Premium Rate Telephony

Deadlock

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Joined
Feb 4, 2011
Messages
6,172
No - not me, and not those kind of premium rate services.

My Mother recently subscribed to a service to be notified about offers ad deals from a well known international supermarket brand, and hit then hit roof when her mobile phone bill came it at over 2 euros per text notification.

We chased down the service provider and they've agrees to refund part of the bill as a "good faith gesture", and have emailed her a monstrous form to be filled out, looking for details such as the URL of the sign up page - details of course that she no longer has.

Has anyone out there in the P.ie community ever filled out one of those forms or know of a site that tracks the URLs of all these 'offers and deals' URLs ?
 


Orbit v2

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Dec 8, 2010
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11,797
I don't know how the operators of those scams sleep at night. They are a form of legal fraud as it's just not conceivable that people would sign up knowing what they cost.I would call comreg about it, as they are responsible for regulating this "sector".

I'd also name and shame the supermarket.
 

Deadlock

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 4, 2011
Messages
6,172
I don't know how the operators of those scams sleep at night. They are a form of legal fraud as it's just not conceivable that people would sign up knowing what they cost.I would call comreg about it, as they are responsible for regulating this "sector".

I'd also name and shame the supermarket.
We called both Eir (as the mobile service provider) and Comreg (when the premium service provider involved did not respond to our email or snail mail contact). The Eir agent was very helpful, and told us that apparently this 'premium service provider' have a very bad rep for this kind of thing, The 'premium service provider' only replied when Comreg got involved.

I'm wading through the excel form that was sent to my Mother to complete for her refund, and I swear the form is heavy going. I've spent a few hours online trying to get some indication what all the telephony jargon on the form means in the context of the services for which she was charged. Hellish.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
39,553
Some networks consider en emoji to be a text element and charge accordingly. This, despite the fact that an emoji is simply a Unicode block.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
39,553
I'd read about that and my jaw hit the floor.
I meant to say a graphic element. It's just a few characters over the network and is rendered as a tiny graphic so some networks bill it that way.
 


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