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Psychology, empirical and localised dynamics, data-points

Lumpy Talbot

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I had to think for a bit where this OP might sit in terms of a forum. Community was one possibility, science and education another. I settled on health and social affairs not so much for health but for the 'social affairs' part of the title.

This is going to be a slippy one to describe. I think there is a profound shift in psychology about to happen and I believe it stems from deeper and richer data-streams increasingly available which are about to allow us to shift away from the snapshot psychological approach of analysing complex dynamics with a single chart or set of static charts and we are moving into the era of dynamic data updated by the pico-second which we can image onto a screen and watch as it morphs shape, like watching a nightvision film of a gorilla shape greenly glowing in the dark jungle as its movements are tracked from a safe distance.

My sense is a transformation is on the way. There are no perfectly clean and up to date databases anywhere. I'd be hugely surprised if there was such an accurate database anywhere in the world. Not even intelligence agency datasets are updated for accuracy at a rate much higher than wikipedia.

Having said that a brilliant technical colleague of mine once remarked that 'perfection in this area is an over-rated concept'. When you think about it if you wanted to plot a moving data shape and interpret it against a landscape of context in computer simulation that is perfectly possible without a hysterically cleaned dataset. Your margin of data error just has to be small enough not to change the shape of the strange new animal on the screen as it shifts back and forth uneasily snuffling at the bars of its contextualised compound.

Implications: The Science of Risk, Existential Risk Management could become rather esoterical as VR and data immersion techniques improve. We could someday someone going to work by putting on a helmet, activating an implant node, or data harvesting and analytical roles which look to the office as an imaginative and clear approach to interpretation of data but which in the VR skin available to the user may be represented as a motorcycle race on the Isle of Man or a series of hurdles in an Olympics race or anything the worker wishes.

It was a game of mine on long car and rail journeys to try to see the world in a different perceptual way. As coloured dynamics swirling across a land that was sometimes flat, sometimes mountainous but always in flux. You can see this in traffic management data and dynamics in cities. Look at a time-lapse of pedestrian and motor traffic through Piccadilly Circus. Some obvious and interpretable dynamics visible which can be extracted back to a series of data labels such as Economics, Sociology, Climate Geography, and the most weasily dataset of them all, elements of human nature and the psychology of the human animal in its environment.

No links to share with you on this one although I may have a deeper look if the subject is of interest to anyone else. My opinion in summary is that we are on the cusp of a revolution in the way we perceive the world. The Human psychology involved means we are likely to see as many challenges as opportunities so while I'm fairly excited about it all I'me even more interested in seeing the impact on the world around us as our digital shadow cities and constantly moving dynamics swirl around a new dimension and landscape in human powers of symbol and representation.

Cheers for listen-o-viewing thus far. You are a good lad to do it, fair ankled or not.
 


Lumpy Talbot

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The scientific process requires validation beyond error rates before a theory becomes a scientific law or principle upon which other work can be based.

In the real world a database with 97% accuracy or less than 3% lag in data integrity is acceptable when matched against a task which examines broad dynamics.

Safety features and a regulatory framework are absolutely essential in this area. Vigilance against misuse should be high.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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I realise the OP might seem a bit vague but the implications are vast and defy categorisation. In an effort to provide some examples of the emerging new abstract world we are becoming more familiar with.

(1) The study of datapoints examined by medical scientists in tracking disease outbreaks and hotspots such as SARS in Asia, 'bird flu' and other high population risks may be at some stage all that stands between us and a global pandemic.

(2) MRI scanners and the data they produce require vast processing power in projects such as the attempt to move towards a more personalised medicine. A swathe of breast cancers seem to be triggered at cellular stage by overproduction of oestrogen. There's a possibility in the future that we will be able to head this off in many cases by a method of controlling cells to turn off or moderate the overpoduction of oestrogen. We need massive processing power to be able to get there if we are trying to photograph the human body at cellular level.

(3) Google algorithms are at work analysing ways to advance ways in which we handle medical data and empirical learnings from the data. Risk: Could be highly intrusive if insurance companies were allowed access the data. Google algorithms are also involved in analysing ways to save power across energy grids which I believe contains some remarkable possible savings.

(4) In the last year or so some very high level investors have begun organising themselves to bring the private equity/venture capital business model practices into the drug discovery pipeline. I think it is because they know this market runs on synergies very close to that natural model- stage one investment, stage two, stage three into the trials stage and eventual market access which is where the investment pays off. Early stages and second stages are almost natural secondary markets and the five year traditional entry and exit point matches the drug production line model in rough timelines. These businesses exercise extreme levels of due diligence and analysis and data from financial records of a target investment along with market and sector data is critical to this vast sector of the global service sector.

There is a possible political element to the high level business emerging business dynamics and in the new trend I'm calling above there is a visible international element, with some of the investors I mention being in advisory positions to Washington, London and Beijing, as well as Moscow.

Look at GPS services taken now as normal on wristwatches and mobile phones. Walk through computer simulations of yet-to-be-built buildings.

The ongoing struggle to keep online data and traffic coherently organised is a challenge in itself.
 
Last edited:

StarryPlough01

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A paradigm shift

A. The internet of things

B. Intelligent transport

C. Intelligently managed electrical grid that supports renewable energy

Those 3 things taken together will constitute a new industrial revolution that will fundamentally change the human condition. A paradigm shift - change whole world fundamentally - possibly in a good way.

Things you want cost nothing - energy is free, you can go wherever you want whenever you want, and everything can come to you. Enough for everybody.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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I'd rather hope so, Starry, we definitely need newer sources of plentiful energy. Probably will emerge from technological advances.

The cynical side of my nature suggests that should such things arise some oligarch will corner it and monetize it.

The average Joe may not get a look in.
 

Mrs. Crotta Cliach

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In the meantime we have over half a million individuals waiting to see a doctor or have surgery of some sort. Lack of doctors and money is going to slow us down and perhaps bring us down. The line may be moving but perhaps in the wrong direction.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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That's an extraordinary queue number for a population our size.
 

Mrs. Crotta Cliach

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In the meantime, in Ireland, I have been musing on the changes wrought by large extended families going to small families dying off, and governments inability to cope with responsibilities formerly accepted and carried by family. No family, no care. Thinking on this as neighbor is developing dementia, has no family, solicitor could not care less, doc is too busy and the world will ignore her fear-panic and loneliness. Is this where we are headed? Hungry, alone and dying in a nice house.
 

Mrs. Crotta Cliach

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That's an extraordinary queue number for a population our size.
Isn't it just! And we have the ability but maybe not the desire to spend money to train more doctors. We must rethink how we are going to deliver medical care to our populations.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Unfortunately, yes. The concept of social services itself is under attack even though our demographic information tells us from census work and so on that there will likely be a greater need for such safety nets in future.

Political philosophy. Thatcherism, the market is your family now, and all the rest of the politics of selfishness behind that sort of mindset all has an effect.
 

Mrs. Crotta Cliach

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I watched it start in America with that great ass, Ronald Reagan, who had no hesitation to throw the mentally ill out into the street with no plans for their care or their coping. From good old Ronny to Tiny Hands Trump is only a small step we took. I pray Varadkar is not going the same direction.
(Sorry. I sidetracked you off on medical care and didn't mean to redirect your question.) (Off to make breakfast)
 


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