Prominent Lecturer Jailed for 12 Years for Sex Abuse

Old Mr Grouser

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Jeepers Grouser, I and many of my pals have been so drunk, we had to be drunk to feel sober, but we never fingered, buggered or got sexy time with kids.

I'm being desperately unliked and told to piss off on this thread for pointing out the man was someone with power, status and authority, and although the signs were there, no one would act on them - because he was a big deal.

It really is that simple.
No. It's not simple.

Just as you'd always yourself why a man would want to be a priest - or a policeman or a gynaecologist - you need to be asking yourself why a man (or woman) would give his time to youth work. And in the background checks and the positive vetting a fondness for alcohol has to count as a very substantial risk factor.

It really is the nice ones that you need to watch - they're the ones who are likely to think that they can get way with it.
 
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GDPR

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No. It's not simple.

Just as you'd always yourself why a man would want to be a priest - or a policeman or a gynaecologist - you need to be asking yourself why a man (or woman) would give his time to youth work. And in the background checks and the positive vetting a fondness for alcohol has to count as a very substantial risk factor.

It really is the nice ones that you need to watch - they're the ones who re likely to think that they can get way with it.
Balls, This guy wasn't someone hanging around junior football clubs, offering to coach them. He was a big legal noise, author of a set text book, well plugged into the establishment, I bet all his students licked his boots.

He could ramble on openly about paedophilia, and everyone would just nod and ignore it. Big fat deal, Important man, someone you wanted to be on the right side of.

Eccentric, charming, pushing the envelope, etc etc

He relied on his power and status to protect him, and he laughed, literally wet himself at the fact that he could get away with it.
 

Old Mr Grouser

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Balls, This guy wasn't someone hanging around junior football clubs, offering to coach them. He was a big legal noise, author of a set text book, well plugged into the establishment, I bet all his students licked his boots.

He could ramble on openly about paedophilia, and everyone would just nod and ignore it. Big fat deal, Important man, someone you wanted to be on the right side of.

Eccentric, charming, pushing the envelope, etc etc

He relied on his power and status to protect him, and he laughed, literally wet himself at the fact that he could get away with it.
From what I've seen of it - which isn't a lot , but in my time I've come across a few of them - they're likeable extroverts with charisma. Very often they had had status, but not always; one I knew was still a young man and he'd had been a shelf-stacker in a supermarket.

But they were all men that were smart and intelligent with a lot of personality.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
I honestly don't understand where this impulse comes from. For years I assumed these people were as rare as serial killers. Possibly because anything I had read of the police interactions with them came back with definite similarities in psychology- the most noticeable being an inability to emphathise with others.

I have an inkling of a theory that clerical predators have definite influences on them- a lack of normal socialisation as children (possibly a pointer to the underdevelopment or lack of development of empathy), an intense narcissism which is noticeable in many cases in the adult psychological profile and a distorted or arrested adolescence. A fear of normal adult human relationships. All these things are powerful dynamics and I can understand how a monster can be created by them.

I wonder though how a person can have their sexuality and psychology distorted so much that they see sexual predation on children as some kind of impulse.

There must be some common thread in development that produces these distorted humans.

I wonder is the paedophilia a mixture of distorted development in the child/adolescent.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
I recall hearing of the raid and the disappearance of Jarvis into police custody. I have never encountered or had never heard of the man before but then there are hundreds of professors at Cambridge and on balance there are always likely to be some dark sorts among such a large population of academics.

It just shows that education is not a ward against such horrible impulses. Indeed I used to wonder at the number of judges, lawyers and police, always people regarded as being in authoritative roles who are discovered to be involved in such vile activities.
 
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Analyzer

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Well that should serve as a lesson. Pun fully intended.
 

damus

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There's no national paedophile treatment programme in Ireland. Paedophiles who are convicted of crimes against children can avail of counselling in prison. But there's no treatment or help for paedophiles seeking help to control their urges.
 

Herr Rommel

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No. It's not simple.

Just as you'd always yourself why a man would want to be a priest - or a policeman or a gynaecologist - you need to be asking yourself why a man (or woman) would give his time to youth work. And in the background checks and the positive vetting a fondness for alcohol has to count as a very substantial risk factor.

It really is the nice ones that you need to watch - they're the ones who are likely to think that they can get way with it.
Congratulations on tarring single people who are involved in sporting organisation up and down the country with the one brush.
 

users

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He's likely in one of our more relaxed and comfortable prisons living the life of an intellectual.
I'd like to see him spend his days moving a pile of stones from one place to another and then back again the next day.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Agree we should not discourage people from being active in these areas but it is just that everyone involved should be on their guard in the knowledge that the distorted will seek out such situations and that matters should be arranged so as to preclude any possibility of wrong-doing and in fairness make sure there is a safe and supervised environment for children and a system in place that provides confidence in and for the adults involved.

As ever the rule should be think the best and guard against the possibility of the worst. Adults can also then feel safe that they won't find themselves accused in error which is the worst sort of thing that could happen to the well intentioned.
 

Finbar10

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Here is another IT piece on the story, this time featuring one of his victims who bravely went public.

An aspect of the story that amazes me though is how Doolan was allowed by the Adoption Board to adopt a child from abroad when seemingly he had already exhibited some questionable behaviour.

Back in the 1990s Doolan also became one of the first single men in the State to adopt a child from abroad, a baby boy from eastern Europe who is now an adult.
IMO a single man want deserves a much harder look with respect to suitability (unless perhaps it's an uncle willing to take in orphaned nephews or nieces).

But even before he adopted:

Gardaí believed that at the time, in 1984, he planned to travel to Asia and acquire a baby on the black market, though he never went through with the plan.

Reliable Garda sources said he regretted using his own name when registering the bogus home birth for a child who never existed and decided against persisting with his plans.
And it seemed he was already abusing:

When he later adopted legally, an acquaintance who knew he was a sexual abuser went to Dublin Airport to try to convince him not to leave the country to collect the child.
On surface appearances, I suppose he appeared impressive, rather the pillar of the community as a senior published law lecturer and former barrister (probably blinded his assessors enough to get them to overlook his unusual circumstances as a single man looking to adopt and not ask too many questions about his background). Still, you'd wonder why they seemingly didn't poke around in his background a bit more.
 

Emily Davison

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It's always the nice one's you need to watch

Going back 20 years or so, when I was RC, I had some dealings with Fr Kit Cunnngham - he was the editor of the diocesan newspaper - and I formed a very high opinion of him.

But voluntary youth-leaders, Scout Leaders in particular, are high-risk. A lot more should be done along the lines of background-checks and 'positive vetting', particularly in regard to their drinking; drunkenness is very often involved in these awful situations.

I agree with some of what you say particularly about it being the nice ones. It's not true to say we must suspect all youth leaders. But it would be logically to conclude that if one were a paedophile then naturally you're going to involve yourself in areas of opportunity of access.

In relation to vetting, I've literally zero faith in this procedure. In fact it only leads to putting off the right people volunteering, and to upsetting people being vetted, plus it puts the idea of untowardess out front. In any case what exactly does vetting achieve. Yippy I've a certificate I'm not a paedophile. It's also a nonsense way for society to say look here, we vetted, so let's all assume everything is ok.

It's not ok, that's a false sense of security. We just must be aware of real life of where our children are and must make sure our children know to cone to us if anything bad happens or if they suspect something.
 
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Sister Mercedes

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Did anyone reading that article get any sense the authorities had made any effort to find other victims? I didn't.
 

users

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I agree with some of what you say particularly about it being the nice ones. It's not true to say we must suspect all youth leaders. But it would be logically tom ncluded tgat if one were a paedophile then naturally you're going to involve yourself in areas of opportunity of access.
It's not always the 'nice' ones, it's also the bullies, people who know how the system works and are able to get their way as a result of it including by intimidating others into silence with threats of legal action.
 

Emily Davison

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I honestly don't understand where this impulse comes from. For years I assumed these people were as rare as serial killers. Possibly because anything I had read of the police interactions with them came back with definite similarities in psychology- the most noticeable being an inability to emphathise with others.

I have an inkling of a theory that clerical predators have definite influences on them- a lack of normal socialisation as children (possibly a pointer to the underdevelopment or lack of development of empathy), an intense narcissism which is noticeable in many cases in the adult psychological profile and a distorted or arrested adolescence. A fear of normal adult human relationships. All these things are powerful dynamics and I can understand how a monster can be created by them.

I wonder though how a person can have their sexuality and psychology distorted so much that they see sexual predation on children as some kind of impulse.

There must be some common thread in development that produces these distorted humans.

I wonder is the paedophilia a mixture of distorted development in the child/adolescent.
Is it impulse?

Is it distortion?
 

Emily Davison

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It's not always the 'nice' ones, it's also the bullies, people who know how the system works and are able to get their way as a result of it including by intimidating others into silence with threats of legal action.
Yes but you can generally spot a bully. What I mean by nice is that a lot of people believe that paedophiles look like monsters and act accordingly, whereas they are the loving kind helpful uncle, for example.

I'd be hard pressed to see how a bully could use legal threats on someone in our modern world though.
 


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