Pringle posters appearing in Co.Tyrone



enuffisenuff

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a publicity stunt
 

Sync

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He seems particularly stupid.
 

locke

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If there is any offence being committed, it's under Northern Ireland law, so it doesn't really have any implications for Pringle. As there's no election in NI, it's really just any old poster and the only person who can get in trouble is the person putting them up.
 

Rural

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The agency or agencies who are employed at the moment to erect the posters for the two largest parties seem to be taking the piss.

A Fine Gael poster had to be removed in Limerick as it was covering a sign directing patients to the Breast Check Clinic.

And this is how Frank O'Rourke's (FF) posters were erected on a lamp post in Co. Kildare. And if anyone says this is necessary, no it's not, it's overkill to the point of stupidity.

Posters.gif
 

Rural

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Regarding the OP -


9 towns in Donegal are "Poster Free Zones" - So, I suppose if you have a glut of posters, you have to put them somewhere. :)
 

CatullusV

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Regarding the OP -


9 towns in Donegal are "Poster Free Zones" - So, I suppose if you have a glut of posters, you have to put them somewhere. :)
It always come up at election time, but posters are a real issue. They are eyesore, involve risk to put up and to take down. The fall down or are sometimes ripped down, forming huge litter. They are not exactly good for the environment and cannot be cheap.

The system here is different. Outside polling stations galvanized metal hoardings are erected a couple of weeks before the election. Each candidate is allocated an A3 sized space on it. That is theirs and theirs alone. The day after the vote these temporary hoardings are removed by the mairie for cleaning - at the candidates' expense. They can then be reused at the next election.

The problem, I guess, is that it might be seen by the bigger parties to favour the smaller parties in the sense that it makes the costs minimal across the board.
 

Rural

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It always come up at election time, but posters are a real issue. They are eyesore, involve risk to put up and to take down. The fall down or are sometimes ripped down, forming huge litter. They are not exactly good for the environment and cannot be cheap.

The system here is different. Outside polling stations galvanized metal hoardings are erected a couple of weeks before the election. Each candidate is allocated an A3 sized space on it. That is theirs and theirs alone. The day after the vote these temporary hoardings are removed by the mairie for cleaning - at the candidates' expense. They can then be reused at the next election.

The problem, I guess, is that it might be seen by the bigger parties to favour the smaller parties in the sense that it makes the costs minimal across the board.
They shouldn't be used at all in this day and age, simply for environmental and health and safety reasons.

We used to end up with at least one of them in our garden at every election or referendum and then (we felt) it was up to us to dispose of it.

I don't know about anyone else, but posters never influenced the way I voted.
 

recedite

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If the law is the same in Northern Ireland as it is in Wales (& it probably is) the answer is probably yes.
Answer is probably No, because AFAIK (in RoI anyway) election posters are temporarily exempt from the litter laws for a short period before and after the election. Which is why they have to take them down afterwards, to avoid being fined. But if no election, then no exemption.
 

petaljam

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Answer is probably No, because AFAIK (in RoI anyway) election posters are temporarily exempt from the litter laws for a short period before and after the election. Which is why they have to take them down afterwards, to avoid being fined. But if no election, then no exemption.
That's certainly how it should be. And yet when I was in Derry at Christmas, there were a number of posters still left up after the Dec 12th general election. Infuriating.
 

recedite

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That's certainly how it should be. And yet when I was in Derry at Christmas, there were a number of posters still left up after the Dec 12th general election. Infuriating.
Well possibly its a certain number of working days, excluding holidays, I don't know exactly. But if they were still up in January that would definitely be too long.
 

Mickeymac

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That's certainly how it should be. And yet when I was in Derry at Christmas, there were a number of posters still left up after the Dec 12th general election. Infuriating.


Had a link PJ to those posters, not only in Doire, but, across areas of the six counties, decided though, not to post it as I read the OP and decided it was "off topic" if you get my drift.;)
 

Mickeymac

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Well possibly its a certain number of working days, excluding holidays, I don't know exactly. But if they were still up in January that would definitely be too long.


Taking them down after the Dec election would have been rather stupid considering the fact it was widely thought the British SoS was expected to call elections to the power sharing executive a few weeks ago.
 

Cai

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Taking them down after the Dec election would have been rather stupid considering the fact it was widely thought the British SoS was expected to call elections to the power sharing executive a few weeks ago.
They’d have to be different posters - for a variety of reasons.
 

Cai

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Not necessarily pal, Union Jacks and Loyalist death squad killer flags fly there 24/7/365...….got it?
There are legal requirements for election posters in the UK - the name of the agent of the candidate has to be visible on the poster - & all other election materials.

There’s also the fairly obvious point that the candidates for Stormont & Westminster are different - so you need different posters for both sets of canddates.
 


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