Protest Posters for the Election

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SeamusNapoleon

Can anyone tell me what kind of laws are in place for putting up posters?

Specifically, if one wanted to put up posters coming up to the general election regarding our current treacherous government's record in power - what they have achieved.

Something along the lines of what Cóir had up for Lisbon.
I am very anti-Cóir for the record, I just mean brief slogans detailing a few things this current treacherous government has done - and factual ones, things that cannot be dismissed as extreme 'lefty'/republican exaggeration.

I presume some sort of Garda permit or something?
Or would it not be allowed at election time?
 


The OD

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I know some people who are making up protest posters for use in Government ministers constituencies. They will be listing facts about each minister or gimp (junior) minister.

All at their own expense, but nice and big and bright and will be put up alongside the useless feckers posters. They expect them to be ripped down, they will have plenty to replace them.
 
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SeamusNapoleon

I know some people who are making up protest posters for use in Government ministers constituencies. They will be listing facts about each minister or gimp (junior) minister.

All at their own expense, but nice and big and bright and will be put up alongside the useless feckers posters. They expect them to be ripped down, they will have plenty to replace them.
A great idea. I'm looking to do something similar.
 
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SeamusNapoleon

If you're not supporting any other parties on your posters though.
Like, not even an ABFF stance, just a few clear facts about what they've done.
 

hiding behind a poster

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Can anyone tell me what kind of laws are in place for putting up posters?

Specifically, if one wanted to put up posters coming up to the general election regarding our current treacherous government's record in power - what they have achieved.

Something along the lines of what Cóir had up for Lisbon.
I am very anti-Cóir for the record, I just mean brief slogans detailing a few things this current treacherous government has done - and factual ones, things that cannot be dismissed as extreme 'lefty'/republican exaggeration.

I presume some sort of Garda permit or something?
Or would it not be allowed at election time?
No, its not allowed anytime. You can only put up posters during an election campaign if you're standing for election. Alternatively, you can put up posters advertising a public meeting that you're holding.
 
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SeamusNapoleon

No, its not allowed anytime. You can only put up posters during an election campaign if you're standing for election. Alternatively, you can put up posters advertising a public meeting that you're holding.
I'm not trying to be a smartarse here, but might the advertisements for a public meeting list the reasons the meeting is being held?
Namely, what the government has done.

A loophole basically.
 

locke

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No, its not allowed anytime. You can only put up posters during an election campaign if you're standing for election. Alternatively, you can put up posters advertising a public meeting that you're holding.
That's the general rule for putting up posters (although it scarcely seems enforced outside Dublin).

But what if you paid for advertising space?
 

hiding behind a poster

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I'm not trying to be a smartarse here, but might the advertisements for a public meeting list the reasons the meeting is being held?
Namely, what the government has done.

A loophole basically.
Of course they can. But you still have to hold the public meeting, and state where and when its being held, and who's holding it.
 

hiding behind a poster

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That's the general rule for putting up posters (although it scarcely seems enforced outside Dublin).

But what if you paid for advertising space?
I think the rules are broadly the same.
 

EUrJokingMeRight

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No, its not allowed anytime. You can only put up posters during an election campaign if you're standing for election. Alternatively, you can put up posters advertising a public meeting that you're holding.
Put them up anyway. The electorate should be reminded of any poor performances.
Also Spend some of your money on handy little fliers that can be handed out to citizens and popped through their letter boxes.
Start facebook groups on the offending ministers/TDs.
 

Oppenheimer

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Can anyone tell me what kind of laws are in place for putting up posters?

Specifically, if one wanted to put up posters coming up to the general election regarding our current treacherous government's record in power - what they have achieved.

Something along the lines of what Cóir had up for Lisbon.
I am very anti-Cóir for the record, I just mean brief slogans detailing a few things this current treacherous government has done - and factual ones, things that cannot be dismissed as extreme 'lefty'/republican exaggeration.

I presume some sort of Garda permit or something?
Or would it not be allowed at election time?
Definitely something to ask forgiveness for and not permission. Provided the information is factual and correct in the posters then I don't see why they should not be allowed. People voting for any politician based solely on their party or name should be reminded of poor performance where it exists. The biggest single thing I have a gripe about is the incompetence and lack of qualifications most politicians have in doing their job. Any politician canvassing at my door will be asked to recite their CV and why they believe they are right for the job with respect to qualification, experience and track record.
 

hiding behind a poster

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Put them up anyway. The electorate should be reminded of any poor performances.
Also Spend some of your money on handy little fliers that can be handed out to citizens and popped through their letter boxes.
Start facebook groups on the offending ministers/TDs.
But if you're gonna do all that, you might as well also say who you want to see replacing them.
 
S

SeamusNapoleon

But if you're gonna do all that, you might as well also say who you want to see replacing them.
I dunno.

I disagree with this whole notion that it's immature to just want to see them punished. If I am going to have to spend a miserable, cold and damp January/February encountering these gombeen stains smiling at me from lampposts, I would like the comfort of knowing there are reminders to people of what these gombeen stains are really like.
 

Oppenheimer

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But if you're gonna do all that, you might as well also say who you want to see replacing them.
I wouldn't - the simpletons that voted for the incumbent incompetents need very simple messages - DON'T MAKE THE SAME MISTAKE TWICE is as much as they can take onboard!
 

Luigi Vampa

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Specifically, if one wanted to put up posters coming up to the general election regarding our current treacherous government's record in power - what they have achieved.
A large trailer or teleporter etc. parked on private land but in a promenent roadside location emblazoned with your message / banner would be the best option.
 

Oppenheimer

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Whatever about the litter laws, it looks from this that you have to get permission from SIPO if you spend money on your posters - Guidelines for the general election to the 30th Dáil, Standards in Public Office Commission
I don't think that counts if the posters are generic and have a non-targeted message, something like "Remember the record of those we elected last time - would you do it again?" That could be put up in multiple constituencies and as its not promoting a party is just advertising.
 
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I don't think that counts if the posters are generic and have a non-targeted message, something like "Remember the record of those we elected last time - would you do it again?" That could be put up in multiple constituencies and as its not promoting a party is just advertising.
If you follow the link in the page I linked to above to the definition of an "other person", you'll come to this page - Guidelines for the general election to the 30th Dáil, Standards in Public Office Commission

In particular, note the following:
4.2 An "other person", is a person or group, other than a candidate, the election agent of a candidate, a national agent of a political party or a third party, who intends to incur expenditure at the election to promote or oppose a candidate or a political party or to otherwise influence the outcome of the election.
I read your suggested poster as opposing FF & the Greens, which would require someone spending money on such a poster to have to get SIPO's OK. If they don't, they could be prosecuted: Guidelines for the general election to the 30th Dáil, Standards in Public Office Commission

Sounds reasonable to me, cos otherwise parties could surreptitiously run negative posters and not have to account for them within their own spending limits. If the person sends the required info. to SIPO and is not connected to a party, no problem.
 


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