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Protestants in Cavan and Monaghan - Census 2006 (map)

Oriel27

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Apr 25, 2008
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286
I know scotstown well (mother hails from there) and I wouldn't agree with the effect of the border campaign at all. Plenty of land in Protestant hands and there still is in at the least the areas between Scotstown and Monaghan town. I'll have to quiz her on the effects of the border campaign as that is news to me.
Drum on other hand - It has "the feel" of a Northern Ireland / English village. Hard to explain but you can almost sense that it is out of place.
At the formation of the free state and yes indeed the border campaign alot of protestants did leave. Im from the scotstown area towards Roslea, and i could point to you 3 orange halls in ruins. If you study the parish History of Scotsown, smithboro, Kilmore and Drumsnatt, you would be amazed to find how many protestant families existed before the formation of the free state, and how many left after it.
Well i know for certain over half my fathers land was previously protestant owned by 4 different families. And my da bought a farm of the neighbour around the 60's that was moving to the north.
Im not saying there was any ill feeling at all, i have no evidence of that, but with close proximity to the border i would deduce alot of protestants felt better moving to the north.
 


Oriel27

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Apr 25, 2008
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286
As a person who was born and bred in north Monaghan, and who has seen the demographics of the area change, but not for the reasons given above.....Unemployment devastated county Monaghan and most of the young people of the 40, 50, and 60 went abroad to make a living, there were some jobs in the towns but as most of the businesses were protestant owned, they only employed protestants...Catholics could sometimes get the most menial jobs....

I never experienced any religious hatred or bigotry during my time there...The demographic changes came about because of returning emigrants with money in their pockets , being in a position to start their own businesses and able to buy land...many protestant families choose to send their children to England or up North for an education believing that the standards were better....Many of these children choose to stay after their education and never returned to work the farms or shops of their parents.......Elderly parents with no sons or daughters waiting to take over had to sell their properties......

Their was a reluctance in the early years of independence for people of the protestant tradition to give their allegiance to the emerging Irish state....some just couldn't stomach the new scene and left....Those that remained generally became part of the new Irish nation although a few clung to their British colonial past (and still do ) and continued to
yearn for their british culture and privilages that it brought ....


Again i havent said there was any sectarianism at all, im just pointing out these facts based on parish history when many cencuses were carried out and from local knowledge.
But there was and still is an element of being rejected/left behind by the north.

Yes you are very right about mass unemployment in the mid 20th century in North Monaghan, and this probably was a bigger factor
 

ArtyQueing

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Jun 2, 2008
Messages
302
At the formation of the free state and yes indeed the border campaign alot of protestants did leave. Im from the scotstown area towards Roslea, and i could point to you 3 orange halls in ruins. If you study the parish History of Scotsown, smithboro, Kilmore and Drumsnatt, you would be amazed to find how many protestant families existed before the formation of the free state, and how many left after it.
Well i know for certain over half my fathers land was previously protestant owned by 4 different families. And my da bought a farm of the neighbour around the 60's that was moving to the north.
Im not saying there was any ill feeling at all, i have no evidence of that, but with close proximity to the border i would deduce alot of protestants felt better moving to the north.
Now the protestant farmers are on the move to Scotland - which makes them Scottish Ulster Scots
 

Jung at Heart

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Sep 28, 2017
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149
I'm from Cavan and know many protestants from the county and it has never been an issue among us or anyone I know. they just go about their business freely.
 

bang bang

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Joined
Jul 11, 2010
Messages
1,238
Ceilteach, brilliant post about the maps Monaghan and Cavan.

Im a Monaghan man and yes you have the colour codes spot on. The dark red patches are areas called Rockcorry, Aghabog and Ballybay. I can tell you now even to this day they are very protestant areas. Semour Crawford comes from Aghabog.
It goes without saying around them areas, if its protestant land for sale, a catholic wont get it. Your the "wrong colour" is the expression.
The light red area is Drum in the west and Oram in the east. Again very pro-british areas.
ye still would have all the young ones here looking towards the north to go to college etc.
Big Ian Paisley has a church in Drum. It got burnt there a few years ago.

The light blue areas at the north of the county were extremely protestant areas pre 1921. I should know because we bought up all the land as the protestants left.
An area known as scotstown close to Rosslea was a great protestant area at one time, theres not one left.
1950/60's border campaign made alot of them leave.

Its unfair how alot of good living decent protestant folk had to leave their home land because of bigotted catholic dublin. Protestant folk in the state were and are treated badly.
WTF are you about, nobody cares what religion anyone is, apart from the few like yourself.
 


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