Proposal for Social and Affordable Housing - Damastown Village

making waves

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The reliance of the government on the 'market' and the whims of developers and speculators to solve the housing crisis has been an abject failure. At the same time local councils are hiving off council owned land to speculators and developers at knockdown prices and in the process creating the potential for massive profits out of the housing crisis. There is a widespread need for the development of social and affordable housing.

Despite the fact that there are over 7,000 families on the housing waiting list in Dublin 15, Fingal council built a total of 12 homes in the area last year. Solidarity public representatives in Dublin 15 have put forward a plan for the development of social and affordable community in Damastown Village, north of Mulhuddart. Over the coming weeks Solidarity will be launching a public campaign in Dublin 15 to force the council and the government to act on these proposals.

The proposal outlines the development of social and affordable housing involving -

835 houses
300 apartments

these would include

78 four-beds
413 three-beds
550 two-beds
94 one bed

Half of the homes would be social housing and the remainder affordable homes.

The plan includes reserving 20% of the land as open space, a new linear landscaped park along the Pinkeen River valley, a new Community Centre and Youth Social Centre, shops, cafes and creche facilities, with 50 acres set aside for schools and additional community facilities.

The total cost of the development is €174million. Half will be funded through an affordable mortgage scheme (repayments would range from €478 per month for a one-bed up to €800 for a four bed). The remainder of the funding would come from the Fingal Council's Capital Budget (€41million), A Housing Finance Agency loan (€10million) and Dept of Environment investment (€36million).

[video=youtube;nlkipXgHK3E]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlkipXgHK3E[/video]
 


mr_anderson

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The reliance of the government on the 'market' and the whims of developers and speculators to solve the housing crisis has been an abject failure.

Stop taxing the fúck out of it !
Taxes, charges, levies, VAT etc have made it unaffordable.
The market works very efficiently when it's left alone.
 

LooseCannon

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That could work in Fingal, it has a history of progressive urban planning

Previously they had higher construction standards than national requirement (that was driven by Lab / left / Green)
 

Niall996

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The reliance of the government on the 'market' and the whims of developers and speculators to solve the housing crisis has been an abject failure. At the same time local councils are hiving off council owned land to speculators and developers at knockdown prices and in the process creating the potential for massive profits out of the housing crisis. There is a widespread need for the development of social and affordable housing.

Despite the fact that there are over 7,000 families on the housing waiting list in Dublin 15, Fingal council built a total of 12 homes in the area last year. Solidarity public representatives in Dublin 15 have put forward a plan for the development of social and affordable community in Damastown Village, north of Mulhuddart. Over the coming weeks Solidarity will be launching a public campaign in Dublin 15 to force the council and the government to act on these proposals.

The proposal outlines the development of social and affordable housing involving -

835 houses
300 apartments

these would include

78 four-beds
413 three-beds
550 two-beds
94 one bed

Half of the homes would be social housing and the remainder affordable homes.

The plan includes reserving 20% of the land as open space, a new linear landscaped park along the Pinkeen River valley, a new Community Centre and Youth Social Centre, shops, cafes and creche facilities, with 50 acres set aside for schools and additional community facilities.

The total cost of the development is €174million. Half will be funded through an affordable mortgage scheme (repayments would range from €478 per month for a one-bed up to €800 for a four bed). The remainder of the funding would come from the Fingal Council's Capital Budget (€41million), A Housing Finance Agency loan (€10million) and Dept of Environment investment (€36million).

[video=youtube;nlkipXgHK3E]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlkipXgHK3E[/video]
Why more houses than apartments when families are downsizing and we actually have an excess of three/four bedrooms and a far more critical deficiency in apartments?
 

Catalpast

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25,560
What is the eligibility to purchase/rent one of these units?

Surely those longest on the Housing List

- should be the 1st to be offered one?

PS Seen Ruth's posters plastered all over the place on this BTW
 

stopdoingstuff

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Feb 26, 2011
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22,399
Fundamentally land is over valued. That's what it all comes down to and no long term solution is possible with a significant reduction in the value of land.
 
Last edited:

lostexpectation

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The reliance of the government on the 'market' and the whims of developers and speculators to solve the housing crisis has been an abject failure. At the same time local councils are hiving off council owned land to speculators and developers at knockdown prices and in the process creating the potential for massive profits out of the housing crisis. There is a widespread need for the development of social and affordable housing.

Despite the fact that there are over 7,000 families on the housing waiting list in Dublin 15, Fingal council built a total of 12 homes in the area last year. Solidarity public representatives in Dublin 15 have put forward a plan for the development of social and affordable community in Damastown Village, north of Mulhuddart. Over the coming weeks Solidarity will be launching a public campaign in Dublin 15 to force the council and the government to act on these proposals.

The proposal outlines the development of social and affordable housing involving -

835 houses
300 apartments

these would include

78 four-beds
413 three-beds
550 two-beds
94 one bed

Half of the homes would be social housing and the remainder affordable homes.

The plan includes reserving 20% of the land as open space, a new linear landscaped park along the Pinkeen River valley, a new Community Centre and Youth Social Centre, shops, cafes and creche facilities, with 50 acres set aside for schools and additional community facilities.

The total cost of the development is €174million. Half will be funded through an affordable mortgage scheme (repayments would range from €478 per month for a one-bed up to €800 for a four bed). The remainder of the funding would come from the Fingal Council's Capital Budget (€41million), A Housing Finance Agency loan (€10million) and Dept of Environment investment (€36million).

[video=youtube;nlkipXgHK3E]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlkipXgHK3E[/video]
what is the process and timeline of proposing this to the council?
 

Analyzer

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Why more houses than apartments when families are downsizing and we actually have an excess of three/four bedrooms and a far more critical deficiency in apartments?
I think this is what happens when politicians take over.

You end up with houses full of workers having to commute further and further away.

In addition apartments deliver more accomodation for a higher number of people in the same time frame.
 

making waves

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Fundamentally land is over valued. That's what it all comes down to and no long term solution is possible with a significant reduction in the value of land.
Of course land is 'over-valued' - that's what happens when you let the 'market' dictate housing need. In 1974 the Kenny report was published. The report contained recommendations for the control of the price of building land. Was it ever implemented? was it like f*ck - FF/FG/LP had too much to 'gain' out of pump-priming the construction industry and ultimately the property bubble. Hell, even when the GP adopted the Kenny Report as policy and Gormley was minister for the environment, he did nothing about it.

If you want to solve the housing crisis then you have to remove control of the housing 'market' from the developers, spivs and speculators and put it directly under public control.
 

Niall996

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Messages
11,823
Of course land is 'over-valued' - that's what happens when you let the 'market' dictate housing need. In 1974 the Kenny report was published. The report contained recommendations for the control of the price of building land. Was it ever implemented? was it like f*ck - FF/FG/LP had too much to 'gain' out of pump-priming the construction industry and ultimately the property bubble. Hell, even when the GP adopted the Kenny Report as policy and Gormley was minister for the environment, he did nothing about it.

If you want to solve the housing crisis then you have to remove control of the housing 'market' from the developers, spivs and speculators and put it directly under public control.
Oh to have an actual market!! What a dream. Of course the property market is not a free open capitalist market. It's completely and utterly controlled in every conceivable way. It's one of the most regulated socialist markets in existence. Everything from zoning to ownership rights, to conveyancing to tax, to VAT to building regulations to employment legislation to laws on personal insolvency to laws on corporate bankruptcy to lending regulations...the list is endless and infinite.
 


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