stuff is the lowest ebb in degenerate human behaviour ever!"

And (I've absolutely no doubt) long before: -

"Why d'you waste your time painting them antelopes on the cave walls, Ug? It's downright degenerate!"

Who on earth ever said that culture was supposed to be (in Mr Watson's words) "“uplifting… (to) infuse our lives with intrigue, lust for knowledge and appreciation of beauty”?

It's not a definition of culture (popular or otherwise) that would get much traction with anthropologists. Over time and place "popular" culture has ranged from burning witches to writing poems about cherry blossoms, and taken in all conceivable points in between.

Mr Watson is a grumpy-old-man-in-training.
 

Quebecoise

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The internet has had a much more negative effect on my levels of concentration than television ever did. Television can be boring, so a lot of the time you can switch it off and do something else. But that's almost never the way with the internet. People now spend far more time in front of a screen than the time before the internet. And there's no grannies left of a particular generation who will tell you that your eyes will go square if you sit so close to a screen for so many hours a day.
 

Fr. Hank Tree

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The internet has had a much more negative effect on my levels of concentration than television ever did. Television can be boring, so a lot of the time you can switch it off and do something else. But that's almost never the way with the internet. People now spend far more time in front of a screen than the time before the internet. And there's no grannies left of a particular generation who will tell you that your eyes will go square if you sit so close to a screen for so many hours a day.
Agreed - internet is lethal. Now watching TV can actually feel like a break. TV is to internet what going out for a walk was to TV.
 
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Agreed - internet is lethal. Now watching TV can actually feel like a break. TV is to internet what going out for a walk was to TV.
Popular culture exists in spades on d'internet too. I expect d'internet to completely replace the telly box as the primary recreational activity for mass audiences.
 

Cruimh

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You could - and would have - found many people saying pretty much exactly the same things about "popular culture" in Strauss's day - "That sleazy, disgusting waltz stuff is the lowest ebb in degenerate human behaviour ever!"

And (I've absolutely no doubt) long before: -

"Why d'you waste your time painting them antelopes on the cave walls, Ug? It's downright degenerate!"

Who on earth ever said that culture was supposed to be (in Mr Watson's words) "“uplifting… (to) infuse our lives with intrigue, lust for knowledge and appreciation of beauty”?

It's not a definition of culture (popular or otherwise) that would get much traction with anthropologists. Over time and place "popular" culture has ranged from burning witches to writing poems about cherry blossoms, and taken in all conceivable points in between.

Mr Watson is a grumpy-old-man-in-training.
And it'll take weeks for BTB to recover from Hannah Montana in Orange ....
 

rainmaker

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Who on earth ever said that culture was supposed to be (in Mr Watson's words) "“uplifting… (to) infuse our lives with intrigue, lust for knowledge and appreciation of beauty”?

It's not a definition of culture (popular or otherwise) that would get much traction with anthropologists. Over time and place "popular" culture has ranged from burning witches to writing poems about cherry blossoms, and taken in all conceivable points in between
Thank you - this is exactly what I wanted to say.

Mr Watson is a grumpy-old-man-in-training.
I was going to be less diplomatic than this though.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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Who is your man? Never heard of him. Is this what alt right means? I've been listening to this for years, there are plenty of alternatives the internet is stuffed with them.


This guy;s schtik is repetitive, derivative and mainly boring claptrap.

Also complete bullshíte, this is great:

[video=youtube;eAyxmk39g3U]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eAyxmk39g3U[/video]
 

Mitsui2

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This is exactly what I wanted to say.



I was going to be less diplomatic than this though.
Oh all right, then -

He's one more in the seemingly endless line of chancers looking to build himself an online audience by mouthing a sloppy and irrational porridge of tired reactionary drivel -

Any better?

:)
 

gerhard dengler

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I wouldn't think its a top down thing based of cultural Marxism. Culture was highbrow in the past because the audience was. As the cost of entertainment has dropped the audience are mostly the people with the least money and most time on their hands, hence the pull down to the lowest common denominator.
Also going back to the 60's-80's the culture was more conservative so being "edgy" was to go against this which was easy for an industry that attracts people that have the attention span of gold fish and all the self control of a fattie in a cake shop.
Great points.

These days those who advocate "conservative" values are the "rebels".
 

sadcitizen

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I get his point of view but I don't get what he wants?

If he was an artist or a trained musician or author - or even lightly read about the progression of movements - he'd understand why we're not going to have modern movements promoting Mozart-style sonatas or Caravaggio style paintings or whatever. He'd understand this if he even just went to a few exhibition openings. I mean besides that, several of the people he mentioned (Beethoven and so on) were controversial and innovative at the time. I don't think he gets the context.

TV is more gross because networks have gotten better at assessing market demands due to technology.

He's essentially just saying "boo human nature" for 15 minutes.
 


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