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Private schools should pay their own way


thetruthsback

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
2,072
At a time of economic meltdown, is it time the government stopped bankrolling these elitist institutions????
 


eoghanacht

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Joined
Apr 18, 2006
Messages
33,300
Where would they send their kids?

You hardly expect the Clongowes and Blackrock boys to mix with the serfs.
 

Cunctator

Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2009
Messages
20
Eh...Very few true private schools are actually in existence...most are simply fee paying i.e fees are paid but most teachers remain public servants.
 

jimmyfour

Active member
Joined
Oct 10, 2007
Messages
195
At a time of economic meltdown, is it time the government stopped bankrolling these elitist institutions????
The government is only paying the teachers wages which are the same for every school, and is a right for every child in the country.

The parents are paying for the facilities.
 

Red_93

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Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Messages
4,678
Apparently most private schools have teachers who are paid by the government, but do not receive a capitation grant.
 

eoinod

Active member
Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
261
Eh... you do realise that this system saves the state huge amounts of money?

The vast majority of parents who send children could not afford to do so if their schools became truly "private" which would mean that these children would have to be accomadated by the state run schools at massive cost to the state.
 

bormotello

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Joined
Aug 8, 2008
Messages
12,201
Eh... you do realise that this system saves the state huge amounts of money?

The vast majority of parents who send children could not afford to do so if their schools became truly "private" which would mean that these children would have to be accomadated by the state run schools at massive cost to the state.
It will make more sense to pay wages to builders rather then keep them on welfare
 

MPB

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Joined
Nov 27, 2009
Messages
4,465
At a time of economic meltdown, is it time the government stopped bankrolling these elitist institutions????
But if we had no private schools where would we get all our world class civil servants.

Where would little old Ireland be without these super educated toffs.
 

rubensni

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Joined
Apr 27, 2009
Messages
737
Eh... you do realise that this system saves the state huge amounts of money?

The vast majority of parents who send children could not afford to do so if their schools became truly "private" which would mean that these children would have to be accomadated by the state run schools at massive cost to the state.
Nonsense. The biggest expense for schools is wages.
 

GDPR

1
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Messages
222,748
Eh... you do realise that this system saves the state huge amounts of money?

The vast majority of parents who send children could not afford to do so if their schools became truly "private" which would mean that these children would have to be accomadated by the state run schools at massive cost to the state.
At very little extra cost to the state, we're already paying for the teachers anyway.

Yes, private schools should be banned. If you're in favour of equal opportunity then an equal start is the only way to go.
Will we ever do it? Not so long as Ross O'Carroll Kelly draws his Blackrock breath.

All those who have enjoyed the advantage know its worth, it will be from their cold dead hands that you wrestle that advantage from them before they pass it on to their kids.
 

rubensni

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Apr 27, 2009
Messages
737
The government is only paying the teachers wages which are the same for every school, and is a right for every child in the country.

The parents are paying for the facilities.
Ah but that's not true either as the state only covers the wages for the "legacy" private schools, particularly those affiliated with religions. The so-called grind schools (The Institute of Education in Dublin and the Tutorial Centre in Limerick) don't get a cent from the state for teacher's wages, or anything else for that matter.

And plenty of public schools look for a voluntary contribution of a couple of hundred euros off parents for upkeep of facilities, etc.
 

rubensni

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 27, 2009
Messages
737
No it is not.
How did you come to that conclusion? In the United States, teachers' wages on average amount to 70% of a typical school's budget.
 

ellie08

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Joined
Nov 2, 2008
Messages
12,550
Ah but that's not true either as the state only covers the wages for the "legacy" private schools, particularly those affiliated with religions. The so-called grind schools (The Institute of Education in Dublin and the Tutorial Centre in Limerick) don't get a cent from the state for teacher's wages, or anything else for that matter.

And plenty of public schools look for a voluntary contribution of a couple of hundred euros off parents for upkeep of facilities, etc.
Bruce and tutorial don't always employ properly trained teachers. I know I went to one of those schools! We had a guy for history that had done an arts degree (though he was quite good).
 

Limerick Lad

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Joined
Nov 17, 2006
Messages
4,609
Bruce and tutorial don't always employ properly trained teachers. I know I went to one of those schools! We had a guy for history that had done an arts degree (though he was quite good).
A primary degree such as an Arts degree along with Higher Diploma in Education is the qualification required to become a teacher in a secondary school, presumably history was one of the subjects this teacher pursued while studying for his Arts degree.
 

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