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Pronunciation:


former wesleyan

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A piece on the News at One reminded me of something I've wondered about. The newscaster said that a hoard of coins had been " unearth-éd ". Many other words ending in -ed are also pronounced in this way "down here " !!! :)

Is this linguistic quirk Elizabethan, Williamite ??
 
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zakalwe1

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i also hate the way they pronounce "finance"...as in "the minister for fin-aaaahnce today said...."
 

chriskavo

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Would "un bleedin earthed" sound better to you? :D
 
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Something I noticed when I was living in Ireland was how several RTE news presenters would talk of the 'cawwwwst of living'. And 'datta' for 'data'. And putting the stress on the first syllable for 'research'. And saying 'peace prawcess' rather than prohcess.

And why does everyone now say 'Dor-sett' (stress on second syllable) Street', when Dubs of old said it the proper way?

Why, in short, the Americanization?

Give me an hour and I'll have many more examples...
 

Mr. Bumble

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Dunno if this helps, but there was a programme about English and its history on BBC about ten years ago. Cork featured in it because of the accent and the way certain words are pronounced. In particular, how words like meat, beat, and heat were pronounced mate, bate and hate. The programme concluded that this was Elizabethan pronunciation that had survived. Very interesting programme as I recall, if you managed to dig it up.
 

vladimir

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Something I noticed when I was living in Ireland was how several RTE news presenters would talk of the 'cawwwwst of living'. And 'datta' for 'data'. And putting the stress on the first syllable for 'research'. And saying 'peace prawcess' rather than prohcess.

And why does everyone now say 'Dor-sett' (stress on second syllable) Street', when Dubs of old said it the proper way?

Why, in short, the Americanization?

Give me an hour and I'll have many more examples...
Americanisation?
 

livingstone

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Something I noticed when I was living in Ireland was how several RTE news presenters would talk of the 'cawwwwst of living'. And 'datta' for 'data'. And putting the stress on the first syllable for 'research'. And saying 'peace prawcess' rather than prohcess.
I pronounce data as dah-ta - in my experience it's more Australian than American - any Americans I've dealt with pronounce it daydta.
 

former wesleyan

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Limerick Lad

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The pronunciation of the letter R as "or" rather than "are" always bothers me.
 

zakalwe1

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wait 20 years and the news will sound as follows:

"so, the min fin was so, like, "omg i'm outta here" to the other EU ministers and they were so, like, "l8trs!"...so like lame. i was saying to jessica at the break there that his tie was so like hideous...lols all round"
 

livingstone

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Unearthed. As in " unearth-de " , but only two syllables obviously.
I don't see the logic in that.

Surely it should follow any other word ending in -ed where the main original word ends in a t/th/d sound. Draft-ed, found-ed etc. The difficulty in distinguishing past tense from present tense where, in effect, you're adding a 'd' sound to a word ending in d/t anyway means that it makes more sense to add the extra syllable?
 

ScreeOrTalus

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When English people pronounce 'sixth" as sikth. :mad:
 

Podolski1.5

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Newsreader Michael Murphy and his "gorda" is one of the most annoying ones. And people who say "I sent you a tex" or "I texed you"
 

Limerick Lad

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I'm not bothered by that, I think that actually is a proper pronunciation in Ireland - certainly my rural west of Ireland (and extremely old-fashioned) father would pronounce it that way always, having done so since the 1930s.
The fact that generally Irish people pronounce R as "or" rather than "are" does not make it the proper pronunciation, it's just an Irish idiosyncrasy.
 

gatsbygirl20

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Irish people love the two syllables (from the influence of native Irish and its accent)

Hence you have "fill-um" for "film"

And "un-earth-thed" not "un-earth'd"

We don't swallow the last syllable the way the English do--part of their aristocratic, can't-be-bothered, upper-class English drawl
 
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The fact that generally Irish people pronounce R as "or" rather than "are" does not make it the proper pronunciation, it's just an Irish idiosyncrasy.
Well no, there is no reason that the English pronunciation should necessarily be adopted - the Latin alphabet was employed in Ireland while the English were still running around Germany chopping each other's heads off. It might be a remnant of Gaelic pronunciation, and nothing wrong with that at all.
 

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