Protestants in the Famine

dekteon

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there's a new 2-part docudrama starting on RTE next Tuesday, following the story of a Protestant family who were forced to emigrate during the Famine. Promo on You Tube at

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Flv0PF_-j8]YouTube - DEATH OR CANADA[/ame]

Raises the question of to what degree did protestants suffer during the Famine? would be interested in your views
 


Aindriu

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Contrary to popular opinion, there were many ordinary protestants who were affected by the famine. The ruling classes and landlord class of the day didn't give 2 hoots what religion the ordinary masses were. If they couldn't pay their rents they were evicted.
 

bobbysands81

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We had a potato blight not a "famine".

Ireland remained a net exporter of food during the time of the potato blight.
 

FutureTaoiseach

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BBC NI had an interesting documentary on this in recent years claiming that Ulster was worse affected than Leinster. Having said that this should not be exaggerated and it should be remembered that the Catholics in the West had by far the worst of it, and that the underlying causes of the Famine included a system that impoverished Catholics disproportionately by banning them from universities and forcing them to pay tithes to the Anglican Church and above all forcing them under the thumb of Cromwellian-descendent gentry that were rackrenting the population. Protestants were also victims but to a far lesser extent, not least because unlike Catholics they were more likely to have old-money in the family because they had not been barred recently from education, professions like law, and inheriting and buying property.
 

thegreenview

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We had a potato blight not a "famine".

Ireland remained a net exporter of food during the time of the potato blight.
The fact of the matter is we had both, the potato crop failing was a problem but also the fact that large amounts of meat and cereals continued to be exported while the potato crop failed in successive years caused the "Famine"
 

Aindriu

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The fact of the matter is we had both, the potato crop failing was a problem but also the fact that large amounts of meat and cereals continued to be exported while the potato crop failed in successive years caused the "Famine"
Added to which is the fact that the majority of the population only had the potato available as their main food source. Any other crops they grew went as rent to the landlords. It was the landlords who did the exporting - not the tenants.
 

Squire Allworthy

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The Protestant departure out of Ireland to America started long before the famine and was due to the religious persecution and impoverishment.
 

Paddy O'China

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The fact of the matter is we had both, the potato crop failing was a problem but also the fact that large amounts of meat and cereals continued to be exported while the potato crop failed in successive years caused the "Famine"
There was also ample amounts of corn but the British government refused to bring down the price so the markets would not be affected. Genocide by economics. 1 million dead in the richest empire in the world.
 

Nem

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Current issue of History Ireland has a lot about Canada in it and I think there is a conference about this (the Irish in Canada) in Queen's early next year.
 

locke

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The Protestant departure out of Ireland to America started long before the famine and was due to the religious persecution and impoverishment.
There were departures on both sides. At least 500,000 Irish people left for America between American Independence and the start of the Great Famine.

I doubt persecution of Protestants was much of a problem in the first half of the nineteenth century, although desire to be part of a larger community may have caused many to leave.

Incidentally, that statement about Ulster was tenuous at best. As the map below shows, only Cavan, Monaghan and Fermanagh were badly affected

 

Breadan O'Connor

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Class is what matters not Religion.
In ulster there was the "Ulster custom" which meant a tenant wouldn't be evicted if he could pay his rent.

This would have favored protestants, I don't know if catholics were entitled to benefit from it.

In the rest of Ireland a tenant could be thrown out even if he was willing and able to pay the rent.

Also Catholics had to pay ten per cent of their income to the Church of Ireland.
 

Squire Allworthy

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locke

Thanks, I thought there was a considerable movement in the 18th century. Mainly Presbyterian and I was of the impression it was due to the Penal Law of 1704, sharp increases in rent and a decline in the linen and wool industry due to the drought around 1715 which I think lasted 5 years! Hard to believe, the only reason I remember any of this.
http://www.politics.ie/members/locke.html
 

Ceilteach

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I was watching a doc about Gweedore, Gweedore is an Irish speaking parish in Donegal and people went over there during the famine years and they were hardly effected by it.
 

dissident

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Truth.ie

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LOL!!!

Protestant victimhood to the fore!!!
To be fair, there was an earlier famine which forced tens of thousands of Ulster Scots to emigrate from Scotland and the North of Ireland. Most would've been Presbyterian types. Some went on to form the militia in America which fought the British in the American War of Independance.
some historians say the earlier famine was (per capita) as deadly as the one of 1847 and had the same political overtones, particularly in the West of Scotland.
 

bobbysands81

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To be fair, there was an earlier famine which forced tens of thousands of Ulster Scots to emigrate from Scotland and the North of Ireland. Most would've been Presbyterian types. Some went on to form the militia in America which fought the British in the American War of Independance.
some historians say the earlier famine was (per capita) as deadly as the one of 1847 and had the same political overtones, particularly in the West of Scotland.
Did this "Famine" only attack Protestants?
 

Aindriu

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LOL!!!

Protestant victimhood to the fore!!!
You do realise I take it that the Catholic church in the 1600's, 1700's and 1800's victimised the Baptists amongst others? How the hell do you think the Pilgrim Fathers voyage to New England in the US came about?
 


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