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Private school with €1m debts goes bust

Aindriu

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THE High Court has appointed a liquidator to a private school in Dublin after a judge heard it could not survive as a going concern.
Ms Justice Mary Laffoy appointed Brian Hyland as liquidator of Ashfield College Ltd, Templeogue, which charged €6,950 in annual fees for students taking seven subjects in the Leaving Cert.
The judge was told the private college, which had approximately 100 students, 43 teaching staff and three administrative staff, has a deficit of €1.1m and is insolvent. It does not have the funds to meet its liabilities.

Now even the private schools are being hit. Full story here.
 


Furze

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More pseudo private sector nonsense.
That student teacher ratio is ridiculous.
Taxpayer to pick up losses.
 

Supermanpolitician

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That's less than 2.2 teachers per student on average. Every student should be getting 600 points with that kind of tuition.
 

Aindriu

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That's less than 2.2 teachers per student on average. Every student should be getting 600 points with that kind of tuition.
That is one reason why private schools generally get better results in exams.
 

loaded32

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THE High Court has appointed a liquidator to a private school in Dublin after a judge heard it could not survive as a going concern.
Ms Justice Mary Laffoy appointed Brian Hyland as liquidator of Ashfield College Ltd, Templeogue, which charged €6,950 in annual fees for students taking seven subjects in the Leaving Cert.
The judge was told the private college, which had approximately 100 students, 43 teaching staff and three administrative staff, has a deficit of €1.1m and is insolvent. It does not have the funds to meet its liabilities.

Now even the private schools are being hit. Full story here.
Good!
 

HanleyS

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More pseudo private sector nonsense.
That student teacher ratio is ridiculous.
Taxpayer to pick up losses.
Not only is it ridiculous, it's nonsense. Ashfield runs part-time and evening courses too. It has far more than 100 pupils and it doesn't say whether the teachers are full-time or not. The figures are incorrect.
 

current observer

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Cutback in teacher numbers in Fee Paying schools and the closure of some Private/Grind schools should dilute some of a perceived advantage gained through a Private Second Level Education. In some respect this improves the Equality within the system but will place additional pressures on funding the 'Free' Second Level sector.
 

toughbutfair

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people with money will always find advantages for their children - human nature. So many students were getting grinds during the boom. I didn't even have a book throughout the whole of University (just used lecture notes):D

If a child is smart they'll succeed no matter what school they go to.
 

ajax1000

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people with money will always find advantages for their children - human nature. So many students were getting grinds during the boom. I didn't even have a book throughout the whole of University (just used lecture notes):D

If a child is smart they'll succeed no matter what school they go to.
That is true but it is at the margins that grinds can make a very big difference. A good tutor can help a student get that extra grade.

I see nothing wrong with it myself.
 

toughbutfair

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That is true but it is at the margins that grinds can make a very big difference. A good tutor can help a student get that extra grade.

I see nothing wrong with it myself.
I agree with you. It does give the child of parents with money an advantage but that is life - you can hardly make grinds illegal.

My nephew is starting secondary school in England and my sister was concerned about the knackers starting there and what percentage of pupils go to university. The principal basically said they can tell the good kids at that age and they put them into different classes and they are generally on a different stream to the ones that are statistically likeley to drop out after O levels (16 years old)
 

CookieMonster

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I'm feeling particularly indifferent about this news. Sad for the staff to lose their jobs though.
 

jimboconnolly

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I thought private education was meant to offer higher standards due to smaller teacher pupil ratios etc. I'm just glad I didn't pay to do my Maths or Business studies courses there.
 

Fluter

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There were probably too many schools in Dublin offering Leaving Cert/repeat/grind facilities and now there is a 'readjustment' as Fianna Fail might say
 

Furze

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That is true but it is at the margins that grinds can make a very big difference. A good tutor can help a student get that extra grade.

I see nothing wrong with it myself.
But, these students are batting above their natural ability and tend to disappoint in 3rd level.
 

ajax1000

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But, these students are batting above their natural ability and tend to disappoint in 3rd level.[/QUOTE

If a student wants to study medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine , engineering, phsyio or a host of other third level qualifications, the key is entry into colege.

Thereafter, the grade is not as important. Entry is key.

A good grind teacher can pull someone at C grade to B grade in maths or indeed any of the sciences.
 

Pythagoras

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More grind schools

I have heard the following:

Ashfield College has gone into liquidation. The Ormonde Institute are leasing the Ashfield premises which are owned by a separate company. They are gutting the building and opening in September as a second level school bringing back many of its fifth years who were making alternative arrangements.

Independent Colleges which run third level courses are next September running second level grinds.

So this recession is now seeing a rise in these types of schools. Hard to explain!
 
H

Heorditas

If a student wants to study medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine , engineering, phsyio or a host of other third level qualifications, the key is entry into colege.

Utter nonsense regarding engineering. The hard work is only beginning once someone leave school to study engineering in university. There's another massive step up in difficulty compared to the Leaving Cert.
You can get dragged through the LC to get the points to do engineering but you sure as heck won't get dragged through engineering in the same way.
 

atlantic

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ONQ

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But, these students are batting above their natural ability and tend to disappoint in 3rd level.[/QUOTE

If a student wants to study medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine , engineering, phsyio or a host of other third level qualifications, the key is entry into colege.

Thereafter, the grade is not as important. Entry is key.

A good grind teacher can pull someone at C grade to B grade in maths or indeed any of the sciences.
Ancient post I know, but I couldn't stand to see this left relatively unchallenged.
The post I am replying to seems to come from someone who didn't attend 3rd level to to a 4 or 5 year degree course.

Getting in the door only allows you to see the mountain you have to climb, personally and academically, to succeed in qualifying from a third level course.

There are many drop outs in first year of a degree course because the teaching pressure is off and you have to motivate yourself to do the work in an unfamilar social/peer environment.

The reast is blood, sweat and tears.
 


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