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President Higgins: Political Leader, pain in the government's behind

ShoutingIsLeadership

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Labour is a mess, but it at least left us the gift that is President Higgins.

The President has expressed his surprise that there is nothing in the programme for government, about the direct provision system.

He's also had plenty to say about the lack of State involvement in housing provision - it also draws his ire:

" He said there was an impression being created by some that tenants are “troublesome” and that “landlords must be kept happy at all costs”.
“This is all nonsense in a way. It is very understandable. But people are not moving from it in a way. How could building social houses be some sort of statism? What is wrong with a State?”

Well done, Mr. President.



President Higgins criticises lack of asylum seeker reform
 


Mitsui2

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Labour is a mess, but it at least left us the gift that is President Higgins.

The President has expressed his surprise that there is nothing in the programme for government, about the direct provision system.

He's also had plenty to say about the lack of State involvement in housing provision - it also draws his ire:

" He said there was an impression being created by some that tenants are “troublesome” and that “landlords must be kept happy at all costs”.
“This is all nonsense in a way. It is very understandable. But people are not moving from it in a way. How could building social houses be some sort of statism? What is wrong with a State?”

Well done, Mr. President.



President Higgins criticises lack of asylum seeker reform
Hush! You're not supposed to say anything good about Michael D!
 

Texal Tom

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It's easy to argue for a system that won't have any effect on you. I have lived in a housing estate which had a portion of social housing tenants - most were fine but there were a number of houses / families that had a very negative impact on the estate - drugs / anti social behaviour / children attacking and intimidating other children / lack of care for the house and lawns / refusal to pay for or take any responsibility for the upkeep of the estate .etc. This was hard on those who had paid a lot for the houses and couldn't simply move elsewhere - no doubt value of properties / people's life long efforts and savings had taken a hammering over this policy....

Higgins has people opening doors and driving him around and cooking for him - he can't really pronounce on this as he is so far removed from any consequence

Higgins is a person with limited enough abilities who trousers 5k / week - he shouts out from the steps about the poor ordinary man on the street but then jumps into his limo and heads back to the park to be served like a Lord - a fake embarrassment who should be sent out to graze with his Labour Party friends
 
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ShoutingIsLeadership

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It's easy to argue for a system that won't have any effect on you. I have lived in a housing estate which had a portion of social housing tenants - most were fine but there were a number of houses / families that had a very negative impact on the estate - drugs / anti social behaviour / children attacking and intimidating other children / lack of care for the house and lawns / refusal to pay for or take any responsibility for the upkeep of the estate .etc. This was hard on those who had paid a lot for the houses and couldn't simply move elsewhere - no doubt value of properties / people's life long efforts and savings had taken a hammering over this policy....

Higgins has people opening doors and driving him around and cooking for him - he can't really pronounce on this as he is so far removed from any consequence

Higgins is a person with limited enough abilities who trousers 5k / week - he shouts out from the steps about the poor ordinary man on the street but then jumps into his limo and heads back to the park to be served like a Lord - a fake embarrassment who should be sent out to graze with his Labour Party friends
Are ghettos the answer?
 

cyberianpan

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kmcc

It is difficult to take Higgins seriously, given that we've to pay for the pain in his behind

Cyp
 

Carlos Danger

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It's easy to argue for a system that won't have any effect on you. I have lived in a housing estate which had a portion of social housing tenants - most were fine but there were a number of houses / families that had a very negative impact on the estate - drugs / anti social behaviour / children attacking and intimidating other children / lack of care for the house and lawns / refusal to pay for or take any responsibility for the upkeep of the estate .etc. This was hard on those who had paid a lot for the houses and couldn't simply move elsewhere - no doubt value of properties / people's life long efforts and savings had taken a hammering over this policy....

Higgins has people opening doors and driving him around and cooking for him - he can't really pronounce on this as he is so far removed from any consequence

Higgins is a person with limited enough abilities who trousers 5k / week - he shouts out from the steps about the poor ordinary man on the street but then jumps into his limo and heads back to the park to be served like a Lord - a fake embarrassment who should be sent out to graze with his Labour Party friends
...and has been since the mid 1970s.
 

olli rehn

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It's easy to argue for a system that won't have any effect on you. I have lived in a housing estate which had a portion of social housing tenants - most were fine but there were a number of houses / families that had a very negative impact on the estate - drugs / anti social behaviour / children attacking and intimidating other children / lack of care for the house and lawns / refusal to pay for or take any responsibility for the upkeep of the estate .etc. This was hard on those who had paid a lot for the houses and couldn't simply move elsewhere - no doubt value of properties / people's life long efforts and savings had taken a hammering over this policy....

Higgins has people opening doors and driving him around and cooking for him - he can't really pronounce on this as he is so far removed from any consequence

Higgins is a person with limited enough abilities who trousers 5k / week - he shouts out from the steps about the poor ordinary man on the street but then jumps into his limo and heads back to the park to be served like a Lord - a fake embarrassment who should be sent out to graze with his Labour Party friends
People living in such estates can do something about antisocial behaviour in working together for the good of the place. An estate council can be set up, the guards and social workers could get involved and those quasi criminal elements ruining everything can be rooted out. If people work together towards a common goal you would not have such problems. Unfortunately it is everybody for himself/herself in many cases and people get what they allow to happen.

I suppose it is very easy to kick Michael D. around when your are anonymously behind a keyboard.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Well the part I agree with most of all in what Higgins has said is the simple question 'What is wrong with a State'?

That is a question that has me most troubled of all politically about Ireland over the last few decades. The concept of State has been under constant attack both from within and without in the gradual grind against sovereignty right through to the notion that the state is something that must be suborned towards a greater but vaguely undefined project.

Under the patronage system the state still quietly exists in the provision of comfort by the state for the cronies. But the state is not allowed to exist in the provision of social housing as that is against the new political religion.

Everything that was good about the concept of the state is under attack- from the provision of national healthcare and social housing right through to the dismissal of concern for the state as something gauche and of yesterday.

Well I agree in a broader sense with the question that Michael Higgins has posed even if he did not intend it to be interpreted as broadly.

I do not think that centralised statist economics is a good thing and particularly not where political patronage lies hidden behind the state's distribution of its income. But I am inclined to think these days a bit like Tony Benn in pondering the question of socialism and the Third Way in 1997. He said 'I did not think that there would be a lot of socialism. But a little would have been nice.'

In the same way I still think there is a role for the state in doing good for the national community and in certain ways a little bit of the state would be nice.
 

RasherHash

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People living in such estates can do something about antisocial behaviour in working together for the good of the place. An estate council can be set up, the guards and social workers could get involved and those quasi criminal elements ruining everything can be rooted out. If people work together towards a common goal you would not have such problems. Unfortunately it is everybody for himself/herself in many cases and people get what they allow to happen.

I suppose it is very easy to kick Michael D. around when your are anonymously behind a keyboard.
When you take €300,000 of taxpayers hard earned cash you should be kicked around regularly.
 

Dr Pat

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Higgins is a pompous git with a narcissistic bent whose pronouncements from the high office of the Presidency to the real 'little people' of Ireland i.e. the ordinary Joe and Josie taxpayer, are tainted by the tiresome and staid 'morality' of the smoked salmon socialist variety that is the hallmark of his tenure of office.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Brave new world where socialism is now the preferred system of the rich and capitalism is presented as the saviour of the poor.

Socialism used to be criticised as a way of distributing wealth to the undeserving citizen and in a way it still is even if the citizen concerned these days is more likely to have an offshore bank account than dreams of a bicycle.

And the citizen without the offshore bank account must tally up what he can afford even when it comes to the basic human needs of food and shelter against the principles of capitalism.

Socialism and capitalism have become reversed. The poor are now more pre-occupied by capitalism than ever and the wealthy go foxhunting for the next state handout.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Even in the law it appears that the wealthy can access legal aid far easier than the fellow off the sink estate can access the principle of a good name.

Such a series of strangely apposite principles that exist these days. Ireland's wealthy can depend upon the state whereas the less fortunate are left to state their dependence.

Being known to the gardai is regarded as a bad thing when you are poor whereas every guard can read about the lives of the wealthy without just cause in the national newspapers with no accumulated negativity for the wealthy citizen involved.

Paradox Island. Where the trick is to buy to let and the rest left only dreaming of ever buying. A whimsical place made dreamy by policy.
 
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GDPR

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Social housing mixed to private is a no brainers compared to creating new ghettos or making worse ones that exist. I live in one with a mix of social and affordable houses along with private and it's works fine. Re social houses given by the developers to the Council, the developers get paid what it cost them for that house. Those tenants placed in them from housing lists pay rent to the Council at a subsidised rate applicable to that person or family.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
I will declare against stiff opposition my candidacy for the presidency as it is the only office where I can say what I really feel and be totally confident that I will be roundly ignored.

You can never accuse the Irish presidency of irresponsibility without being reminded fairly quickly that the President is responsible for nothing anyway so there is job security in it and a gain in self-assurance for the holder of that office.

It must be glorious in a way to righteously attempt to speak truth to power when there was never any danger of power listening in the slightest. And then to achieve an office in the land where you have the lifestyle of power and the gorgeous self-indulgence of being able to have dinner alongside the power while having the luxury over the mints to be able to remark on the truth.

If I am President my policy will at least once a week to tell the truth to the nation. Week one will be the comment 'That O'Brien fellow seems to me to be expensively paranoid. He may well be right to spend all that money to hide from us the suspicions about himself as an Irishman. Think how it must be for his wife- a sort of Diana stuck in a three cornered marriage with Denis- and his lawyer dressed up in the corner like Camilla '.

I would undertake to attend no functions thrown by the government for objectionable people such as the Israelis. Or representatives of Mad Mullah states. Bollocks to the bowls of shamrock.

I'd do something useful like grabbing twenty minutes off've RTE to read a bedtime story on the national airwaves at about eight o'clock in the evenings on radio and television so the little sods would go to sleep and the parents would get a bit of peace and quiet. And with that I'd immediately be the most useful Irish president to have ever served.

Beat that. Also I'd use public transport and halve the salary or cap it and put the excess towards something useful in the state like penny dinners.
 
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Diawlbach

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Micky D is a bit like an exiled leader, the true leader denied his following by presidential protocol....a man lost up his own áras.
He is actively engaging specific political lobbying here on what should be in a program for government. Whether you agree or not, that is not his job. He is required not to do this.

His wife was entitled to do this. He ain't. He is waaaay out of line here.
 

Texal Tom

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People living in such estates can do something about antisocial behaviour in working together for the good of the place. An estate council can be set up, the guards and social workers could get involved and those quasi criminal elements ruining everything can be rooted out. If people work together towards a common goal you would not have such problems. Unfortunately it is everybody for himself/herself in many cases and people get what they allow to happen.

I suppose it is very easy to kick Michael D. around when your are anonymously behind a keyboard.
In the estate tut I lived in we had a drug dealer - constant flow of taxis and folk wandering into a house and then after a few mins back out. We found used needles on the green where the children played. I phone the Gardai many times and even went into meet the community Garda. We will patrol the area more often was the response - I didn't notice any increase in Garda presence - I do know the the dealer continued - it only stopped when there was a big fued among the dealers and he cleared out very fast.

I think the problem with social housing in the past is that they were too big. Small developments and more effective tenancy agreements which are enforced. In the housing estate that I lived in all the problem houses were council - I notivpced too that all the council clients were moved in when all the houses were sold. I thought that that was sneaky at the time.

its very easy to agree with a policy of social housing but if you have to live with the consequences of this it is very different. And as I said above many of the council tenants were fine but even a few families could really have a detrimental effect
 

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